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Internet Speed has to increase with a factor of 1000 the next fitheen years ! ;)

 
 
Skybuck Flying
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      11-20-2007, 09:37 AM
Hello,

To satisfy my Piracy Addication of Computer Games the internet speed to my
house has to increase with a factor of 1000 the next fitheen years

Fitheen years ago in 1992 I used to play ms-dos games these were usually a
few megabytes.

Now 15 years later those same games are a few gigabytes a factor of 1000
bigger !

If this trend continues then I and the rest of the world will need an
internet connection to the house of at least a factor of 1000 faster than
todays internet.

Today I have:

500 KByte/Sec down.
100 KByte/Sec Up.

In fitheen years time this will need to be:
500 MByte/Sec Down.
100 MByte/Sec Up.

A breath taking and shocking speed for todays internet !

Bye,
Skybuck.


 
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ato_zee@hotmail.com
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      11-20-2007, 12:03 PM

On 20-Nov-2007, "Skybuck Flying" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> In fitheen years time this will need to be:
> 500 MByte/Sec Down.
> 100 MByte/Sec Up.


Should be achievable. Todays backbone speeds
are 20 or more Gb/sec, and fibre connections should
be able to deliver 500 Mbyte/Sec to the user.
Internet delivery of TV is going to need it.

 
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robertwessel2@yahoo.com
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      11-20-2007, 05:33 PM
On Nov 20, 6:03 am, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> (...) and fibre connections should
> be able to deliver 500 Mbyte/Sec to the user.
> Internet delivery of TV is going to need it.



Why? Nobody is pushing full HD (1080P) at more than about 40Mb/s (and
most broadcasts are at half that). Whatever the justification for
last mile speeds of that magnitude might be, I doubt it will be that
people need 100 simultaneous 1080P streams.
 
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tony h
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      11-20-2007, 08:21 PM

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Nov 20, 6:03 am, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>> (...) and fibre connections should
>> be able to deliver 500 Mbyte/Sec to the user.
>> Internet delivery of TV is going to need it.

>
>
> Why? Nobody is pushing full HD (1080P) at more than about 40Mb/s (and
> most broadcasts are at half that). Whatever the justification for
> last mile speeds of that magnitude might be, I doubt it will be that
> people need 100 simultaneous 1080P streams.


your missing OP's point, in order to steal games at a reasonable speed his
connection must improve at the same rate as developers add data, though dvd
lasted about 10 years so far, so it's fair to guess that the new technolgies
like blu ray will last about the same (consumers not too happy at throwing
kit away too soon), and with the disks having about 5 times the capacity of
dvd (single layer) the connection would only need to increase by 5x to
enable skybuck to continue his theft at the same rate.


 
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ato_zee@hotmail.com
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      11-20-2007, 09:46 PM

On 20-Nov-2007, "tony h" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > Why? Nobody is pushing full HD (1080P) at more than about 40Mb/s (and
> > most broadcasts are at half that). Whatever the justification for
> > last mile speeds of that magnitude might be, I doubt it will be that
> > people need 100 simultaneous 1080P streams.


Multi occupancy flat and residential premises, and multi room
TV, may well need a large number of simultaneous connections
unless they are all happy watching the same program.
 
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robertwessel2@yahoo.com
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      11-20-2007, 11:11 PM
On Nov 20, 3:46 pm, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> On 20-Nov-2007, "tony h" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > > Why? Nobody is pushing full HD (1080P) at more than about 40Mb/s (and
> > > most broadcasts are at half that). Whatever the justification for
> > > last mile speeds of that magnitude might be, I doubt it will be that
> > > people need 100 simultaneous 1080P streams.

>
> Multi occupancy flat and residential premises, and multi room
> TV, may well need a large number of simultaneous connections
> unless they are all happy watching the same program.



Sure, but that's not what's meant by last mile. In the case of a
multi-unit building, you either wire each unit separately (common for
small buildings), or (usually better for large buildings), you run a
faster connection to a switch in the basement and split out individual
connections from there. But in either case, you usually don't end up
sharing a single connection too much more heavily than you would with
individual residences.

Now you might in the future, especially if the data rates get as high
as has be posited, but it makes little sense to serve both an
individual residence and a 50 unit building off equivalent single 5Gb
circuits - one will either be significant over served, or the other
underserved. At least until the point it technology advances to the
point where there's no practical (aka economic) reason to install a
circuit slower than 5Gb - although at that point one would expect
still faster speeds to be common.
 
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Othmar Wigger
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      11-23-2007, 07:07 AM
Isn't it fairly obvious which way the technology goes? - What is used
in data centers today will be in the offices a few years later, and in
our homes another few years after that.

Gigabyte Ethernet on copper wire has already well penetrated into
office use and is arriving now at homes. Optical fibre is being put
into the ground all over the world. It is approaching the last mile at
least in metropolitan areas.

I think you don't need to wait 15 years until your building will be
connected to the Internet provider with an optical fiber, whereas the
individual subscribers will tap into that with copper wires, very
probably carrying the TCP/IP protocol at 1 to 10 Gbps.

Speed is then only a question of how much bandwith you are willing to
pay for. The physical capacity of an optical fibre is enormous. Your
provider will be happy to sell you the bandwith you need.
 
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Chris S.
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      11-23-2007, 05:14 PM
My current FiOS Speeds:
Last Result:
Download Speed: 15509 kbps (1938.6 KB/sec transfer rate)
Upload Speed: 1880 kbps (235 KB/sec transfer rate)

Chris


"Othmar Wigger" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Isn't it fairly obvious which way the technology goes? - What is used
> in data centers today will be in the offices a few years later, and in
> our homes another few years after that.
>
> Gigabyte Ethernet on copper wire has already well penetrated into
> office use and is arriving now at homes. Optical fibre is being put
> into the ground all over the world. It is approaching the last mile at
> least in metropolitan areas.
>
> I think you don't need to wait 15 years until your building will be
> connected to the Internet provider with an optical fiber, whereas the
> individual subscribers will tap into that with copper wires, very
> probably carrying the TCP/IP protocol at 1 to 10 Gbps.
>
> Speed is then only a question of how much bandwith you are willing to
> pay for. The physical capacity of an optical fibre is enormous. Your
> provider will be happy to sell you the bandwith you need.


 
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Jethro
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      11-23-2007, 07:27 PM
Chris S. wrote:
> My current FiOS Speeds:
> Last Result:
> Download Speed: 15509 kbps (1938.6 KB/sec transfer rate)
> Upload Speed: 1880 kbps (235 KB/sec transfer rate)
>
> Chris
>

<snip>

And yet with all this awesome speed the ISP's keep throttling BitTorrent
traffic and put restrictions on how much you can download.
Sure you can download fast.. it just means you will reach your cap in
less time.

--
Jethro[AGHL] aka Phat_Jethro
Reply Email: jethro86 (at) gmail (dot) com
 
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tony h
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      11-23-2007, 08:02 PM

"Jethro" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:6RF1j.14$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Chris S. wrote:
>> My current FiOS Speeds:
>> Last Result:
>> Download Speed: 15509 kbps (1938.6 KB/sec transfer rate)
>> Upload Speed: 1880 kbps (235 KB/sec transfer rate)
>>
>> Chris
>>

> <snip>
>
> And yet with all this awesome speed the ISP's keep throttling BitTorrent
> traffic and put restrictions on how much you can download.
> Sure you can download fast.. it just means you will reach your cap in less
> time.



maybe time to change to a decent ISP then?


 
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