Also Need Advice/Info on Replacing XPS P200s Power Supply

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Clueless, Feb 16, 2005.

  1. Clueless

    Clueless Guest

    Also need advice/info on replacing XPS P200s power supply as it makes
    whining noises also.

    Is there a replacement power supply available for such an old unit?
    Is there an alternative?

    Thanks again for advice/info.
    Clueless
     
    Clueless, Feb 16, 2005
    #1
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  2. Clueless

    Pen Guest

    Go here, get the docs, then remove the power supply.
    You can then measure the fan, probably 80mm, and replace it.
    Fans are cheap, even ball bearing ones.
    http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/dta/_trmntor/

    "Clueless" <> wrote in message
    news:1108592473.5e4576b90ad37f1b54534c5f49b7ed15@teranews...
    > Also need advice/info on replacing XPS P200s power supply as it makes
    > whining noises also.
    >
    > Is there a replacement power supply available for such an old unit?
    > Is there an alternative?
    >
    > Thanks again for advice/info.
    > Clueless
     
    Pen, Feb 17, 2005
    #2
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  3. Clueless

    Clueless Guest

    On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 20:12:53 -0500, "Pen" <> wrote:

    >Go here, get the docs, then remove the power supply.
    >You can then measure the fan, probably 80mm, and replace it.
    >Fans are cheap, even ball bearing ones.
    >http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/dta/_trmntor/


    Didn't know you can replace fan only. Thought it was "punched" in.
    Now I have another option in case the oiling method doesn't work.
    Thanks for the tip..... Clueless

    (How did you find the document? All my searches usually end up
    getting links to forum articles. :-( )

    >
    >"Clueless" <> wrote in message
    >news:1108592473.5e4576b90ad37f1b54534c5f49b7ed15@teranews...
    >> Also need advice/info on replacing XPS P200s power supply as it makes
    >> whining noises also.
    >>
    >> Is there a replacement power supply available for such an old unit?
    >> Is there an alternative?
    >>
    >> Thanks again for advice/info.
    >> Clueless
     
    Clueless, Feb 17, 2005
    #3
  4. Clueless

    Ben Myers Guest

    Usually, when you open up a power supply and examine the fan, you find that the
    wire leads for the fan are soldered onto the power supply's circuit board. If
    the leads are not soldered (rarely), then they attach with a connector not
    unlike the connector for a fan inside the chassis. Matching the connector of a
    replacement fan is a tricky proposition. So is soldering. What people do to
    replace a fan is to clip the wire leads near the fan, then splice the wires from
    the replacement fan to the wire leads, soldering and taping with electrical
    tape. The risk here is that the heat inside the power supply will eventually
    cause the electrical tape to come undone and a soldered joint shorts out and
    fries the power supply.

    The foregoing explains why power supplies, not power supply fans, are replaced
    almost universally throughout the industry. The exception may have to do with
    old obsolete gear where there is little choice except to repair a failed unit.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 20:33:07 -0700, Clueless <> wrote:

    >On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 20:12:53 -0500, "Pen" <> wrote:
    >
    >>Go here, get the docs, then remove the power supply.
    >>You can then measure the fan, probably 80mm, and replace it.
    >>Fans are cheap, even ball bearing ones.
    >>http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/dta/_trmntor/

    >
    >Didn't know you can replace fan only. Thought it was "punched" in.
    >Now I have another option in case the oiling method doesn't work.
    >Thanks for the tip..... Clueless
    >
    >(How did you find the document? All my searches usually end up
    >getting links to forum articles. :-( )
    >
    >>
    >>"Clueless" <> wrote in message
    >>news:1108592473.5e4576b90ad37f1b54534c5f49b7ed15@teranews...
    >>> Also need advice/info on replacing XPS P200s power supply as it makes
    >>> whining noises also.
    >>>
    >>> Is there a replacement power supply available for such an old unit?
    >>> Is there an alternative?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks again for advice/info.
    >>> Clueless

    >
     
    Ben Myers, Feb 17, 2005
    #4
  5. Clueless

    Clueless Guest

    On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 03:38:40 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    (Ben Myers) wrote:

    >Usually, when you open up a power supply and examine the fan, you find that the
    >wire leads for the fan are soldered onto the power supply's circuit board. If
    >the leads are not soldered (rarely), then they attach with a connector not
    >unlike the connector for a fan inside the chassis. Matching the connector of a
    >replacement fan is a tricky proposition. So is soldering. What people do to
    >replace a fan is to clip the wire leads near the fan, then splice the wires from
    >the replacement fan to the wire leads, soldering and taping with electrical
    >tape. The risk here is that the heat inside the power supply will eventually
    >cause the electrical tape to come undone and a soldered joint shorts out and
    >fries the power supply.


    That's the last thing I need - electrical fire. Once smelled burning
    old electric cord that resulted from a short caused by frayed, worn
    out insulation. Man that stunk! Thanks for the warning..... Clueless

    >
    >The foregoing explains why power supplies, not power supply fans, are replaced
    >almost universally throughout the industry. The exception may have to do with
    >old obsolete gear where there is little choice except to repair a failed unit.
    >
    >... Ben Myers
    >
    >On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 20:33:07 -0700, Clueless <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 20:12:53 -0500, "Pen" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Go here, get the docs, then remove the power supply.
    >>>You can then measure the fan, probably 80mm, and replace it.
    >>>Fans are cheap, even ball bearing ones.
    >>>http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/dta/_trmntor/

    >>
    >>Didn't know you can replace fan only. Thought it was "punched" in.
    >>Now I have another option in case the oiling method doesn't work.
    >>Thanks for the tip..... Clueless
    >>
    >>(How did you find the document? All my searches usually end up
    >>getting links to forum articles. :-( )
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"Clueless" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:1108592473.5e4576b90ad37f1b54534c5f49b7ed15@teranews...
    >>>> Also need advice/info on replacing XPS P200s power supply as it makes
    >>>> whining noises also.
    >>>>
    >>>> Is there a replacement power supply available for such an old unit?
    >>>> Is there an alternative?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks again for advice/info.
    >>>> Clueless

    >>
     
    Clueless, Feb 17, 2005
    #5
  6. Clueless

    Ben Myers Guest

    I'm not using scare tactics on you, either. It's not worth the time or the risk
    to try to replace a fan inside a power supply.

    If you want one or more Dell power supplies, contact me off-line via email:
    . I don't charge outrageous amounts and you exact
    shipping cost without any markup. MC, VISA, PayPal, cold hard cash accepted...
    Ben Myers

    On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 21:27:50 -0700, Clueless <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 03:38:40 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >
    >>Usually, when you open up a power supply and examine the fan, you find that the
    >>wire leads for the fan are soldered onto the power supply's circuit board. If
    >>the leads are not soldered (rarely), then they attach with a connector not
    >>unlike the connector for a fan inside the chassis. Matching the connector of a
    >>replacement fan is a tricky proposition. So is soldering. What people do to
    >>replace a fan is to clip the wire leads near the fan, then splice the wires from
    >>the replacement fan to the wire leads, soldering and taping with electrical
    >>tape. The risk here is that the heat inside the power supply will eventually
    >>cause the electrical tape to come undone and a soldered joint shorts out and
    >>fries the power supply.

    >
    >That's the last thing I need - electrical fire. Once smelled burning
    >old electric cord that resulted from a short caused by frayed, worn
    >out insulation. Man that stunk! Thanks for the warning..... Clueless
    >
    >>
    >>The foregoing explains why power supplies, not power supply fans, are replaced
    >>almost universally throughout the industry. The exception may have to do with
    >>old obsolete gear where there is little choice except to repair a failed unit.
    >>
    >>... Ben Myers
    >>
    >>On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 20:33:07 -0700, Clueless <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 20:12:53 -0500, "Pen" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Go here, get the docs, then remove the power supply.
    >>>>You can then measure the fan, probably 80mm, and replace it.
    >>>>Fans are cheap, even ball bearing ones.
    >>>>http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/dta/_trmntor/
    >>>
    >>>Didn't know you can replace fan only. Thought it was "punched" in.
    >>>Now I have another option in case the oiling method doesn't work.
    >>>Thanks for the tip..... Clueless
    >>>
    >>>(How did you find the document? All my searches usually end up
    >>>getting links to forum articles. :-( )
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>"Clueless" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:1108592473.5e4576b90ad37f1b54534c5f49b7ed15@teranews...
    >>>>> Also need advice/info on replacing XPS P200s power supply as it makes
    >>>>> whining noises also.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Is there a replacement power supply available for such an old unit?
    >>>>> Is there an alternative?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks again for advice/info.
    >>>>> Clueless
    >>>

    >
     
    Ben Myers, Feb 17, 2005
    #6
  7. Clueless

    Clueless Guest

    Sorry if I gave out any hint that I am not appreciative of your offer.
    Truth be told, deep down I was looking for excuses to finally junk the
    system that's been used as answering machine. Besides there are other
    little things that need attention, like cleaning corroded (?) power
    connector to the hard drive. Again, I appreciate the offer and the
    info you provided..... Clueless

    On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 13:37:32 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    (Ben Myers) wrote:

    >I'm not using scare tactics on you, either. It's not worth the time or the risk
    >to try to replace a fan inside a power supply.
    >
    >If you want one or more Dell power supplies, contact me off-line via email:
    > . I don't charge outrageous amounts and you exact
    >shipping cost without any markup. MC, VISA, PayPal, cold hard cash accepted...
    >Ben Myers
    >
    >On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 21:27:50 -0700, Clueless <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 03:38:40 GMT, ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net
    >>(Ben Myers) wrote:
    >>
    >>>Usually, when you open up a power supply and examine the fan, you find that the
    >>>wire leads for the fan are soldered onto the power supply's circuit board. If
    >>>the leads are not soldered (rarely), then they attach with a connector not
    >>>unlike the connector for a fan inside the chassis. Matching the connector of a
    >>>replacement fan is a tricky proposition. So is soldering. What people do to
    >>>replace a fan is to clip the wire leads near the fan, then splice the wires from
    >>>the replacement fan to the wire leads, soldering and taping with electrical
    >>>tape. The risk here is that the heat inside the power supply will eventually
    >>>cause the electrical tape to come undone and a soldered joint shorts out and
    >>>fries the power supply.

    >>
    >>That's the last thing I need - electrical fire. Once smelled burning
    >>old electric cord that resulted from a short caused by frayed, worn
    >>out insulation. Man that stunk! Thanks for the warning..... Clueless
    >>
    >>>
    >>>The foregoing explains why power supplies, not power supply fans, are replaced
    >>>almost universally throughout the industry. The exception may have to do with
    >>>old obsolete gear where there is little choice except to repair a failed unit.
    >>>
    >>>... Ben Myers
    >>>
    >>>On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 20:33:07 -0700, Clueless <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 20:12:53 -0500, "Pen" <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Go here, get the docs, then remove the power supply.
    >>>>>You can then measure the fan, probably 80mm, and replace it.
    >>>>>Fans are cheap, even ball bearing ones.
    >>>>>http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/dta/_trmntor/
    >>>>
    >>>>Didn't know you can replace fan only. Thought it was "punched" in.
    >>>>Now I have another option in case the oiling method doesn't work.
    >>>>Thanks for the tip..... Clueless
    >>>>
    >>>>(How did you find the document? All my searches usually end up
    >>>>getting links to forum articles. :-( )
    >>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>"Clueless" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>news:1108592473.5e4576b90ad37f1b54534c5f49b7ed15@teranews...
    >>>>>> Also need advice/info on replacing XPS P200s power supply as it makes
    >>>>>> whining noises also.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Is there a replacement power supply available for such an old unit?
    >>>>>> Is there an alternative?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Thanks again for advice/info.
    >>>>>> Clueless
    >>>>

    >>
     
    Clueless, Feb 17, 2005
    #7
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