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DRM-Free Music on the iTunes Store

 
 
Michelle Steiner
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      04-02-2007, 05:14 PM
Step 1 in getting rid of protected media.

<http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2007/04/02itunes.html?sr=hotnews.rss>

CUPERTINO, California‹April 2, 2007‹Apple® today announced that EMI
Music¹s entire digital catalog of music will be available for purchase
DRM-free (without digital rights management) from the iTunes® Store
(www.itunes.com) worldwide in May. DRM-free tracks from EMI will be
offered at higher quality 256 kbps AAC encoding, resulting in audio
quality indistinguishable from the original recording, for just $1.29
per song. In addition, iTunes customers will be able to easily upgrade
their entire library of all previously purchased EMI content to the
higher quality DRM-free versions for just 30 cents a song. iTunes will
continue to offer its entire catalog, currently over five million songs,
in the same versions as today‹128 kbps AAC encoding with DRM‹at the same
price of 99 cents per song, alongside DRM-free higher quality versions
when available.

³We are going to give iTunes customers a choice‹the current versions of
our songs for the same 99 cent price, or new DRM-free versions of the
same songs with even higher audio quality and the security of
interoperability for just 30 cents more,² said Steve Jobs, Apple¹s CEO.
³We think our customers are going to love this, and we expect to offer
more than half of the songs on iTunes in DRM-free versions by the end of
this year.²

³EMI and iTunes are once again teaming up to move the digital music
industry forward by giving music fans higher quality audio that is
virtually indistinguishable from the original recordings, with no usage
restrictions on the music they love from their favorite artists,² said
Eric Nicoli, CEO of EMI Group.

With DRM-free music from the EMI catalog, iTunes customers will have the
ability to download tracks from their favorite EMI artists without any
usage restrictions that limit the types of devices or number of
computers that purchased songs can be played on. DRM-free songs
purchased from the iTunes Store will be encoded in AAC at 256 kbps,
twice the current bit rate of 128 kbps, and will play on all iPods, Mac®
or Windows computers, Apple TVs and soon iPhones, as well as many other
digital music players.

iTunes will also offer customers a simple, one-click option to easily
upgrade their entire library of all previously purchased EMI content to
the higher quality DRM-free format for 30 cents a song. All EMI music
videos will also be available in DRM-free format with no change in
price.CUPERTINO, California‹April 2, 2007‹Apple® today announced that
EMI Music¹s entire digital catalog of music will be available for
purchase DRM-free (without digital rights management) from the iTunes®
Store (www.itunes.com) worldwide in May. DRM-free tracks from EMI will
be offered at higher quality 256 kbps AAC encoding, resulting in audio
quality indistinguishable from the original recording, for just $1.29
per song. In addition, iTunes customers will be able to easily upgrade
their entire library of all previously purchased EMI content to the
higher quality DRM-free versions for just 30 cents a song. iTunes will
continue to offer its entire catalog, currently over five million songs,
in the same versions as today‹128 kbps AAC encoding with DRM‹at the same
price of 99 cents per song, alongside DRM-free higher quality versions
when available.

³We are going to give iTunes customers a choice‹the current versions of
our songs for the same 99 cent price, or new DRM-free versions of the
same songs with even higher audio quality and the security of
interoperability for just 30 cents more,² said Steve Jobs, Apple¹s CEO.
³We think our customers are going to love this, and we expect to offer
more than half of the songs on iTunes in DRM-free versions by the end of
this year.²

³EMI and iTunes are once again teaming up to move the digital music
industry forward by giving music fans higher quality audio that is
virtually indistinguishable from the original recordings, with no usage
restrictions on the music they love from their favorite artists,² said
Eric Nicoli, CEO of EMI Group.

With DRM-free music from the EMI catalog, iTunes customers will have the
ability to download tracks from their favorite EMI artists without any
usage restrictions that limit the types of devices or number of
computers that purchased songs can be played on. DRM-free songs
purchased from the iTunes Store will be encoded in AAC at 256 kbps,
twice the current bit rate of 128 kbps, and will play on all iPods, Mac®
or Windows computers, Apple TVs and soon iPhones, as well as many other
digital music players.

iTunes will also offer customers a simple, one-click option to easily
upgrade their entire library of all previously purchased EMI content to
the higher quality DRM-free format for 30 cents a song. All EMI music
videos will also be available in DRM-free format with no change in price.

--
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Hans Aberg
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      04-02-2007, 05:53 PM
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Michelle
Steiner <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Step 1 in getting rid of protected media.
>
> <http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2007/04/02itunes.html?sr=hotnews.rss>


When this other discussion came up, I sent in a suggestion to let the
market decide (i.e., letting producers and consumers choose per item). :-)

Hans Aberg
 
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Hans Aberg
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      04-02-2007, 06:27 PM
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, "G.T."
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > Step 1 in getting rid of protected media.


> ...It's definitely the
> beginning of the end for DRMed music, and we can only hope the end of
> the RIAA.


It is a big hurdle, not only for end users, but also for implementors of
software. I have just discovered (and reported) a bug whereby the OS,
under certain circumstances, does not recognize the correct region of the
DVD drive, and asks to*reset it. Suppose one would follow that advice: it
would quickly render your DVD-drive*useless in view of that one is only
allowed a total of four resettings.

Hans Aberg
 
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Jon
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      04-02-2007, 07:35 PM
Jolly Roger <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> On 2007-04-02 12:14:55 -0500, Michelle Steiner <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
> > Step 1 in getting rid of protected media.
> >
> > <http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2007/04/02itunes.html?sr=hotnews.rss>

>
> This is terrific news! And long overdue!


As a Norwegian, I can only surmise that the pressure initiated by the
Norwegian and other European consumer ombudsmen helped achieve this now.
I feel certain it wouldd have happened sooner or later anyway, though.
--
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For contact info, run the following in Terminal:
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Michelle Steiner
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      04-02-2007, 08:10 PM
In article <1hvyp27.q75xaf2u252dN%(E-Mail Removed) id>,
(E-Mail Removed)d (Jon) wrote:

> > > <http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2007...tml?sr=hotnews.
> > > rss>

> >
> > This is terrific news! And long overdue!

>
> As a Norwegian, I can only surmise that the pressure initiated by the
> Norwegian and other European consumer ombudsmen helped achieve this
> now.


I don't know about that. Apple never wanted DRM in iTunes, but the
recording labels required it as a condition of having their stuff there.

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Michelle Steiner
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      04-02-2007, 08:11 PM
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
"G.T." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> That's awesome news except for the price. For those few EMI tracks I
> can't get on eMusic for 23 cents a track I'll fill in at iTMS.


What is the quality of the eMusic stuff?

--
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Michelle Steiner
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      04-02-2007, 08:12 PM
In article <020420071120164300%dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone. ca>,
Dave Balderstone <dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca> wrote:

> > CUPERTINO, California—April 2, 2007—Apple® today announced that EMI
> > Music’s entire digital catalog of music will be available for
> > purchase DRM-free (without digital rights management) from the
> > iTunes® Store (www.itunes.com) worldwide in May.

>
> Except, apparently, for the Beatles' material.


Is the Beatles' material available through EMI? If it is, how do you
know that it won't be available on iTunes in May?

--
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Hans Aberg
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      04-02-2007, 08:25 PM
In article <1hvyp27.q75xaf2u252dN%(E-Mail Removed) id>,
(E-Mail Removed)d (Jon) wrote:

> > > <http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2007...tml?sr=hotnews.
> > > rss>

> >
> > This is terrific news! And long overdue!

>
> As a Norwegian, I can only surmise that the pressure initiated by the
> Norwegian and other European consumer ombudsmen helped achieve this
> now.


I doubt it. I think it was said somewhere the electronic music sales
weren't as good as hoped. In addition, even if folks have an iPod, that
may not be the only one, and then the protected stuff cannot be used. So
it is not a benefit to Apple either - just giving their programmers extra
work, in a world when*software is becoming really complicated. So it is
forced by a changing market. Those that move with it, will make money.

Hans Aberg
 
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Hans Aberg
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      04-02-2007, 08:40 PM
In article <020420071428200585%dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone. ca>,
dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca wrote:

> > Is the Beatles' material available through EMI? If it is, how do you
> > know that it won't be available on iTunes in May?

>
> Because EMI said so.
>
> <http://apnews.myway.com/article/20070402/D8O8H0EG0.html>


This is not too surprising. The use of DRM builds on the unsupported
belief that without it, everyone will just copy instead of buying (even
though it is easy to remove by those that want to do just that). So when
moving away from DRM, one will first try things that are not so sensitive
if something might go wrong. For example, some artists can make a lot of
money on performances or playing in payed media, so for those, it may not
be a catastrophe if*music track sales drop. Beatles is not in that
category.

Hans Aberg
 
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Hans Aberg
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      04-02-2007, 09:13 PM
In article <020420071458530567%dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone. ca>,
dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca wrote:

> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Hans Aberg <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > In article <020420071428200585%dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone. ca>,
> > dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca wrote:
> >
> > > > Is the Beatles' material available through EMI? If it is, how do you
> > > > know that it won't be available on iTunes in May?
> > >
> > > Because EMI said so.
> > >
> > > <http://apnews.myway.com/article/20070402/D8O8H0EG0.html>

> >
> > This is not too surprising. The use of DRM builds on the unsupported
> > belief that without it, everyone will just copy instead of buying (even
> > though it is easy to remove by those that want to do just that). So when
> > moving away from DRM, one will first try things that are not so sensitive
> > if something might go wrong. For example, some artists can make a lot of
> > money on performances or playing in payed media, so for those, it may not
> > be a catastrophe ifÂ*music track sales drop. Beatles is not in that
> > category.

>
> You didn't read the article. Much easier to make stuff up, right?
>
> EMI is only the distributor for The Beatles. Apple Corp has to agree to
> put them on iTunes.


So you didn't read or understand what I wrote then?

Hans Aberg
 
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