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DJS0302
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      12-19-2003, 03:17 AM
This has only happened twice, tonight and one time several months ago. I
turned on the computer and I noticed the clock was an hour behind. Without
making any changes, I restarted the computer and went into the BIOS setup to
check the system time. The system time was correct. I exited the BIOS without
making any changes and continued to reboot the computer. The desktop came up
and the clock in the system tray was correct. What would make it show the
wrong time in the first place and how did it correct itself when I rebooted? I
should mention that the computer is almost 7 years old.
 
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Elector
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      12-19-2003, 11:12 AM
On 19 Dec 2003 03:17:28 GMT, (E-Mail Removed)ospam (DJS0302) had this to say and I had to reply to
it:

::This has only happened twice, tonight and one time several months ago. I
::turned on the computer and I noticed the clock was an hour behind. Without
::making any changes, I restarted the computer and went into the BIOS setup to
::check the system time. The system time was correct. I exited the BIOS without
::making any changes and continued to reboot the computer. The desktop came up
::and the clock in the system tray was correct. What would make it show the
::wrong time in the first place and how did it correct itself when I rebooted? I
::should mention that the computer is almost 7 years old.


Well it could be something as simple as the system timer has to be set in DOS. From the DOS prompt
type "time" without the quote marks, then hit enter. It will say this is the time etc. and it gives
you an option to change it. Hours, Minutes, and Seconds , and the other is more of a hassle in that
your system real time clock is ready for the replacement. You then need to write down all the BIOS
defaults and if it is the little silver oxide round 3.3v type then turn off the machine completely
and then remove and replace the battery with a new fresh one. If you have an older system it may be
the dallas type battery that looks like a little chip, that is much hard to replace and the parts
would be as hard to find. And it requires much more work. If there are other causes they can be a
simple as a resident program that runs or does not run properly or it can be more severe but I have
no way of telling from here, sorry.

I hope that helped?

Elector

 
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user@domain.invalid
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      12-19-2003, 01:31 PM


Elector wrote:
> On 19 Dec 2003 03:17:28 GMT, (E-Mail Removed)ospam (DJS0302) had this to say and I had to reply to
> it:
>
> ::This has only happened twice, tonight and one time several months ago. I
> ::turned on the computer and I noticed the clock was an hour behind. Without
> ::making any changes, I restarted the computer and went into the BIOS setup to
> ::check the system time. The system time was correct. I exited the BIOS without
> ::making any changes and continued to reboot the computer. The desktop came up
> ::and the clock in the system tray was correct. What would make it show the
> ::wrong time in the first place and how did it correct itself when I rebooted? I
> ::should mention that the computer is almost 7 years old.
>
>
> Well it could be something as simple as the system timer has to be set in DOS. From the DOS prompt
> type "time" without the quote marks, then hit enter. It will say this is the time etc. and it gives
> you an option to change it. Hours, Minutes, and Seconds , and the other is more of a hassle in that
> your system real time clock is ready for the replacement. You then need to write down all the BIOS
> defaults and if it is the little silver oxide round 3.3v type then turn off the machine completely
> and then remove and replace the battery with a new fresh one. If you have an older system it may be
> the dallas type battery that looks like a little chip, that is much hard to replace and the parts
> would be as hard to find. And it requires much more work. If there are other causes they can be a
> simple as a resident program that runs or does not run properly or it can be more severe but I have
> no way of telling from here, sorry.
>
> I hope that helped?
>
> Elector
>

Rather than writing down all the CMOS settings, there are simple
programs you can install on a boot disk that can capture and restore
them when needed. One such program is called: CMOSRAM2 If someone
wants it and can't find it via a search, I will send it to them.

Ken

 
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Elector
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      12-19-2003, 01:47 PM

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:Z4DEb.491203$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Rather than writing down all the CMOS settings, there are simple
> programs you can install on a boot disk that can capture and restore
> them when needed. One such program is called: CMOSRAM2 If someone
> wants it and can't find it via a search, I will send it to them.
>
> Ken
>


Thanks that was a very good suggestion. And it was a program I did not know
about.

Elector


 
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