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7 Questions To Ask A Laptop Salesman

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by gary.hendricks.user@gmail.com, Oct 3, 2008.

  1. Guest

    I've got something to share about buying laptops - I hope it is useful
    to you guys in this forum.

    Have you ever been in an electronics store, hunting for a good laptop,
    and then approached by a salesman? Probably yes. Do you know what
    questions to ask the salesman, or do you just listen to him give a
    standard sales pitch and end up buying a laptop that doesn't suit your
    needs?

    Well, God forbid, we shouldn't let such things happen. The following
    shows you the top 7 questions you need to ask a laptop salesman so you
    don't end up shelling out cash for features / laptop components you
    don't need.


    1. What's The CPU Inside?
    One of the most fundamental questions that any laptop salesman must be
    able to answer is the CPU used by the laptop. As you might know, these
    days, the minimum CPU configuration a laptop must have is the Intel
    Core 2 Duo processor. Anything less than that, and we are looking at a
    (very likely) sub-standard laptop. So make sure you ask the salesman
    what CPU is used by the laptop. And he better have an answer.


    2. How Much Memory Does It Have?
    Another fundamental question is the amount of memory the laptop has.
    These days, most laptops have at least 1GB of RAM, and many have 2GB.
    This is the minimum to run Windows Vista reasonably well, so make sure
    you check out the amount of memory available.


    3. What Is the Screen Size And Weight?
    It's difficult to gauge the screen size of a laptop sometimes. Make
    sure you ask the laptop salesman what the screen size of the laptop
    is. Usually, we need about 12-inches to 14-inches for a decent laptop.
    Gaming or multimedia laptops might have screens as big as 17-inches.

    The weight of the laptop is another prime consideration. Besides
    testing out the heft of the machines, make sure that you ask the
    salesman the weight of the laptop. Is it inclusive of the battery pack
    or exclusive? Stuff like that should be clarified.


    4. What Are The Customization Options?
    If you have special needs that the out-of-the-box laptop cannot
    address, then ask the salesman about customization options. For
    example, you might ask the salesman if it is possible to add an extra
    2GB of RAM to the laptop. If you're into video editing, does the
    laptop come with Firewire ports or a card reader? Perhaps the basic
    laptop configuration doesn't have these, but a customized
    configuration might have it.


    5. How Much Does A Replacement Battery Cost?
    If you're like me, I always buy an extra battery for my laptops. The
    thing is, you don't want the laptop to run out of juice when you're on
    the road and have no access to a power socket. So always check with
    the salesman what is the cost of an extra laptop battery. These can
    usually cost a lot of money, so they can add to the overall cost of
    ownership of your machine.


    6. What Is The Warranty Policy?
    Another important thing to check is obviously the warranty policy of
    the laptop. Does the manufacturer cover the machine for 1 year, 3
    years or 5 years? Or do they have a lifetime warranty policy? What
    about dead pixels on the laptop screen, or defective software? Do
    these get covered in the warranty policy? Check these with the
    salesman before you pay for the laptop.


    7. What Software Comes Pre-Installed?
    Very often, we assume that a laptop comes with Windows Vista,
    Microsoft Office and other productivity suites all pre-configured.
    That's not always the case. Most laptop manufacturers just install
    Windows Vista and do not include stuff like Microsoft Office - which
    you need to purchase separately on your own.


    I hope the above has given you some good insight into the top 7
    questions to ask a laptop salesman. If you make sure you run through
    this list of questions each time you hunt for a laptop, I'd guarantee
    you can find a laptop to suit you needs. So good luck and until next
    time, happy laptop shopping!
     
    , Oct 3, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Pete D Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I've got something to share about buying laptops - I hope it is useful
    > to you guys in this forum.
    >
    > Have you ever been in an electronics store, hunting for a good laptop,
    > and then approached by a salesman? Probably yes. Do you know what
    > questions to ask the salesman, or do you just listen to him give a
    > standard sales pitch and end up buying a laptop that doesn't suit your
    > needs?
    >
    > Well, God forbid, we shouldn't let such things happen. The following
    > shows you the top 7 questions you need to ask a laptop salesman so you
    > don't end up shelling out cash for features / laptop components you
    > don't need.
    >
    >
    > 1. What's The CPU Inside?
    > One of the most fundamental questions that any laptop salesman must be
    > able to answer is the CPU used by the laptop. As you might know, these
    > days, the minimum CPU configuration a laptop must have is the Intel
    > Core 2 Duo processor. Anything less than that, and we are looking at a
    > (very likely) sub-standard laptop. So make sure you ask the salesman
    > what CPU is used by the laptop. And he better have an answer.
    >
    >
    > 2. How Much Memory Does It Have?
    > Another fundamental question is the amount of memory the laptop has.
    > These days, most laptops have at least 1GB of RAM, and many have 2GB.
    > This is the minimum to run Windows Vista reasonably well, so make sure
    > you check out the amount of memory available.
    >
    >
    > 3. What Is the Screen Size And Weight?
    > It's difficult to gauge the screen size of a laptop sometimes. Make
    > sure you ask the laptop salesman what the screen size of the laptop
    > is. Usually, we need about 12-inches to 14-inches for a decent laptop.
    > Gaming or multimedia laptops might have screens as big as 17-inches.
    >
    > The weight of the laptop is another prime consideration. Besides
    > testing out the heft of the machines, make sure that you ask the
    > salesman the weight of the laptop. Is it inclusive of the battery pack
    > or exclusive? Stuff like that should be clarified.
    >
    >
    > 4. What Are The Customization Options?
    > If you have special needs that the out-of-the-box laptop cannot
    > address, then ask the salesman about customization options. For
    > example, you might ask the salesman if it is possible to add an extra
    > 2GB of RAM to the laptop. If you're into video editing, does the
    > laptop come with Firewire ports or a card reader? Perhaps the basic
    > laptop configuration doesn't have these, but a customized
    > configuration might have it.
    >
    >
    > 5. How Much Does A Replacement Battery Cost?
    > If you're like me, I always buy an extra battery for my laptops. The
    > thing is, you don't want the laptop to run out of juice when you're on
    > the road and have no access to a power socket. So always check with
    > the salesman what is the cost of an extra laptop battery. These can
    > usually cost a lot of money, so they can add to the overall cost of
    > ownership of your machine.
    >
    >
    > 6. What Is The Warranty Policy?
    > Another important thing to check is obviously the warranty policy of
    > the laptop. Does the manufacturer cover the machine for 1 year, 3
    > years or 5 years? Or do they have a lifetime warranty policy? What
    > about dead pixels on the laptop screen, or defective software? Do
    > these get covered in the warranty policy? Check these with the
    > salesman before you pay for the laptop.
    >
    >
    > 7. What Software Comes Pre-Installed?
    > Very often, we assume that a laptop comes with Windows Vista,
    > Microsoft Office and other productivity suites all pre-configured.
    > That's not always the case. Most laptop manufacturers just install
    > Windows Vista and do not include stuff like Microsoft Office - which
    > you need to purchase separately on your own.
    >
    >
    > I hope the above has given you some good insight into the top 7
    > questions to ask a laptop salesman. If you make sure you run through
    > this list of questions each time you hunt for a laptop, I'd guarantee
    > you can find a laptop to suit you needs. So good luck and until next
    > time, happy laptop shopping!


    You can't count, that was 8 questions.
     
    Pete D, Oct 3, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Pete D wrote:

    >> time, happy laptop shopping!

    >
    > You can't count, that was 8 questions.
    >


    >


    Let's see, there're 3 types of people in the world. The ones who can
    count, and the ones who can't.
     
    Airman Thunderbird, Oct 4, 2008
    #3
  4. BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    typed on Fri, 3 Oct 2008 06:29:15 -0700
    (PDT):
    > 1. What's The CPU Inside?
    > One of the most fundamental questions that any laptop salesman must be
    > able to answer is the CPU used by the laptop. As you might know, these
    > days, the minimum CPU configuration a laptop must have is the Intel
    > Core 2 Duo processor. Anything less than that, and we are looking at a
    > (very likely) sub-standard laptop. So make sure you ask the salesman
    > what CPU is used by the laptop. And he better have an answer.
    >
    >
    > 2. How Much Memory Does It Have?
    > Another fundamental question is the amount of memory the laptop has.
    > These days, most laptops have at least 1GB of RAM, and many have 2GB.
    > This is the minimum to run Windows Vista reasonably well, so make sure
    > you check out the amount of memory available.
    >
    >
    > 3. What Is the Screen Size And Weight?
    > It's difficult to gauge the screen size of a laptop sometimes. Make
    > sure you ask the laptop salesman what the screen size of the laptop
    > is. Usually, we need about 12-inches to 14-inches for a decent laptop.
    > Gaming or multimedia laptops might have screens as big as 17-inches.
    >
    > The weight of the laptop is another prime consideration. Besides
    > testing out the heft of the machines, make sure that you ask the
    > salesman the weight of the laptop. Is it inclusive of the battery pack
    > or exclusive? Stuff like that should be clarified.
    >
    >
    > 4. What Are The Customization Options?
    > If you have special needs that the out-of-the-box laptop cannot
    > address, then ask the salesman about customization options. For
    > example, you might ask the salesman if it is possible to add an extra
    > 2GB of RAM to the laptop. If you're into video editing, does the
    > laptop come with Firewire ports or a card reader? Perhaps the basic
    > laptop configuration doesn't have these, but a customized
    > configuration might have it.
    >
    >
    > 5. How Much Does A Replacement Battery Cost?
    > If you're like me, I always buy an extra battery for my laptops. The
    > thing is, you don't want the laptop to run out of juice when you're on
    > the road and have no access to a power socket. So always check with
    > the salesman what is the cost of an extra laptop battery. These can
    > usually cost a lot of money, so they can add to the overall cost of
    > ownership of your machine.
    >
    >
    > 6. What Is The Warranty Policy?
    > Another important thing to check is obviously the warranty policy of
    > the laptop. Does the manufacturer cover the machine for 1 year, 3
    > years or 5 years? Or do they have a lifetime warranty policy? What
    > about dead pixels on the laptop screen, or defective software? Do
    > these get covered in the warranty policy? Check these with the
    > salesman before you pay for the laptop.
    >
    >
    > 7. What Software Comes Pre-Installed?
    > Very often, we assume that a laptop comes with Windows Vista,
    > Microsoft Office and other productivity suites all pre-configured.
    > That's not always the case. Most laptop manufacturers just install
    > Windows Vista and do not include stuff like Microsoft Office - which
    > you need to purchase separately on your own.
    >
    >
    > I hope the above has given you some good insight into the top 7
    > questions to ask a laptop salesman. If you make sure you run through
    > this list of questions each time you hunt for a laptop, I'd guarantee
    > you can find a laptop to suit you needs. So good luck and until next
    > time, happy laptop shopping!


    1) Naw... computer technology doubles every 18 months. Many of us doesn't
    need some fancy dual core processor. A simple low power, low heat Celeron
    does just fine. As Asus has sold millions of laptops with just Celerons
    within 12 months. I own 5 of them myself they are great little machines.
    They run cool and are long lasting with battery power. And on AC, less than
    20 watts.

    2 and 4) I am not a big fan of a lot of memory. As I have two machines with
    2GB of RAM and that is way too much for my needs. As I rarely need anything
    more than 1GB. And more RAM decreases portable power time.

    3) Naw... 12 to 14 inches is very large in my book and adds a lot of weight
    to a laptop. I have no problem seeing a 7 to 9 inch display 4 to 20 inches
    away. Although I am very nearsighted too. If you are farsighted, you might
    need those larger screens because you have to have them so far away from
    your eyes.

    5) Batteries are very cheap for the laptops I buy. Brand new 4 hour
    batteries for my Gateway MX6124 only cost about 35 bucks on eBay (Gateway
    brand). For my Asus EEE laptops, about 55 bucks will get you a brand new 6
    hour battery.

    6) Warrantee? I like buying used or refurbished with little or no warrantee.
    And 12 laptops later, the earliest one died after 5 years of heavy use. The
    rest have never died yet. The oldest one is 24 years old and it still works
    fine. So if all of my laptops came with a 5 year warrantee, it wouldn't have
    changed anything in the last 24 years.

    7) Software bundle? Some people hate added software with their new laptop.
    Luckily my Gateways MX6124 laptops came with two recovery options. One with
    all of the junk that came stock and another option that just installs
    Windows with nothing else. Some people like OpenOffice better than MS
    Office, although I am not one of them. Also if you like MS Office, you
    probably bought it already and you don't need it when you buy a new laptop.
    As you will just pay extra for it anyway.

    --
    Bill
    Asus EEE PC 8GB
    Windows XP SP2 and Xandros Linux
     
    BillW50, Oct 4, 2008
    #4
  5. () wrote:
    > Have you ever been in an electronics store, hunting for a good laptop,
    > and then approached by a salesman? Probably yes. Do you know what
    > questions to ask the salesman, or do you just listen to him give a
    > standard sales pitch and end up buying a laptop that doesn't suit your
    > needs?


    > Well, God forbid, we shouldn't let such things happen. The following
    > shows you the top 7 questions you need to ask a laptop salesman so you
    > don't end up shelling out cash for features / laptop components you
    > don't need.

    (Snip)

    > 7. What Software Comes Pre-Installed?
    > Very often, we assume that a laptop comes with Windows Vista,
    > Microsoft Office and other productivity suites all pre-configured.
    > That's not always the case. Most laptop manufacturers just install
    > Windows Vista and do not include stuff like Microsoft Office - which
    > you need to purchase separately on your own.


    *** If you will not be running Windows, ask if the store will refund
    the operating system cost if you buy it without the operating system
    installed.

    Richard
     
    Richard Bonner, Oct 5, 2008
    #5
  6. > Richard Bonner wrote:
    > > () wrote:
    > >> Have you ever been in an electronics store, hunting for a good laptop,
    > >> and then approached by a salesman? Probably yes. Do you know what
    > >> questions to ask the salesman, or do you just listen to him give a
    > >> standard sales pitch and end up buying a laptop that doesn't suit your
    > >> needs?

    > >
    > >> Well, God forbid, we shouldn't let such things happen. The following
    > >> shows you the top 7 questions you need to ask a laptop salesman so you
    > >> don't end up shelling out cash for features / laptop components you
    > >> don't need.

    > > (Snip)
    > >
    > >> 7. What Software Comes Pre-Installed?
    > >> Very often, we assume that a laptop comes with Windows Vista,
    > >> Microsoft Office and other productivity suites all pre-configured.
    > >> That's not always the case. Most laptop manufacturers just install
    > >> Windows Vista and do not include stuff like Microsoft Office - which
    > >> you need to purchase separately on your own.

    > >
    > > *** If you will not be running Windows, ask if the store will refund
    > > the operating system cost if you buy it without the operating system
    > > installed.
    > >
    > > Richard


    Barry Watzman () wrote:
    > No need to ask, they won't. EVER.


    > [Dell and some other OEMs might sell you a laptop without windows or
    > refund your money, but no "store" (e.g. retail store) will]


    *** That may vary from store to store and country to country. Computers
    that come from the factory with an operating system installed would not
    qualify, but for stores that install the operating system there, they may
    sell it blank. I must ask some local business about this...

    Richard Bonner
    http://www.chebucto.ca/~ak621/DOS/
     
    Richard Bonner, Oct 5, 2008
    #6
  7. M.I.5¾ Guest

    "Airman Thunderbird" <> wrote in message
    news:tUMFk.47632$...
    > Pete D wrote:
    >
    >>> time, happy laptop shopping!

    >>
    >> You can't count, that was 8 questions.

    >
    >>

    >
    > Let's see, there're 3 types of people in the world. The ones who can
    > count, and the ones who can't.


    That may be true, but there were 8 questions as Question 3 was 2 questions.
     
    M.I.5¾, Oct 6, 2008
    #7
  8. Pete D Guest

    "M.I.5¾" <_SPAM.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:48e9b866$...
    >
    > "Airman Thunderbird" <> wrote in message
    > news:tUMFk.47632$...
    >> Pete D wrote:
    >>
    >>>> time, happy laptop shopping!
    >>>
    >>> You can't count, that was 8 questions.

    >>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Let's see, there're 3 types of people in the world. The ones who can
    >> count, and the ones who can't.

    >
    > That may be true, but there were 8 questions as Question 3 was 2
    > questions.


    Indeed, reminds me that there are 10 types of people in the world, those
    that understand binary and those that don't!
     
    Pete D, Oct 6, 2008
    #8
  9. BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    AJL typed on Sun, 05 Oct 2008 10:24:24 -0700:
    > "BillW50" <> wrote:
    >
    >> A simple low power, low heat Celeron does just fine.
    >> As Asus has sold millions of laptops with just Celerons
    >> within 12 months.

    >
    > My Asus EeePC 2G Surf is the hottest (temperature hot) laptop I have.
    > That is the one thing I don't like about it. Reviews on the other
    > mini-laptops complain of the same thing so perhaps it's because of all
    > the parts being crammed into the small case.


    I have three 4G (701) and two 8G (702) EEE and all 5 of them the CPU runs
    132°F max. Which is a very low temperature for a CPU. I even blocked the air
    vents by placing them on a bed, maxed out the CPU for hours, and the
    temperature really doesn't change much on the EEE at all. Maybe the heat you
    feel is through the keyboard. As the keyboard is actually part of the heat
    sink. Which is a bit unorthodox, but it seems to work well. I even changed
    the fan speeds from 30% to 100% and it barely changes the temperature at
    all. And I am not sure if the fan is even doing much good. As it is on the
    wrong side of the motherboard to even help out the heat sink.

    --
    Bill
    Gateway MX6124 - Windows XP SP2
     
    BillW50, Oct 6, 2008
    #9
  10. BillW50 () wrote:

    > 6) Warrantee? I like buying used or refurbished with little or no warrantee.


    *** One often gets more bang for one's buck.


    > And 12 laptops later, the earliest one died after 5 years of heavy use. The
    > rest have never died yet. The oldest one is 24 years old and it still works
    > fine. So if all of my laptops came with a 5 year warrantee, it wouldn't have
    > changed anything in the last 24 years.


    *** 24 Years? 8088? 286?


    > 7) Software bundle? Some people hate added software with their new laptop.
    > --
    > Bill


    *** I am one of those people. I prefer to choose my own software.

    Richard Bonner
    http://www.chebucto.ca/~ak621/DOS/
     
    Richard Bonner, Oct 6, 2008
    #10
  11. BillW50 Guest

    In news:gcd0h4$6je$,
    Richard Bonner typed on Mon, 6 Oct 2008 12:32:37 +0000 (UTC):
    > BillW50 () wrote:
    >
    >> 6) Warrantee? I like buying used or refurbished with little or no
    >> warrantee.

    >
    > *** One often gets more bang for one's buck.


    Take this Gateway MX6124 for example. Back in 2006, some people paid $1599
    at BestBuy. Although I bought mine at TigerDirect in 2006 for $499
    refurbished. A year later I bought a used one on eBay for $200 to use in
    case I ever needs parts for my first one. So I paid half of what others have
    paid and I have two of them while they only have one.

    >> And 12 laptops later, the earliest one died after 5 years of heavy
    >> use. The rest have never died yet. The oldest one is 24 years old
    >> and it still works fine. So if all of my laptops came with a 5 year
    >> warrantee, it wouldn't have changed anything in the last 24 years.

    >
    > *** 24 Years? 8088? 286?


    Actually it ran a special version of an Z80 CPU I believe. It is an Epson
    PX-8 Geneva and it sported CP/M 2.2 in ROM. Booted up in like 5 seconds. It
    also had standby and that was instant on. Sported no fans and it ran very
    cool.

    >> 7) Software bundle? Some people hate added software with their new
    >> laptop. --
    >> Bill

    >
    > *** I am one of those people. I prefer to choose my own software.


    Yes I am not very impressed with bundled software 99% of the time either.

    --
    Bill
    Gateway MX6124 - Windows XP SP2
     
    BillW50, Oct 6, 2008
    #11
  12. BillW50 Guest

    AJL wrote on Mon, 06 Oct 2008 09:45:08 -0700:
    > "BillW50" <> wrote:
    >
    >> I have three 4G (701) and two 8G (702) EEE and all 5 of them the CPU runs
    >> 132°F max. Which is a very low temperature for a CPU.

    >
    > Unless you're measuring directly with an external thermometer (not
    > internal software) that may not be accurate. Also a large part of the
    > heat comes from other modules such as the wireless.


    True. I do have an inferred temperature detector which I could use to
    check. Also now that you had mentioned the wireless, that is indeed
    mounted on the bottom of the motherboard. Thus the fan does move a lot
    of air there. Are you far away from your wireless router? If so, the
    wireless card has to put out more power to communicate with it.

    >> Maybe the heat you feel is through the keyboard.

    >
    > The part I'm complaining about is the top and bottom covers. The LT is
    > so small and light that I often hold it up like a newspaper to read. I
    > hold the top cover below the keyboard and the bottom cover on the
    > opposite side. It becomes uncomfortable enough that I find myself
    > switching to holding the screen temporarily to cool my fingers off.


    Wow that sounds warm! None of mine ever get that warm.

    >> the fan speeds from 30% to 100% and it barely changes the temperature at
    >> all.

    >
    > In my 2G Surf the fan is either on or off. It seems to wait about 10
    > minutes and then turns on. It never turns off again until powerdown.


    Are you running under Linux? I have one EEE that starts up with the fan
    running at full speed. Under Linux, it never stops running at full
    speed. Although when I run Windows XP with that EEECTL utility, it drops
    down to 30% (very quiet) and stays there. The other four EEE doesn't do
    this, just that one. I haven't researched why, but my guess it must be
    the BIOS version. There are like 10 different BIOS versions for these
    things.

    >> And I am not sure if the fan is even doing much good. As it is on the
    >> wrong side of the motherboard to even help out the heat sink.

    >
    > It does help with my problem somewhat. The case becomes noticeably
    > cooler when the fan comes on, but still not cool enough.
    >
    > I've compared the case temperature (fingertip check only) to my other
    > laptops (HP Toshiba Acer) and none get even close to this warm. Ah
    > well, nothings ever perfect...


    Well I dunno why yours is so warm. I wouldn't think that the 2G models
    run hotter than the 4G or 8G models. And yours has 512MB of RAM, so that
    isn't causing the extra heat. Are you running things off of the USB
    ports? Using a large SD chip perhaps?

    Here is another thought. I generally run mine without a battery and on
    AC. Or on battery and without AC. I rarely use it on AC with the battery
    installed. And I noticed that virtually all laptops gets much warmer
    while using them and it is charging the battery at the same time.

    --
    Bill
    Black Asus EEE PC 4GB
    Xandros Linux
     
    BillW50, Oct 6, 2008
    #12
  13. BillW50 () wrote:
    > Richard Bonner typed on Mon, 6 Oct 2008 12:32:37 +0000 (UTC):


    > > BillW50 () wrote:
    > >> 7) Software bundle? Some people hate added software with their new
    > >> laptop. --
    > >> Bill


    > > *** I am one of those people. I prefer to choose my own software.


    > Yes I am not very impressed with bundled software 99% of the time either.
    > --
    > Bill


    *** I don't like the idea of paying for something I may or may not use.

    Richard Bonner
    http://www.chebucto.ca/~ak621/DOS/
     
    Richard Bonner, Oct 8, 2008
    #13
  14. BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    AJL typed on Tue, 14 Oct 2008 23:41:06 -0700:
    > AJL <> wrote:
    >
    >> "BillW50" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> A simple low power, low heat Celeron does just fine.
    >>> As Asus has sold millions of laptops with just Celerons
    >>> within 12 months.

    >>
    >> My Asus EeePC 2G Surf is the hottest (temperature hot) laptop I have.
    >> That is the one thing I don't like about it. Reviews on the other
    >> mini-laptops complain of the same thing so perhaps it's because of
    >> all the parts being crammed into the small case.

    >
    > If you're still around BillW50, I picked up an Eee PC 1000HD today
    > and it runs just slightly warm. So I guess the 2G Surf is just has a
    > hot (temperature) design.
    >
    > If anyone is interested, this Eee PC 1000HD has a 10" screen, XP, a
    > 900M Celeron M, 1G DDR2, and a 120G HDD. US$379.


    Yes I am still around. Although my two servers are flaky. And that is great
    news. I wonder why it runs so hot? I don't know of any Linux CPU temp
    monitor, but I would be curious to know what temp it believes it is running
    at.

    --
    Bill
    Asus EEE PC 8GB
    Windows XP SP2 and Xandros Linux
     
    BillW50, Oct 16, 2008
    #14
  15. Don Guest

    Richard Bonner wrote:
    > () wrote:
    >> Have you ever been in an electronics store, hunting for a good laptop,
    >> and then approached by a salesman? Probably yes. Do you know what
    >> questions to ask the salesman, or do you just listen to him give a
    >> standard sales pitch and end up buying a laptop that doesn't suit your
    >> needs?

    >
    >> Well, God forbid, we shouldn't let such things happen. The following
    >> shows you the top 7 questions you need to ask a laptop salesman so you
    >> don't end up shelling out cash for features / laptop components you
    >> don't need.

    > (Snip)
    >
    >> 7. What Software Comes Pre-Installed?
    >> Very often, we assume that a laptop comes with Windows Vista,
    >> Microsoft Office and other productivity suites all pre-configured.
    >> That's not always the case. Most laptop manufacturers just install
    >> Windows Vista and do not include stuff like Microsoft Office - which
    >> you need to purchase separately on your own.

    >
    > *** If you will not be running Windows, ask if the store will refund
    > the operating system cost if you buy it without the operating system
    > installed.
    >
    > Richard


    Be very careful with that one. If you buy a machine meant for Vista and
    you want to inxtall XP instead, drivers may be a big issue. Your laptop
    model may be so new that there are no XP drivers for some of the devices
    inside the box.
     
    Don, Oct 25, 2008
    #15
  16. Don Guest

    >
    > 1. What's The CPU Inside?
    > One of the most fundamental questions that any laptop salesman must be
    > able to answer is the CPU used by the laptop. As you might know, these
    > days, the minimum CPU configuration a laptop must have is the Intel
    > Core 2 Duo processor. Anything less than that, and we are looking at a
    > (very likely) sub-standard laptop. So make sure you ask the salesman
    > what CPU is used by the laptop. And he better have an answer.
    >

    What ever happened to AMD? They make multi-core processors for laptops.
     
    Don, Oct 25, 2008
    #16
  17. Don () wrote:
    > Richard Bonner wrote:
    > > *** If you will not be running Windows, ask if the store will refund
    > > the operating system cost if you buy it without the operating system
    > > installed.
    > >
    > > Richard


    > Be very careful with that one. If you buy a machine meant for Vista and
    > you want to inxtall XP instead, drivers may be a big issue. Your laptop
    > model may be so new that there are no XP drivers for some of the devices
    > inside the box.


    *** Good point. This is yet another reason the Microsoft monopoly needs
    to be broken up. Then we can back to more consumer choice.

    Richard Bonner
    http://www.chebucto.ca/~ak621/DOS/
     
    Richard Bonner, Nov 24, 2008
    #17
  18. BillW50 Guest

    Microsoft Monopoly [Re: 7 Questions To Ask A Laptop Salesman]

    Richard Bonner wrote on Mon, 24 Nov 2008 14:33:02 +0000 (UTC):
    > Don () wrote:
    >> Richard Bonner wrote:
    >>> *** If you will not be running Windows, ask if the store will refund
    >>> the operating system cost if you buy it without the operating system
    >>> installed.
    >>>
    >>> Richard

    >
    >> Be very careful with that one. If you buy a machine meant for Vista and
    >> you want to inxtall XP instead, drivers may be a big issue. Your laptop
    >> model may be so new that there are no XP drivers for some of the devices
    >> inside the box.

    >
    > *** Good point. This is yet another reason the Microsoft monopoly needs
    > to be broken up. Then we can back to more consumer choice.


    No, you need VirtualPC and not worry about drivers with older versions.
    All you need to do is to use your head. Simple eh?

    I just ran Ubuntu Eee 8.04.1 here last night and when I switched back to
    Windows XP, the registry was corrupt and the desktop was all screwed up.
    I thought that was strange and I restored it with ERUNT.

    Ran Ubuntu again and shut it down and ran Windows again. And guess what?
    Ubuntu corrupted the Windows registry once again. I did this a third
    time and the same thing.

    It is my belief that Microsoft is number one because their competitors
    are evil and stupid. I've seen this go on for decades. And Microsoft
    would have been taken out long ago except for this issue that befalls
    their competitors.

    --
    Bill
    Asus EEE PC 8GB 1GB SoDIMM Adata 16GB
    Windows XP SP2 and Xandros Linux
     
    BillW50, Nov 24, 2008
    #18
  19. Re: Microsoft Monopoly [Re: 7 Questions To Ask A Laptop Salesman]

    BillW50 () wrote:
    > Richard Bonner wrote on Mon, 24 Nov 2008 14:33:02 +0000 (UTC):
    > > Don () wrote:
    > >> Richard Bonner wrote:
    > >>> *** If you will not be running Windows, ask if the store will refund
    > >>> the operating system cost if you buy it without the operating system
    > >>> installed.
    > >>>
    > >>> Richard

    > >
    > >> Be very careful with that one. If you buy a machine meant for Vista and
    > >> you want to inxtall XP instead, drivers may be a big issue. Your laptop
    > >> model may be so new that there are no XP drivers for some of the devices
    > >> inside the box.

    > >
    > > *** Good point. This is yet another reason the Microsoft monopoly needs
    > > to be broken up. Then we can back to more consumer choice.


    > No, you need VirtualPC and not worry about drivers with older versions.
    > All you need to do is to use your head. Simple eh?


    > I just ran Ubuntu Eee 8.04.1 here last night and when I switched back to
    > Windows XP, the registry was corrupt and the desktop was all screwed up.
    > I thought that was strange and I restored it with ERUNT.


    > Ran Ubuntu again and shut it down and ran Windows again. And guess what?
    > Ubuntu corrupted the Windows registry once again. I did this a third
    > time and the same thing.


    > It is my belief that Microsoft is number one because their competitors
    > are evil and stupid. I've seen this go on for decades. And Microsoft
    > would have been taken out long ago except for this issue that befalls
    > their competitors.
    > --
    > Bill


    *** I won't argue against your opinion except to say that Microsoft in
    the past has been guilty of bullying competitors out of the market, and
    guilty of putting things into their products to mess up other operating
    systems. I would prefer real and honest competition.

    Richard Bonner
    http://www.chebucto.ca/~ak621/DOS/
     
    Richard Bonner, Dec 10, 2008
    #19
  20. BillW50 Guest

    Re: Microsoft Monopoly [Re: 7 Questions To Ask A Laptop Salesman]

    Richard Bonner wrote on Wed, 10 Dec 2008 19:39:43 +0000 (UTC):
    > BillW50 () wrote:
    >> Richard Bonner wrote on Mon, 24 Nov 2008 14:33:02 +0000 (UTC):
    >>> Don () wrote:
    >>>> Richard Bonner wrote:
    >>>>> *** If you will not be running Windows, ask if the store will refund
    >>>>> the operating system cost if you buy it without the operating system
    >>>>> installed.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Richard
    >>>> Be very careful with that one. If you buy a machine meant for Vista and
    >>>> you want to inxtall XP instead, drivers may be a big issue. Your laptop
    >>>> model may be so new that there are no XP drivers for some of the devices
    >>>> inside the box.
    >>> *** Good point. This is yet another reason the Microsoft monopoly needs
    >>> to be broken up. Then we can back to more consumer choice.

    >
    >> No, you need VirtualPC and not worry about drivers with older versions.
    >> All you need to do is to use your head. Simple eh?

    >
    >> I just ran Ubuntu Eee 8.04.1 here last night and when I switched back to
    >> Windows XP, the registry was corrupt and the desktop was all screwed up.
    >> I thought that was strange and I restored it with ERUNT.

    >
    >> Ran Ubuntu again and shut it down and ran Windows again. And guess what?
    >> Ubuntu corrupted the Windows registry once again. I did this a third
    >> time and the same thing.

    >
    >> It is my belief that Microsoft is number one because their competitors
    >> are evil and stupid. I've seen this go on for decades. And Microsoft
    >> would have been taken out long ago except for this issue that befalls
    >> their competitors.
    >> --
    >> Bill

    >
    > *** I won't argue against your opinion except to say that Microsoft in
    > the past has been guilty of bullying competitors out of the market, and
    > guilty of putting things into their products to mess up other operating
    > systems. I would prefer real and honest competition.


    That is because the competitors has done it to Microsoft. So are you the
    type who believes people and companies has no right to defend
    themselves? Also zillions of companies owes their very existence to what
    Microsoft has created. And if MS didn't battle it out with IBM, we all
    would be using IBM made computers and running IBM made software. And
    there would be nobody else around except perhaps Apple. Well Apple would
    be gone too since Microsoft gave Apple money to stay in business, but
    you know IBM wouldn't do that for Apple. So how many other competitors
    do you know that will give you money to stay in business? Nowadays Bill
    Gates is giving billions of dollars away to help people.

    --
    Bill
    3 Asus EEE PC 7014G ~ 2GB RAM ~ 16GB-SDHC
    2 Asus EEE PC 7028G ~ 1GB RAM ~ 16GB-SDHC
    Windows XP SP2 ~ Xandros Linux
     
    BillW50, Dec 10, 2008
    #20
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