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Re: Any ideas why my new RAM won't work?

 
 
Mike Walsh
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      09-07-2008, 04:27 PM


David wrote:
>
> On Sat, 06 Sep 2008 10:06:13 -0600, Ken <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >You should download the complete manual on your MB if you have not
> >already done so. Some MBs will not accept what is called high density
> >RAM. That is determined most often by how many ICs are on each stick.
> >This could be your problem. Get all the info possible before coming to
> >any conclusions.

>
> Thanks to all those who responded. Taking it back to the shop is a
> last alternative, as I didn't buy them in my own town, and it's a bit
> tricky getting back. But that's by the by. This concept of high and
> low density is completely new to me, and I thought I'd make this my
> first avenue of investigation.
>
> I found from the internet the LOW is 64x8 and HIGH is 128x8. I don't
> understand how these figures related to 256, but ignoring that for the
> moment, it rung a bell. I HAVE seen (eg) 64x8 mentioned on an (old)
> ram stick before, in amongst all the various serial nos. on the
> sticker (sometimes several stickers!)
>
> Unfortunately there is no such indication on these new sticks. I've
> also spent a good half an hour browsing the net with the serial
> number, and yes, I found dozens and dozens of references (usually from
> shops!) but whilst they all said SDRAM, PC133 etc., not one single
> person mentioned if it was a high or low density item.
>
> I'm feeling right now that they must be high, and that my motherboard
> does not cater for them (will start my search for a manual to confirm
> that shortly) but all the same, I'd love to know if there is any other
> way I can tell high from low? (In case I ever buy ram in the future,
> new or used, and it doesn't say which).


High density and low density are relative terms. A chip that was considered high density a few years ago is now considered low density. A rule of thumb is a DIMM with 8 chips is considered low density (relative to the motherboard) and a DIMM with 4 or 2 chips is high density.

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Mike Walsh
 
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jaster
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      09-07-2008, 06:05 PM
On Sun, 07 Sep 2008 12:27:01 -0400, Mike Walsh thoughfully wrote:

> David wrote:
>>
>> On Sat, 06 Sep 2008 10:06:13 -0600, Ken <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>> >You should download the complete manual on your MB if you have not
>> >already done so. Some MBs will not accept what is called high density
>> >RAM. That is determined most often by how many ICs are on each stick.
>> >This could be your problem. Get all the info possible before coming
>> >to any conclusions.

>>
>> Thanks to all those who responded. Taking it back to the shop is a last
>> alternative, as I didn't buy them in my own town, and it's a bit tricky
>> getting back. But that's by the by. This concept of high and low
>> density is completely new to me, and I thought I'd make this my first
>> avenue of investigation.
>>
>> I found from the internet the LOW is 64x8 and HIGH is 128x8. I don't
>> understand how these figures related to 256, but ignoring that for the
>> moment, it rung a bell. I HAVE seen (eg) 64x8 mentioned on an (old) ram
>> stick before, in amongst all the various serial nos. on the sticker
>> (sometimes several stickers!)
>>
>> Unfortunately there is no such indication on these new sticks. I've
>> also spent a good half an hour browsing the net with the serial number,
>> and yes, I found dozens and dozens of references (usually from shops!)
>> but whilst they all said SDRAM, PC133 etc., not one single person
>> mentioned if it was a high or low density item.
>>
>> I'm feeling right now that they must be high, and that my motherboard
>> does not cater for them (will start my search for a manual to confirm
>> that shortly) but all the same, I'd love to know if there is any other
>> way I can tell high from low? (In case I ever buy ram in the future,
>> new or used, and it doesn't say which).

>
> High density and low density are relative terms. A chip that was
> considered high density a few years ago is now considered low density. A
> rule of thumb is a DIMM with 8 chips is considered low density (relative
> to the motherboard) and a DIMM with 4 or 2 chips is high density.


Number of chips does not indicate density.
 
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