Motherboard Forums


Reply
 
 
Lowly Engineer
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-08-2007, 05:09 AM

I have a 6850 in an ASUS P5B-E. I haven't messed around with it too
much but it is stable at 3.825 GHz.

In BIOS, I have Vcore set to 'AUTO'. CPU-Z reports the voltage as
1.225, while ASUS probe reports it at 1.54V.

Which is correct?

TIA
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Paul
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-08-2007, 07:28 AM
Lowly Engineer wrote:
> I have a 6850 in an ASUS P5B-E. I haven't messed around with it too
> much but it is stable at 3.825 GHz.
>
> In BIOS, I have Vcore set to 'AUTO'. CPU-Z reports the voltage as
> 1.225, while ASUS probe reports it at 1.54V.
>
> Which is correct?
>
> TIA


CPUZ could be reporting the nominal voltage (like from a register
inside the processor). Asus Probe is more likely to be using the
hardware monitor. I'd say that Asus Probe is giving you the real scoop.

Why the voltage got that high, depends on how you are overclocking.
If you use manual overclocking techniques, then it is up to you
to turn it up that high. If using some of the automatic overclocking
techniques, then the BIOS has probably turned it up automatically,
in response to the high clock.

If it was my system, I'd overclock it manually, only applying as
much voltage as is necessary, to run at the frequency. For example,
run at stock voltage, increase FSB in small steps, checking stability
with something other than my Windows hard drive. A Knoppix or Ubuntu
CD, for example. Or even memtest86+. When the processor shows signs
of instability, apply a small voltage increment, then go back to
small frequency increases. From the trend you get from those data
points, you should get some idea how much voltage is needed to get
to "X" frequency.

Eventually, you hit a wall, where a lot more voltage is needed.
And that is telling you, it is time to stop. Then back off to
a set of conditions, that you think can be applied for the life
of the processor (so-called "everyday overclock" value).

As a final check, boot from Knoppix or Ubuntu, go to mersenne.org,
and get a copy of Prime95. Use the Torture Test option, and see
if it runs error free for hours on end. There is also the Orthos
program, which runs multiple copies of Prime95. For a multicore
processor, you want to run a Prime95 thread per core, to get
the maximum degree of testing. If you can pass Prime95 under those
conditions, only then would I plug my Windows hard drive back in
and try booting from it.

A Windows hard drive can be corrupted, from overclocking experiments,
so you run the risk of losing the boot drive. Which is why you
need to find a bulletproof bootable OS, such as a Linux Live CD.
By booting from a CD, and having no hard drive present, there is
nothing to corrupt.

Paul
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Eric Parker
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-08-2007, 08:02 AM

"Paul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:f9br5n$nul$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Lowly Engineer wrote:
>> I have a 6850 in an ASUS P5B-E. I haven't messed around with it too
>> much but it is stable at 3.825 GHz. In BIOS, I have Vcore set to
>> 'AUTO'. CPU-Z reports the voltage as
>> 1.225, while ASUS probe reports it at 1.54V.
>>
>> Which is correct?
>>
>> TIA

>
> CPUZ could be reporting the nominal voltage (like from a register
> inside the processor). Asus Probe is more likely to be using the
> hardware monitor. I'd say that Asus Probe is giving you the real
> scoop.
>
> Why the voltage got that high, depends on how you are overclocking.
> If you use manual overclocking techniques, then it is up to you
> to turn it up that high. If using some of the automatic overclocking
> techniques, then the BIOS has probably turned it up automatically,
> in response to the high clock.
>


Lowly Engineer could easily prove this auto voltage adjustment by
winding down his clock and measuring again.
I'd be quite curious to know if that was going on.


Eric

--
Remove the dross to contact me directly


 
Reply With Quote
 
John Whitworth
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-08-2007, 09:51 PM

"Lowly Engineer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> I have a 6850 in an ASUS P5B-E. I haven't messed around with it too
> much but it is stable at 3.825 GHz.


I thought that was a windup to start with! I started thinking of the old
Motorola 68xx CPUs! ;-)

JW


 
Reply With Quote
 
Stephen
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-09-2007, 03:16 PM
On Wed, 8 Aug 2007 22:51:04 +0100, "John Whitworth"
<(E-Mail Removed)> had a flock of green cheek conures squawk
out:

>
>"Lowly Engineer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news(E-Mail Removed).. .
>>
>> I have a 6850 in an ASUS P5B-E. I haven't messed around with it too
>> much but it is stable at 3.825 GHz.

>
>I thought that was a windup to start with! I started thinking of the old
>Motorola 68xx CPUs! ;-)
>


A 6850 is a chip used for a serial port.

Stephen
--
 
Reply With Quote
 
Lowly Engineer
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-09-2007, 11:02 PM

Well, the serial port chip sure make my computer run fast, then!

Actually, it is an E6850 - 3.0GHz, 1333 Mhz FSB


On Thu, 09 Aug 2007 15:16:36 GMT, Stephen <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Wed, 8 Aug 2007 22:51:04 +0100, "John Whitworth"
><(E-Mail Removed)> had a flock of green cheek conures squawk
>out:
>
>>
>>"Lowly Engineer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>news(E-Mail Removed). ..
>>>
>>> I have a 6850 in an ASUS P5B-E. I haven't messed around with it too
>>> much but it is stable at 3.825 GHz.

>>
>>I thought that was a windup to start with! I started thinking of the old
>>Motorola 68xx CPUs! ;-)
>>

>
>A 6850 is a chip used for a serial port.
>
>Stephen


 
Reply With Quote
 
John Whitworth
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-13-2007, 06:46 PM

"Stephen" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Wed, 8 Aug 2007 22:51:04 +0100, "John Whitworth"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> had a flock of green cheek conures squawk
> out:
>
>>
>>"Lowly Engineer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>news(E-Mail Removed). ..
>>>
>>> I have a 6850 in an ASUS P5B-E. I haven't messed around with it too
>>> much but it is stable at 3.825 GHz.

>>
>>I thought that was a windup to start with! I started thinking of the old
>>Motorola 68xx CPUs! ;-)
>>

>
> A 6850 is a chip used for a serial port.


I didn't check. It just made me *think* of the 6809 in my old Dragon, and
all of the 68xx series chips that went with it!

JW


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vcore voltage max for T-bred 1800+ ? GargoyleBG Abit 3 01-21-2004 08:23 PM
Vcore still adjustable? Wblane Abit 3 01-16-2004 06:20 PM
NF7-S Vcore - What is the range? Mark W. Everly Abit 3 12-20-2003 11:43 AM
NF7-S: Does this Motherboard Undervolt Vcore? (300w Antec PSU). Wayne Youngman Abit 18 09-22-2003 02:39 AM
Vcore Ebzdex Abit 0 08-07-2003 06:46 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:12 AM.


Welcome!
Welcome to Motherboard Point
 

Advertisment