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Re: Gigabyte GA M55SLI S4 v2 underclocking question

 
 
Paul
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      08-14-2008, 01:57 AM
Don wrote:
> I just installed Everest Ultimate monitor & diagnostic program, and
> noticed that my Athlon 64 X2 5600+ (2800 MHz) is running at 1005 MHz and
> the clock multiplier is at 5x instead of 14x. I went into the Bios to
> the MB Intelligent Tweaker, and the CPU frequency, PCIE Clock, and CPU
> clock ratio were all set on Auto, which supposedly optimizes
> performance. Is this type of setup going to increase the ratio when
> demand goes up?
>
> I manually set the Frequency at 200 MHz and the multiplier at 14x, and
> the temp went up by 22 degrees C and the computer didn't seem any
> faster, so I reset back to Auto.
>
> I'm running Vista Business 64 bit with 6 GB of RAM. If I want the best
> performance, should I upgrade my cooling system and manually set the
> freq and multiplier?
>
> I've never messed with overclocking, because I use the computer for
> research and mapmaking, and stability has been secondary to speed - but
> I want all the speed I can reasonably expect.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Don


Cool N' Quiet is a technology similar to Intel EIST, that adjusts
the core frequency and Vcore voltage. I.e. 200 x 5 might be used,
if the OS detects no application loading. If you run something that
uses 100% CPU, then the multiplier will be adjusted to 200 x 14,
increasing the core frequency. The VID (which controls Vcore) is also
adjusted, to help the processor run at the new speed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cool%27n%27Quiet (AMD)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SpeedStep (Intel)

If there is a Cool N' Quiet setting in the BIOS, you could
temporarily try disabling it, and see if the frequency reads 200 x 14
all the time.

Or alternately, you could run a program like the Prime95 torture test,
as a means to get the CPU loaded to 100%. This version will run a
thread per core. When prompted to register, answer "no", as all
you want is the Torture Test. The defaults are good enough for
initial testing. If an error is detected, the testing thread will
stop. No errors are acceptable, on a properly operating computer.
Once the CPU is at 100% load, Cool N' Quiet should set the
multiplier at 14.

http://www.mersenne.org/gimps/p95v256.zip

The purpose of Cool N' Quiet, is to reduce the operating
power waste, when the system is idle.

Paul
 
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Paul
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      08-15-2008, 05:34 AM
Don wrote:
> Paul wrote:
>> Don wrote:
>>> I just installed Everest Ultimate monitor & diagnostic program, and
>>> noticed that my Athlon 64 X2 5600+ (2800 MHz) is running at 1005 MHz
>>> and the clock multiplier is at 5x instead of 14x. I went into the
>>> Bios to the MB Intelligent Tweaker, and the CPU frequency, PCIE
>>> Clock, and CPU clock ratio were all set on Auto, which supposedly
>>> optimizes performance. Is this type of setup going to increase the
>>> ratio when demand goes up?
>>>
>>> I manually set the Frequency at 200 MHz and the multiplier at 14x,
>>> and the temp went up by 22 degrees C and the computer didn't seem any
>>> faster, so I reset back to Auto.
>>>
>>> I'm running Vista Business 64 bit with 6 GB of RAM. If I want the
>>> best performance, should I upgrade my cooling system and manually set
>>> the freq and multiplier?
>>>
>>> I've never messed with overclocking, because I use the computer for
>>> research and mapmaking, and stability has been secondary to speed -
>>> but I want all the speed I can reasonably expect.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> Don

>>
>> Cool N' Quiet is a technology similar to Intel EIST, that adjusts
>> the core frequency and Vcore voltage. I.e. 200 x 5 might be used,
>> if the OS detects no application loading. If you run something that
>> uses 100% CPU, then the multiplier will be adjusted to 200 x 14,
>> increasing the core frequency. The VID (which controls Vcore) is also
>> adjusted, to help the processor run at the new speed.
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cool%27n%27Quiet (AMD)
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SpeedStep (Intel)
>>
>> If there is a Cool N' Quiet setting in the BIOS, you could
>> temporarily try disabling it, and see if the frequency reads 200 x 14
>> all the time.
>>
>> Or alternately, you could run a program like the Prime95 torture test,
>> as a means to get the CPU loaded to 100%. This version will run a
>> thread per core. When prompted to register, answer "no", as all
>> you want is the Torture Test. The defaults are good enough for
>> initial testing. If an error is detected, the testing thread will
>> stop. No errors are acceptable, on a properly operating computer.
>> Once the CPU is at 100% load, Cool N' Quiet should set the
>> multiplier at 14.
>>
>> http://www.mersenne.org/gimps/p95v256.zip
>>
>> The purpose of Cool N' Quiet, is to reduce the operating
>> power waste, when the system is idle.
>>
>> Paul

>
> OK, I installed Prime95, ran the torture test, and both cores went up to
> 100%, but with Everest open to one side of the monitor, I can see that
> the system is still operating at 1005.2 MHz and the multiplier is at
> 5.0x. I tried turning off Cool N' Quiet, and tried opening some large
> (120 MB) jpg files in photoshop, and got less that 2 seconds compared to
> almost 6 seconds with Cool N' Quiet on. I have a Athlon x2 4200+ on my
> school computer and it is working as you described with Cool N' Quiet
> but not this one.
>
> Don


I've heard of this happening before, but I'm not sure what the cure is.
The poster solved it on his own, and didn't know what changed to make
it work.

So are you saying, with CNQ disabled, that the clock rate is correct (200 x 14) ?
Or still too low (200 x 5) ?

I wonder if the BIOS is recent enough for the processor you are using ?

As far as I know, there is some communications via ACPI objects. The
BIOS may pass details about the processor to the OS, via ACPI tables.
Maybe something there isn't working right.

I could probably make up some ways to artificially fix it. Maybe you could
set the multiplier in the BIOS (to 14). Or maybe you could go to Power control
panel in Windows, and change the Power Management scheme to "Always On" or
whatever passes for the "high powered" option in your Power panel. The idea
here, is to disable CNQ, and always run the processor with a 14X multiplier.

The user manual for some of the early CNQ capable motherboards, included
instructions on installing CNQ. The text here is apparently from an
A8N-SLI manual. There might even be a separate PDF document around,
containing similar information. There are a few steps to making CNQ work,
such as one or more BIOS settings, Power scheme in Windows, AMD downloadable
driver, and an OS install where the Device Manager "Computer" entry properties,
mention ACPI in the name of the HAL.

http://groups.google.ca/group/alt.co...b?dmode=source

RMClock is another tool for messing around with the properties of CNQ, but
I'm not sure at this point, that you'd gain anything by using it. Whatever
is preventing correct operation for you with the AMD driver, would probably
still be an issue for RMClock.

Oh, another tool for checking properties, is CPUZ from cpuid.com . Check the
frequency there. As a double check that Everest is OK.

http://www.cpuid.com/cpuz.php

Paul
 
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