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Future of Cooling

 
 
peter
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      07-23-2008, 06:55 PM
It will be interesting to see some test results

http://www.danamics.com/danamics-lm10.aspx


peter

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peter
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      07-24-2008, 03:59 AM
I had no idea it been that long in development..........I would still like
to see some tests...
I would think it would beat a H20 cooled unit...
as for the start up problem.. who says there would be??
I would assume that the Magnetic Pump would keep circulating the liquid
metal ...
I also would assume that the liquid metal would stay liquid until a fairly
low(sub zero) temp
One would think that the metal would be capable of removing more heat from
the CPU and that
heat would be absorbed by the radiator and removed by the fan(s)
Whether it be more efficient than Water or Air Cooled Heatpipes only a Test
can determine
I never shut down anyways

peter

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offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
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"Phil Weldon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) m...
> 'peter' wrote:
>> It will be interesting to see some test results
>>
>> http://www.danamics.com/danamics-lm10.aspx

> _____
>
> Coming real soon now to your personal computer... for, oh, from since at
> least 2005. I'd guess that, at best, the system would be inferior to any
> system using water as the transfer fluid, and wouldn't work below body
> temperature; you'd have to kick start your PC in the morning with a hair
> dryer.
>
> Phil Weldon
>
> "peter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:_8Lhk.24664$nD.5230@pd7urf1no...
>> It will be interesting to see some test results
>>
>> http://www.danamics.com/danamics-lm10.aspx
>>
>>
>> peter
>>
>> --
>> DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
>> offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
>> If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
>> me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate... ;-)
>>
>>

>

 
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Paul
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      07-24-2008, 06:32 AM
peter wrote:
> I had no idea it been that long in development..........I would still like
> to see some tests...
> I would think it would beat a H20 cooled unit...
> as for the start up problem.. who says there would be??
> I would assume that the Magnetic Pump would keep circulating the liquid
> metal ...
> I also would assume that the liquid metal would stay liquid until a
> fairly low(sub zero) temp
> One would think that the metal would be capable of removing more heat
> from the CPU and that
> heat would be absorbed by the radiator and removed by the fan(s)
> Whether it be more efficient than Water or Air Cooled Heatpipes only a
> Test can determine
> I never shut down anyways
>
> peter
>


The heat of vaporization is a very effective mechanism for
heat transport. That is what a heatpipe relies on. This
diagram illustrates the reason graphically (although this is
for Zinc). The large vertical rise, at the boiling point, shows
the energy input needed to turn the material into a vapor. And riding
up and down that large vertical line, is where a heatpipe operates.
A heatpipe, in fact, is hundreds of times more effective than a
solid piece of copper of the same size. It is the same cycle used
by air conditioning (heat of vaporization).

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...2Cl%2Cg%29.PNG

The liquid metal device, on the other hand, rides the gently sloped
diagonal in the middle of the chart. At least in the case of Zinc,
that would not be as effective a means of transporting heat.

The heatpipe solution is "self propelled", in the sense that
the vapor will transport itself to the cool end of the tube
and condense. Flow of the condensed liquid is aided by
capillary action on the inside surface of the heatpipe,
sometimes provided by a sintered finish on the inside of
the pipe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sintering

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heatpipe

I suppose one advantage of a liquid metal, might be an
extended operating range temperature-wise.

The fin part of both cooling solutions would compare on an
equal footing, and the cooler with the most fin area and
good airflow past the fins, would win at that level. The reason
for any transport mechanism, is to more effectively couple
heat into the fins. In heatsinks that lack a transport mechanism
(other than conduction), usually the very end of the fin is
virtually useless, as the tnermal resistance of the (thin) fin
prevents the ends from becoming very hot. Making a fin thicker
isn't optimal, because then there is less surface area per
unit volume of fins.

Paul
 
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peter
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      07-25-2008, 01:45 AM
Thanks Guys..........I am going to go and do a little more research on it.

peter

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DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
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If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
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"Paul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:g697hu$u7q$(E-Mail Removed)...
> peter wrote:
>> I had no idea it been that long in development..........I would still
>> like
>> to see some tests...
>> I would think it would beat a H20 cooled unit...
>> as for the start up problem.. who says there would be??
>> I would assume that the Magnetic Pump would keep circulating the liquid
>> metal ...
>> I also would assume that the liquid metal would stay liquid until a
>> fairly low(sub zero) temp
>> One would think that the metal would be capable of removing more heat
>> from the CPU and that
>> heat would be absorbed by the radiator and removed by the fan(s)
>> Whether it be more efficient than Water or Air Cooled Heatpipes only a
>> Test can determine
>> I never shut down anyways
>>
>> peter
>>

>
> The heat of vaporization is a very effective mechanism for
> heat transport. That is what a heatpipe relies on. This
> diagram illustrates the reason graphically (although this is
> for Zinc). The large vertical rise, at the boiling point, shows
> the energy input needed to turn the material into a vapor. And riding
> up and down that large vertical line, is where a heatpipe operates.
> A heatpipe, in fact, is hundreds of times more effective than a
> solid piece of copper of the same size. It is the same cycle used
> by air conditioning (heat of vaporization).
>
> http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...2Cl%2Cg%29.PNG
>
> The liquid metal device, on the other hand, rides the gently sloped
> diagonal in the middle of the chart. At least in the case of Zinc,
> that would not be as effective a means of transporting heat.
>
> The heatpipe solution is "self propelled", in the sense that
> the vapor will transport itself to the cool end of the tube
> and condense. Flow of the condensed liquid is aided by
> capillary action on the inside surface of the heatpipe,
> sometimes provided by a sintered finish on the inside of
> the pipe.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sintering
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heatpipe
>
> I suppose one advantage of a liquid metal, might be an
> extended operating range temperature-wise.
>
> The fin part of both cooling solutions would compare on an
> equal footing, and the cooler with the most fin area and
> good airflow past the fins, would win at that level. The reason
> for any transport mechanism, is to more effectively couple
> heat into the fins. In heatsinks that lack a transport mechanism
> (other than conduction), usually the very end of the fin is
> virtually useless, as the tnermal resistance of the (thin) fin
> prevents the ends from becoming very hot. Making a fin thicker
> isn't optimal, because then there is less surface area per
> unit volume of fins.
>
> Paul


 
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MS
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-27-2008, 08:29 PM
Also mercury is toxic. Wold not expect the pipes to explod during operating,
but at the end of is life cicle should be recycled!

Manuel

"Phil Weldon" <(E-Mail Removed)> escreveu na mensagem
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> 'peter' wrote, in part:
>> I would think it would beat a H20 cooled unit...
>> as for the start up problem.. who says there would be??
>> I would assume that the Magnetic Pump would keep circulating the liquid
>> metal ...
>> I also would assume that the liquid metal would stay liquid until a
>> fairly low(sub zero) temp
>> One would think that the metal would be capable of removing more heat
>> from the CPU and that...

> _____
>
>
> There is NO metal (unless you are a cosmologist and consider all the
> elements after Helium to be metals) other than mercury that is liquid
> below 20 C, not even an alloy.
>
> Water has a MUCH higher heat capacity than any metal; higher than any
> other material, in fact. In other words, it takes more heat to raise the
> temperature of a gram of water than a gram of any other material; water
> even has a higher heat capacity than Mercury by volume.
>
>
> Though, for example, mercury has greater thermal conductivity than water,
> but for convective heat transport, conductance is not the most important
> characteristic.
>
> While the element sodium has a decent heat capacity, it is a solid at room
> temperature, and isn't something you want in your living room (it is used
> in some military nuclear reactors as a coolant [and in some internal
> combustion engine exhaust valves], but for these uses is at temperatures
> much above room temperature.
>
> Phil Weldon
>
>
>
>
> "peter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:S6Thk.129510$gc5.12645@pd7urf2no...
>>I had no idea it been that long in development..........I would still like
>> to see some tests...
>> I would think it would beat a H20 cooled unit...
>> as for the start up problem.. who says there would be??
>> I would assume that the Magnetic Pump would keep circulating the liquid
>> metal ...
>> I also would assume that the liquid metal would stay liquid until a
>> fairly low(sub zero) temp
>> One would think that the metal would be capable of removing more heat
>> from the CPU and that
>> heat would be absorbed by the radiator and removed by the fan(s)
>> Whether it be more efficient than Water or Air Cooled Heatpipes only a
>> Test can determine
>> I never shut down anyways
>>
>> peter
>>
>> --
>> DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
>> offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
>> If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
>> me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate... ;-)
>>
>>
>> "Phil Weldon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed) m...
>>> 'peter' wrote:
>>>> It will be interesting to see some test results
>>>>
>>>> http://www.danamics.com/danamics-lm10.aspx
>>> _____
>>>
>>> Coming real soon now to your personal computer... for, oh, from since at
>>> least 2005. I'd guess that, at best, the system would be inferior to
>>> any system using water as the transfer fluid, and wouldn't work below
>>> body temperature; you'd have to kick start your PC in the morning with a
>>> hair dryer.
>>>
>>> Phil Weldon
>>>
>>> "peter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:_8Lhk.24664$nD.5230@pd7urf1no...
>>>> It will be interesting to see some test results
>>>>
>>>> http://www.danamics.com/danamics-lm10.aspx
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> peter
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> DISCLAIMER: If you find a posting or message from me
>>>> offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
>>>> If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
>>>> me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate... ;-)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>

>


 
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