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Core Duo vs. Pentium M

 
 
BT
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      03-05-2006, 06:34 PM
Is the Duo processor the better of the two processors below, even though it is
less clock speed (GHz)? This is getting verrry confusing.

Intel® Core™ Duo processor T2300 (2MB Cache/1.66GHz/667MHz FSB)
Intel® Pentium® M Processor 740 (1.73GHz/2MB Cache/533MHz FSB)

Cheers,
Bob T.


 
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Phil
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      03-05-2006, 08:08 PM
The only answer I can provide is the simple one: the Duo Core chips are
better for applications that support the technology. As of this moment, I
don't think there's a single game that would take advantage of dual core
technology, for example.

-phil

"BT" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
newsaGOf.141$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Is the Duo processor the better of the two processors below, even though
> it is
> less clock speed (GHz)? This is getting verrry confusing.
>
> Intel® CoreT Duo processor T2300 (2MB Cache/1.66GHz/667MHz FSB)
> Intel® Pentium® M Processor 740 (1.73GHz/2MB Cache/533MHz FSB)
>
> Cheers,
> Bob T.
>
>



 
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journey
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      03-05-2006, 08:25 PM
On Sun, 5 Mar 2006 13:34:16 -0500, "BT" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Is the Duo processor the better of the two processors below, even though it is
>less clock speed (GHz)? This is getting verrry confusing.
>
>Intel® Core™ Duo processor T2300 (2MB Cache/1.66GHz/667MHz FSB)
>Intel® Pentium® M Processor 740 (1.73GHz/2MB Cache/533MHz FSB)
>
>Cheers,
>Bob T.


You're right, it is confusing. I think it depends on what you want to
do with your computer.

Another question is whether the Core Solo is the same as the
Pentium-M. I thought so, but someone here said that they are
different. I think I've noticed Core Solo's with a 667Mhz FSB. So,
you may have another one to consider.

What will you be using your computer for? Is it a desktop replacement
that you will be using all the time, or is it a supplement to a
desktop system used for word processing? Would it be important to you
that the computer be able to play music MP3's while a virus checker is
running in the background?

How important is battery life for you? (not that the Core Duo's use
more, I don't know).

I recently went with the E1505, which is seen as the replacement for
the 6000. It has integrated graphics which is fine for me and might
result in better battery life.

I am also considering a 640m or the XPS 140 when it comes out with a
Core Duo (hopefully the XPS 140 will be an Inspiron 1405 which would
qualify it for the deep discount Inspiron coupons). Depending on
timing, and the initial reviews that come out once CNET and others get
their hands on a 1505, I may cancel that and go with the 14" model.

Right now the 630m and XPS 140 have promotions, but I don't want the
Dell DJ Ditty or the DVD burner -- I'd rather have a primary battery
upgrade or 1G RAM.

Obviously I didn't answer your question, but if you post more about
what you will be using your computer for others might be better able
to help you.

Journey
 
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journey
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      03-05-2006, 08:27 PM
On Sun, 5 Mar 2006 15:08:32 -0500, "Phil" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>The only answer I can provide is the simple one: the Duo Core chips are
>better for applications that support the technology. As of this moment, I
>don't think there's a single game that would take advantage of dual core
>technology, for example.
>
>-phil


Hi Phil,

Do applications have to be written specifically to take advantage of
Core Duo chips?

If a game has several threads of execution, might a Core Duo take
advantage of that?

I don't know, just wondering.

Journey
 
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Phil
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      03-06-2006, 04:11 AM
Here's a good explanation:

"A dual-core processor has many advantages especially for those looking to
boost their system's multitasking computing power. Dual-core processors
provide two complete execution cores instead of one, each with an
independent interface to the frontside bus. Since each core has its own
cache, the operating system has sufficient resources to handle intensive
tasks in parallel, which provides a noticeable improvement to multitasking."

"Complete optimization for the dual-core processor requires both the
operating system and applications running on the computer to support a
technology called thread-level parallelism, or TLP. Thread-level parallelism
is the part of the OS or application that runs multiple threads
simultaneously, where threads refer to the part of a program that can
execute independently of other parts."

"Even without a multithread-enabled application, you will still see benefits
of dual-core processors if you are running an OS that supports TLP. For
example, if you have Microsoft Windows XP (which supports multithreading),
you could have your Internet browser open along with a virus scanner running
in the background, while using Windows Media Player to stream your favorite
radio station and the dual-core processor will handle the multiple threads
of these programs running simultaneously with an increase in performance and
efficiency."

"Today Windows XP and hundreds of applications already support multithread
technology, especially applications that are used for editing and creating
music files, videos and graphics because types of programs need to perform
operations in parallel. As dual-core technology becomes more common in homes
and the workplace, you can expect to see more applications support
thread-level parallelism."

-phil

"journey" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Sun, 5 Mar 2006 15:08:32 -0500, "Phil" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>>The only answer I can provide is the simple one: the Duo Core chips are
>>better for applications that support the technology. As of this moment, I
>>don't think there's a single game that would take advantage of dual core
>>technology, for example.
>>
>>-phil

>
> Hi Phil,
>
> Do applications have to be written specifically to take advantage of
> Core Duo chips?
>
> If a game has several threads of execution, might a Core Duo take
> advantage of that?
>
> I don't know, just wondering.
>
> Journey



 
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journey
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      03-06-2006, 04:47 AM
On Sun, 5 Mar 2006 23:11:19 -0500, "Phil" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Here's a good explanation:


Hi Phil,

Thanks for the good explanation. I didn't realize that apps could be
coded using TLP to make better use of the dual core processor. I
would imagine that coding to TLP standards will provide similar
benefits for AMD's dual cores? (not that I will ever buy one but
competition is good).

Journey
 
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User N
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      03-07-2006, 02:11 AM

"journey" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...

> I would imagine that coding to TLP standards will provide similar
> benefits for AMD's dual cores?


Yes, and it doesn't just apply to multi-core processors, it also applies
to multi-processor systems.
 
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