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Re: Using a USB thumb drive for backups?

 
 
nospam
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      12-18-2009, 07:22 PM
In article <isw-AC315E.10332418122009@[216.168.3.50]>, isw
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Not with Time Machine, but with "backuplist+", which does them once a
> week.
>
> Pros/cons?


maybe for a few files, but when i think of backups, i think of where to
put several hundred gigabytes.
 
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Nick Naym
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      12-19-2009, 03:40 AM
In article 181220091422276843%(E-Mail Removed), nospam at
(E-Mail Removed)d wrote on 12/18/09 2:22 PM:

> In article <isw-AC315E.10332418122009@[216.168.3.50]>, isw
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Not with Time Machine, but with "backuplist+", which does them once a
>> week.
>>
>> Pros/cons?

>
> maybe for a few files, but when i think of backups, i think of where to
> put several hundred gigabytes.



I wonder why no one has addressed this. And if one is only talking about a
handful of files (especially infrequently), what's the advantage of using
"backup" software over simply drag-and-dropping copies?


--
iMac (24", 2.8 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 2GB RAM, 320 GB HDD) OS X (10.5.8)

 
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Tim Murray
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      12-19-2009, 05:13 AM
Nick Naym wrote:
> I wonder why no one has addressed this. And if one is only talking about a
> handful of files (especially infrequently), what's the advantage of using
> "backup" software over simply drag-and-dropping copies?


Actually there is an advantage in the most backup apps have an option to
verify that the backup had no errors, more than the OS will do.

 
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nospam
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      12-19-2009, 05:51 AM
In article <isw-C0CD34.21281918122009@[216.168.3.50]>, isw
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > I wonder why no one has addressed this. And if one is only talking about a
> > handful of files (especially infrequently), what's the advantage of using
> > "backup" software over simply drag-and-dropping copies?

>
> It's on the Mac of a barely-capable user who works with critical
> (financial) data (she understands the finances; just not the computer),
> and so absolutely cannot be trusted to do any backing up in a reliable
> fashion. The backup app launches at login, and runs continuously, waking
> up once a week to copy the folders I told it to copy.


the perfect candidate for time machine.
 
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Michael Vilain
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      12-19-2009, 07:24 AM
In article <tph-7E4F37.23571618122009@localhost>,
Tom Harrington <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> In article <isw-C0CD34.21281918122009@[216.168.3.50]>,
> isw <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > It's on the Mac of a barely-capable user who works with critical
> > (financial) data (she understands the finances; just not the computer),
> > and so absolutely cannot be trusted to do any backing up in a reliable
> > fashion. The backup app launches at login, and runs continuously, waking
> > up once a week to copy the folders I told it to copy.

>
> Sounds like a candidate for Dropbox, <http://www.dropbox.com/>.
>
> Have her put the files in the Dropbox folder, and the software will
> silently mirror it to a Dropbox account (and optionally to other
> computers) whenever it changes. She doesn't need to "do" backups,
> they'll just happen, and if/when disaster strikes the files are easily
> recoverable.


I looked at Dropbox but it triggered my "to good to be true" spidey
sense. They collect some overly nosey personal information and have
access to the data that's being backed up. Not OK with me.

Even though it's free now, what about later? Holding my photos hostage
until you got some money is one thing (this happened with a photo
storage site and a state AG had to whisper the words "RICO" to the CEO
for them to rethink their monetizing strategy). My back data quite
another.

For someone who's not so sensitive to such things, Dropbox might be OK.
If this technically unsophisticated user can't be trained to take care
of themselves and their data, they need to hire someone to make sure it
gets done. It would be irresponsible to do anything else.

--
DeeDee, don't press that button! DeeDee! NO! Dee...
[I filter all Goggle Groups posts, so any reply may be automatically by ignored]


 
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Nick Naym
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      12-19-2009, 08:48 AM
In article isw-C0CD34.21281918122009@[216.168.3.50], isw at (E-Mail Removed)
wrote on 12/19/09 12:28 AM:

> In article <C751B545.4DDAD%nicknaym@[remove_this].gmail.com>,
> Nick Naym <nicknaym@[remove_this].gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> In article 181220091422276843%(E-Mail Removed), nospam at
>> (E-Mail Removed)d wrote on 12/18/09 2:22 PM:
>>
>>> In article <isw-AC315E.10332418122009@[216.168.3.50]>, isw
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Not with Time Machine, but with "backuplist+", which does them once a
>>>> week.
>>>>
>>>> Pros/cons?
>>>
>>> maybe for a few files, but when i think of backups, i think of where to
>>> put several hundred gigabytes.

>>
>>
>> I wonder why no one has addressed this. And if one is only talking about a
>> handful of files (especially infrequently), what's the advantage of using
>> "backup" software over simply drag-and-dropping copies?

>
> It's on the Mac of a barely-capable user who works with critical
> (financial) data (she understands the finances; just not the computer),
> and so absolutely cannot be trusted to do any backing up in a reliable
> fashion. The backup app launches at login, and runs continuously, waking
> up once a week to copy the folders I told it to copy.
>
> To be clear, her method for dealing with technology is just like her
> method for dealing with children: shake a finger and sternly say "you'd
> better not do that!"
>
> Which, of course, works just as well for one as for the other.
>
> Isaac



Been watching too many old Henny Youngman routines?

--
iMac (24", 2.8 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 2GB RAM, 320 GB HDD) OS X (10.5.8)

 
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Warren Oates
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      12-19-2009, 01:25 PM
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Michael Vilain <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> For someone who's not so sensitive to such things, Dropbox might be OK.
> If this technically unsophisticated user can't be trained to take care
> of themselves and their data, they need to hire someone to make sure it
> gets done. It would be irresponsible to do anything else.


.... and anyway, her machine can be set up with rsync and cron to back
stuff up every couple of hours. Dropbox actually sounds scary. All your
stuff are belong to us.
--
Very old woody beets will never cook tender.
-- Fannie Farmer
 
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nospam
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      12-19-2009, 07:00 PM
In article <isw-B7459D.10253819122009@[216.168.3.50]>, isw
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> On a G4 mini, which can't run Leopard because it has to run some legacy
> "Classic" apps. And there's no chance the user could handle SheepShaver.


which ones? is there really no osx native replacement?
 
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Warren Oates
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      12-19-2009, 08:59 PM
In article <isw-919C56.10235519122009@[216.168.3.50]>,
isw <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> I agree completely. I want my stuff on *my* servers where *I* can get it
> -- or more importantly, destroy it -- whenever *I* want to.


On the other hand, Wuala seems maybe secure -- your data is encrypted
before it goes, or something.

http://www.wuala.com/
--
Very old woody beets will never cook tender.
-- Fannie Farmer
 
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E Z Peaces
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      12-20-2009, 01:53 AM
isw wrote:
> In article <tph-7E4F37.23571618122009@localhost>,
> Tom Harrington <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> In article <isw-C0CD34.21281918122009@[216.168.3.50]>,
>> isw <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> It's on the Mac of a barely-capable user who works with critical
>>> (financial) data (she understands the finances; just not the computer),
>>> and so absolutely cannot be trusted to do any backing up in a reliable
>>> fashion. The backup app launches at login, and runs continuously, waking
>>> up once a week to copy the folders I told it to copy.

>> Sounds like a candidate for Dropbox, <http://www.dropbox.com/>.
>>
>> Have her put the files in the Dropbox folder, and the software will
>> silently mirror it to a Dropbox account (and optionally to other
>> computers) whenever it changes. She doesn't need to "do" backups,
>> they'll just happen, and if/when disaster strikes the files are easily
>> recoverable.

>
> backuplist+ works without intervention (once I set it up); I'm just
> looking for the best option for external storage. I'm leaning heavily
> towards a 2 or 4 Gig USB Thumbdrive at this time.
>
> Isaac


I've been wondering for some time if flash memory could be ideal for
backup. Disks and optical media can go bad on the shelf.

For $900 extra, one can buy a Macbook Air with flash storage instead of
a disk. Apparently Apple has confidence that flash memory can be
reliable in heavy use.

Some brands of thumb drives aren't nearly as reliable as others, but the
biggest cause of data loss seems to be unplugging without first
unmounting. They're cheap enough that I would alternate backups between
two thumb drives.
 
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