Motherboard Forums


Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes

First Die-Shot Photograph of Intel Larrabee

 
 
NV55
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-14-2009, 03:00 AM
http://img2.pict.com/51/47/27/8651f4...eedieshot6.jpg

discussion
http://forum.beyond3d.com/showthread.php?t=54144

apparently there are 32 cores in this chip, plus a number of other
structures / functional units
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
NV55
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-14-2009, 05:13 PM
On May 14, 2:58*am, Terje Mathisen <"terje.mathisen at tmsw.no">
wrote:
> NV55 wrote:
> >http://img2.pict.com/51/47/27/8651f4...0/53NzS/intell...

>
> > discussion
> >http://forum.beyond3d.com/showthread.php?t=54144

>
> Quite nice thread actually!
>
>
>
> > apparently there are 32 cores in this chip, plus a number of other
> > structures / functional units

>
> Assuming Intel can get this to work nearly as well as Mike Abrash' and
> Tom Forsyth's talks at GDC indicated, it looks a lot like a single-chip
> solution for a cheap-to-manufacture box with very decent 3D performance.
>
> Terje
> --
> - <Terje.Mathisen at tmsw.no>
> "almost all programming can be viewed as an exercise in caching"




Yes. I could imagine low-end PCs using a single 32 core Larrabee chip
(later 48 or 64 cores) having very nice 3D performance (2 TFLOPs)

Then I could see higher-end PCs, with 2 Larrabee chips, perhaps 4,
as high-end gaming rigs and other machines as personal supercomputers
--much like what Nvidia does with their GeForce-based Telsa chips.

I could also see Larrabee, or perhaps Larrabee2, being the heart of a
next generation game console from Sony or Microsoft, or less likely,
Apple or SEGA.

And like with IBM's CELL in Roadrunner, I could see Intel getting a
contract to use Larrabee in a next-gen record breaking Supercomputer.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
deimos
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-15-2009, 02:09 AM
Terje Mathisen wrote:
> NV55 wrote:
>> http://img2.pict.com/51/47/27/8651f4...eedieshot6.jpg
>>
>>
>> discussion
>> http://forum.beyond3d.com/showthread.php?t=54144

>
> Quite nice thread actually!
>>
>> apparently there are 32 cores in this chip, plus a number of other
>> structures / functional units

>
> Assuming Intel can get this to work nearly as well as Mike Abrash' and
> Tom Forsyth's talks at GDC indicated, it looks a lot like a single-chip
> solution for a cheap-to-manufacture box with very decent 3D performance.
>
> Terje


Or a steaming pile of **** that wastes everyones time. But other than
that, yah.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Martin Thompson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-15-2009, 11:51 AM
Morten Reistad <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> We may even see advances in sensing, good enough for cars to have
> some self-steering ability, but they probably won't rival horses
> yet.
>


*Some* self steering ability has been around for a while now:

http://youtube.com/?v=xlVx4Dhglkg

(see about 4:40 )

That was 1994... similar systems are in production now
(eg. http://ir.trw.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=345841). And no, they
don't rival horses just yet

(I worked peripherally on the Lucas/Jaguar project, and was very
involved its follow-ups and on the TRW production one)

Cheers,
Martin

--
(E-Mail Removed)
TRW Conekt - Consultancy in Engineering, Knowledge and Technology
http://www.conekt.net/electronics.html
 
Reply With Quote
 
Mike Ray
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-15-2009, 01:08 PM
NV55 wrote:
> On May 14, 2:58 am, Terje Mathisen <"terje.mathisen at tmsw.no">
> wrote:
>> NV55 wrote:
>>> http://img2.pict.com/51/47/27/8651f4...0/53NzS/intell...
>>> discussion
>>> http://forum.beyond3d.com/showthread.php?t=54144

>> Quite nice thread actually!
>>
>>
>>
>>> apparently there are 32 cores in this chip, plus a number of other
>>> structures / functional units

>> Assuming Intel can get this to work nearly as well as Mike Abrash' and
>> Tom Forsyth's talks at GDC indicated, it looks a lot like a single-chip
>> solution for a cheap-to-manufacture box with very decent 3D performance.
>>
>> Terje
>> --
>> - <Terje.Mathisen at tmsw.no>
>> "almost all programming can be viewed as an exercise in caching"

>
>
>
> Yes. I could imagine low-end PCs using a single 32 core Larrabee chip
> (later 48 or 64 cores) having very nice 3D performance (2 TFLOPs)
>
> Then I could see higher-end PCs, with 2 Larrabee chips, perhaps 4,
> as high-end gaming rigs and other machines as personal supercomputers
> --much like what Nvidia does with their GeForce-based Telsa chips.
>
> I could also see Larrabee, or perhaps Larrabee2, being the heart of a
> next generation game console from Sony or Microsoft, or less likely,
> Apple or SEGA.
>
> And like with IBM's CELL in Roadrunner, I could see Intel getting a
> contract to use Larrabee in a next-gen record breaking Supercomputer.


Yeah and Skynet and all those machines....
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First Die-Shot Photograph of Intel Larrabee NV55 Nvidia 4 05-15-2009 01:08 PM
First Die-Shot Photograph of Intel Larrabee NV55 Intel 3 05-15-2009 01:08 PM
Intel shows first Larrabee wafer. Each Larrabee chip is as large asNvidia's 65nm GT200 / GTX280 sprite scaler ATI 0 04-11-2009 07:28 AM
Intel shows first Larrabee wafer. Each Larrabee chip is as large asNvidia's 65nm GT200 / GTX280 sprite scaler Nvidia 0 04-11-2009 07:28 AM
Intel Larrabee [speculation] to offer 16x the performance of GeForce8800 ? - Intel, Nvidia partnership to give Larrabee hardware rasterizingcapability? Larrabee could be useful for games NV55 Intel 0 12-19-2007 02:43 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:32 PM.


Welcome!
Welcome to Motherboard Point
 

Advertisment