1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

Any application that warns of high temperature?

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by bornfree, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. bornfree

    bornfree Guest

    I am literally going nuts over this.
    I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when my
    GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    (pop up box and sound would be nice)
     
    bornfree, Dec 4, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. bornfree

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'bornfree' wrote:
    | I am literally going nuts over this.
    | I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when my
    | GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    | reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    | (pop up box and sound would be nice)
    _____

    You do realize that 68 C is a relatively LOW temperature for a heavily
    loaded GPU? And that a system crash will occur if the GPU overheats enough
    to start throwing errors? And that upon a system crash the GPU will cool
    down?

    What graphics card(s), what operating system, what motherboard?

    nMonitor (a part of nTune by nVidia) has, among other functions, a
    temperature level at which a warning will occur. You can select the GPUs to
    be monitored (up to three), the alert threshold, and the type of warning
    (audio, visual, or message.) nMonitor will also log GPU events (changes to
    profile, temperatures, GPU usage, S.M.A.R.T status, and Bus speeds.) I
    don't know if the graphics card monitoring functions work if you don't have
    a motherboard by nVidia. Also functional problems have been reported with
    64-bit Vista.

    Phil Weldon

    "bornfree" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    |I am literally going nuts over this.
    | I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when my
    | GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    | reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    | (pop up box and sound would be nice)
     
    Phil Weldon, Dec 4, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. bornfree

    Dr.White Guest

    "bornfree" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am literally going nuts over this.
    > I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when my
    > GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    > reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    > (pop up box and sound would be nice)


    The latest beta version of speedfan, version 4.34 beta 36, includes
    monitoring of Nvidia chipset based cards along with cpu temperature, fan
    speed, and alarms, all that business. It's fully configurable, so you can
    set your alarm threshold temperatures and all manner of things. You'll
    probably have to install version 4.33 first, then go to the beta area and
    grab the latest beta file which is a replacement .exe for the main program.

    He seems like a very decent fellow too, the author. If you can take the time
    to hit the 'info' button and send him a report on your system, he will do
    his best to include support for your graphics card and mainboard, if the
    program doesn't already support it.

    http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php

    Regards,

    Dr.White.
     
    Dr.White, Dec 4, 2007
    #3
  4. bornfree

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh interweb Dr.White typed:
    > "bornfree" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I am literally going nuts over this.
    >> I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when my
    >> GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    >> reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    >> (pop up box and sound would be nice)

    >
    > The latest beta version of speedfan, version 4.34 beta 36, includes
    > monitoring of Nvidia chipset based cards along with cpu temperature,
    > fan speed, and alarms, all that business. It's fully configurable, so
    > you can set your alarm threshold temperatures and all manner of
    > things. You'll probably have to install version 4.33 first, then go
    > to the beta area and grab the latest beta file which is a replacement
    > .exe for the main program.
    > He seems like a very decent fellow too, the author. If you can take
    > the time to hit the 'info' button and send him a report on your
    > system, he will do his best to include support for your graphics card
    > and mainboard, if the program doesn't already support it.
    >
    > http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php


    Indeed. An excellent fellow. I'm using 4.33 (on an Intel P35) and it picks
    up my 7800GT as "nVidia Core" (currently 42°C). There is an option on one of
    the many tabs to set a threshold for high-temp warning.

    SpeedFan. I have it installed on all my machines. (Yet I've never used it
    for controlling fan speed, only for monitoring, especially the "Charts" tab
    for tracking temp changes).

    Ciao,
    --
    Shaun.
     
    ~misfit~, Dec 4, 2007
    #4
  5. bornfree

    treefrog Guest

    On Tue, 4 Dec 2007 10:48:08 -0500, "Phil Weldon"
    <> wrote:

    >'bornfree' wrote:
    >| I am literally going nuts over this.
    >| I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when my
    >| GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    >| reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    >| (pop up box and sound would be nice)
    >_____
    >
    >You do realize that 68 C is a relatively LOW temperature for a heavily
    >loaded GPU? And that a system crash will occur if the GPU overheats enough
    >to start throwing errors? And that upon a system crash the GPU will cool
    >down?
    >
    >What graphics card(s), what operating system, what motherboard?
    >
    >nMonitor (a part of nTune by nVidia) has, among other functions, a
    >temperature level at which a warning will occur. You can select the GPUs to
    >be monitored (up to three), the alert threshold, and the type of warning
    >(audio, visual, or message.) nMonitor will also log GPU events (changes to
    >profile, temperatures, GPU usage, S.M.A.R.T status, and Bus speeds.) I
    >don't know if the graphics card monitoring functions work if you don't have
    >a motherboard by nVidia. Also functional problems have been reported with
    >64-bit Vista.
    >
    >Phil Weldon
    >
    >"bornfree" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >|I am literally going nuts over this.
    >| I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when my
    >| GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    >| reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    >| (pop up box and sound would be nice)
    >

    ASUS' PC Probe II will do that, plus more if you want.
    Bob
     
    treefrog, Dec 5, 2007
    #5
  6. bornfree

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'treefrog' wrote:
    | ASUS' PC Probe II will do that, plus more if you want.
    _____

    But ASUS Probe II only works for ASUS motherboards.

    Phil Weldon

    "treefrog" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    | On Tue, 4 Dec 2007 10:48:08 -0500, "Phil Weldon"
    | <> wrote:
    |
    | >'bornfree' wrote:
    | >| I am literally going nuts over this.
    | >| I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when my
    | >| GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    | >| reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    | >| (pop up box and sound would be nice)
    | >_____
    | >
    | >You do realize that 68 C is a relatively LOW temperature for a heavily
    | >loaded GPU? And that a system crash will occur if the GPU overheats
    enough
    | >to start throwing errors? And that upon a system crash the GPU will cool
    | >down?
    | >
    | >What graphics card(s), what operating system, what motherboard?
    | >
    | >nMonitor (a part of nTune by nVidia) has, among other functions, a
    | >temperature level at which a warning will occur. You can select the GPUs
    to
    | >be monitored (up to three), the alert threshold, and the type of warning
    | >(audio, visual, or message.) nMonitor will also log GPU events (changes
    to
    | >profile, temperatures, GPU usage, S.M.A.R.T status, and Bus speeds.) I
    | >don't know if the graphics card monitoring functions work if you don't
    have
    | >a motherboard by nVidia. Also functional problems have been reported
    with
    | >64-bit Vista.
    | >
    | >Phil Weldon
    | >
    | >"bornfree" <> wrote in message
    | >news:...
    | >|I am literally going nuts over this.
    | >| I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when my
    | >| GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    | >| reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    | >| (pop up box and sound would be nice)
    | >
    | ASUS' PC Probe II will do that, plus more if you want.
    | Bob
     
    Phil Weldon, Dec 5, 2007
    #6
  7. bornfree

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh interweb Phil Weldon typed:
    > 'treefrog' wrote:
    >> ASUS' PC Probe II will do that, plus more if you want.

    > _____
    >
    > But ASUS Probe II only works for ASUS motherboards.


    And then it's flaky. I don't trust it. It's the only util I have that gives
    the same vcore readout as CPU-Z but now and then it does silly things like
    sounds alarms for temps, vcore... whatever. It gave me a vcore warning the
    last time I used it, said my vcore had hit 3.7V! I freaked, checked CPU-Z
    and it was it's usual 1.360.

    I don't use Asus Probe II anymore.
    --
    TTFN,

    Shaun.

    > Phil Weldon
    >
    > "treefrog" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Tue, 4 Dec 2007 10:48:08 -0500, "Phil Weldon"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> 'bornfree' wrote:
    >>>> I am literally going nuts over this.
    >>>> I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when
    >>>> my GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    >>>> reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    >>>> (pop up box and sound would be nice)
    >>> _____
    >>>
    >>> You do realize that 68 C is a relatively LOW temperature for a
    >>> heavily loaded GPU? And that a system crash will occur if the GPU
    >>> overheats enough to start throwing errors? And that upon a system
    >>> crash the GPU will cool down?
    >>>
    >>> What graphics card(s), what operating system, what motherboard?
    >>>
    >>> nMonitor (a part of nTune by nVidia) has, among other functions, a
    >>> temperature level at which a warning will occur. You can select
    >>> the GPUs to be monitored (up to three), the alert threshold, and
    >>> the type of warning (audio, visual, or message.) nMonitor will
    >>> also log GPU events (changes to profile, temperatures, GPU usage,
    >>> S.M.A.R.T status, and Bus speeds.) I don't know if the graphics
    >>> card monitoring functions work if you don't have a motherboard by
    >>> nVidia. Also functional problems have been reported with 64-bit
    >>> Vista.
    >>>
    >>> Phil Weldon
    >>>
    >>> "bornfree" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> I am literally going nuts over this.
    >>>> I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when
    >>>> my GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    >>>> reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    >>>> (pop up box and sound would be nice)
    >>>

    >> ASUS' PC Probe II will do that, plus more if you want.
    >> Bob
     
    ~misfit~, Dec 5, 2007
    #7
  8. bornfree

    Phil Weldon Guest

    '~misfit~', replying to
    | > 'treefrog'

    | >> ASUS' PC Probe II will do that, plus more if you want.
    | > _____

    replying to 'Phil Weldon'

    | > But ASUS Probe II only works for ASUS motherboards.

    wrote:
    | And then it's flaky. I don't trust it. It's the only util I have that
    gives
    | the same vcore readout as CPU-Z but now and then it does silly things like
    | sounds alarms for temps, vcore... whatever. It gave me a vcore warning the
    | last time I used it, said my vcore had hit 3.7V! I freaked, checked CPU-Z
    | and it was it's usual 1.360.
    |
    | I don't use Asus Probe II anymore.
    _____

    Alien abductees thank you B^)

    I have yet to find a system health utility that is more than just barely
    useful with my EVGA 680i SL motherboard. While the Phoenix Award BIOS
    reports core voltage, +5 v, +12 v, +3.3 v, and battery voltage reliably (I
    think, so far). The BIOS also has FIVE fans listed, all with speed control
    settings, but only 3 of the fans report a speed (I have 4 fans plugged in:
    4-pin 100mm fan on ThermalTake 7i, 3-pin 50 mm fan on chipset fan, and two
    3-pin 80mm chassis fans. The BIOS reports four temperatures: CPU core,
    chipset, motherboard, and GPU.

    But while the nVidia Monitor reports speeds for 3 fans, NONE OF THE RPMs
    reported change at all when the fans are mechanically slowed or stopped!

    The 3 temperatures reported by nVidia Monitor (CPU, chipset, and GPU) seem
    to be correct, but why no motherboard temperature?

    nVidia Monitor reports no power supply voltages, but does report 7 system
    voltages. According to the 'tool tips'
    each of the 7 reported voltages 'displays and tracks the voltages for system
    components'. But this is not true; the displayed voltages are the voltages
    SELECTED in the BIOS, do not change unless the BIOS parameters are changed,
    and does NOT track the ACTUAL voltages.

    Also, nVidia Monitor reports 7 system frequencies;
    CPU core
    FSB
    Memory
    SPP PCI-E
    MPC PCI-E
    GPU core (3D)
    GPU memory.
    All well and good, but SPP PCI-E and MPC PCI-E are reported as 2500 MHz!
    (with a 1200 MHz FSB and a 1200 MHz Memory setting (1:1 CPU clock : Memory
    clock ratio) Somehow that just does not look right to me.

    On the other hand, with nTune, more than 40 system parameters can be
    individually changed on-the-fly from Windows; most can also be changed
    collectively by loading a profile from Windows. Which abilities I would
    gladly give up for trustworthy reporting, in real time; system and power
    supply voltages, all fan speed for fans connected to the motherboard with
    4-pin or 3-pin connectors; and TAT like reporting of each core temperature,
    the chipset temperature, the motherboard temperature, the GPU temperature.

    ALL of the third party system health utilities have problems that are at
    least as bad as those in nVidia Monitor (and I've tried all the usual
    suspects.

    SpeedFan does seem to be moving in the right direction, and it does
    correctly the Winbond Super IO chip W83627DGHas W but even the late November
    2007 beta does not explicitly support my motherboard; errors include a
    somewhat too low CPU core voltage, erratic fan speed control, only two fan
    speeds reported, and a +12v power supply reported as under 10 volts. While
    SpeedFan 4.33 reports NINE temperatures
    System: -65 C
    CPU: 27 C
    AUX: 35 C
    HD0: 28 C
    HD1: 26 C
    Core 0: 30 C
    Core1: 31 C
    Core: 50 C
    Ambient: 0 C

    only seven seem to be correct, and no amount of fiddling with sensor types
    can make sense of the minus -65 C system temperature and the 0 C Ambient
    temperature ( I wish! ).

    I don't have any way to check whether motherboard that are explicitly
    supported by SpeedFan eliminate some or all of the problems I see.

    I long for the days of the rock solid Motherboard Monitor. Then again,
    there were VERY few values, other than power supply values, that the
    motherboards had the capability of supplying to a system health monitor.

    I greatly fault nVidia for producing a system health monitor with so many
    problems, especially since the nVidia chipset and implementation have
    extreme performance and overclocking as the justification for the high
    prices!

    I'd be grateful for suggestions of other system health monitor utilities.

    Phil Weldon

    "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    | Somewhere on teh interweb Phil Weldon typed:
    | > 'treefrog' wrote:
    | >> ASUS' PC Probe II will do that, plus more if you want.
    | > _____
    | >
    | > But ASUS Probe II only works for ASUS motherboards.
    |
    | And then it's flaky. I don't trust it. It's the only util I have that
    gives
    | the same vcore readout as CPU-Z but now and then it does silly things like
    | sounds alarms for temps, vcore... whatever. It gave me a vcore warning the
    | last time I used it, said my vcore had hit 3.7V! I freaked, checked CPU-Z
    | and it was it's usual 1.360.
    |
    | I don't use Asus Probe II anymore.
    | --
    | TTFN,
    |
    | Shaun.
    |
    | > Phil Weldon
    | >
    | > "treefrog" <> wrote in message
    | > news:...
    | >> On Tue, 4 Dec 2007 10:48:08 -0500, "Phil Weldon"
    | >> <> wrote:
    | >>
    | >>> 'bornfree' wrote:
    | >>>> I am literally going nuts over this.
    | >>>> I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when
    | >>>> my GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    | >>>> reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    | >>>> (pop up box and sound would be nice)
    | >>> _____
    | >>>
    | >>> You do realize that 68 C is a relatively LOW temperature for a
    | >>> heavily loaded GPU? And that a system crash will occur if the GPU
    | >>> overheats enough to start throwing errors? And that upon a system
    | >>> crash the GPU will cool down?
    | >>>
    | >>> What graphics card(s), what operating system, what motherboard?
    | >>>
    | >>> nMonitor (a part of nTune by nVidia) has, among other functions, a
    | >>> temperature level at which a warning will occur. You can select
    | >>> the GPUs to be monitored (up to three), the alert threshold, and
    | >>> the type of warning (audio, visual, or message.) nMonitor will
    | >>> also log GPU events (changes to profile, temperatures, GPU usage,
    | >>> S.M.A.R.T status, and Bus speeds.) I don't know if the graphics
    | >>> card monitoring functions work if you don't have a motherboard by
    | >>> nVidia. Also functional problems have been reported with 64-bit
    | >>> Vista.
    | >>>
    | >>> Phil Weldon
    | >>>
    | >>> "bornfree" <> wrote in message
    | >>>
    news:...
    | >>>> I am literally going nuts over this.
    | >>>> I desperately need an application that will actually WARN me when
    | >>>> my GPU temp goes over 68c or something similar. So many temperature
    | >>>> reading applications out there, but none of them freaking warn me!
    | >>>> (pop up box and sound would be nice)
    | >>>
    | >> ASUS' PC Probe II will do that, plus more if you want.
    | >> Bob
    |
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Dec 5, 2007
    #8
  9. bornfree

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh interweb Phil Weldon typed:


    <mucho snipping>

    > I long for the days of the rock solid Motherboard Monitor.


    So do I! I still have it installed on this machine, (P5K-E) mainly for it's
    ability to track the temps of the 3 Seagate SATA HDDs and keep a record of
    high/low/average temps over a "session".

    (However, sadly, it won't pick up the temp sensor in an IDE HDD that I just
    connected via the on-board JMicron controller. Niether will Speedfan 4.33. I
    really dislike not knowing a temp, especially as this HDD isn't in as good
    an area of airflow as the SATA drives so I can't really extrapolate, or
    interpolate, or accurately guess, whichever is the correct term. <g>)

    > I'd be grateful for suggestions of other system health monitor
    > utilities.


    As would I Phil, as would I. I'd love to have an idea of that IDE HDD temp.
    Even a snap-shot of it so I can compare it to other temp and get some idea
    of where it stands.

    I've been particularly paranoid about HDD temps ever since my flatmate
    "cooked" a new Samsung Spinpoint by situating it in a "dead air" area of the
    case, in a 5 1/2" bay between two optical drives. No amount of tweaking will
    make that drive reliable again, including Samsung's utility (that's supposed
    to re-map bad sectors) and SpinRite 6.0. A New Zealand summer can get hot.
    Dead spots inside computer cases can get hotter still. :-(
    --
    Cheers,

    Shaun.
     
    ~misfit~, Dec 6, 2007
    #9
  10. bornfree

    Dr.White Guest

    "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    news:47573f10$...
    > Somewhere on teh interweb Phil Weldon typed:
    >
    >
    > <mucho snipping>
    >
    >> I long for the days of the rock solid Motherboard Monitor.

    >
    > So do I! I still have it installed on this machine, (P5K-E) mainly for
    > it's ability to track the temps of the 3 Seagate SATA HDDs and keep a
    > record of high/low/average temps over a "session".
    >
    > (However, sadly, it won't pick up the temp sensor in an IDE HDD that I
    > just connected via the on-board JMicron controller. Niether will Speedfan
    > 4.33. I really dislike not knowing a temp, especially as this HDD isn't in
    > as good an area of airflow as the SATA drives so I can't really
    > extrapolate, or interpolate, or accurately guess, whichever is the correct
    > term. <g>)
    >
    >> I'd be grateful for suggestions of other system health monitor
    >> utilities.

    >
    > As would I Phil, as would I. I'd love to have an idea of that IDE HDD
    > temp. Even a snap-shot of it so I can compare it to other temp and get
    > some idea of where it stands.
    >
    > I've been particularly paranoid about HDD temps ever since my flatmate
    > "cooked" a new Samsung Spinpoint by situating it in a "dead air" area of
    > the case, in a 5 1/2" bay between two optical drives. No amount of
    > tweaking will make that drive reliable again, including Samsung's utility
    > (that's supposed to re-map bad sectors) and SpinRite 6.0. A New Zealand
    > summer can get hot. Dead spots inside computer cases can get hotter still.
    > :-(
    > --
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Shaun.

    Hello mate,

    I wonder if S.M.A.R.T. is enabled for your IDE HDD via the Jmicron
    controller or your BIOS, or maybe even through a download from the HDD
    vendor's site. For instance, Hitachi offer downloads such as drive fitness
    test for their drives.

    Speedfan 4.33 is ok with my drive, it provides a temperature plus an
    in-depth analysis of the fitness, performance, graphs, all that stuff, and
    the good man Alfredo who writes Speedfan is, as I stated before, most
    helpful and doesn't mind responding to queries via email.

    Cooked a Spinpoint eh? That's worrying news. I'd be interested to know what
    temps caused that sort of problem - I think I told you about that 10,000rpm
    drive inside one of my samplers - there's no room around it except maybe 5mm
    either side, all I could do was wire a tiny fan to the PSU and blow
    re-circulated air at it. It's rated to run at 65C, all I know is it's too
    hot to keep your finger on for more than about 10 seconds.

    Inside my non-ventilated case, the hottest I can get my drive is about 47C.
    Three years of hammer this drive has taken, and S.M.A.R.T. reports 94%
    fitness / performance, some figure to do with the spin-up time is the only
    parameter that is not 100%. With a well ventilated case such as yours, I
    think it's very unlikely that heat damage would occur. There wouldn't be any
    dead spots with your positive pressure setup, would there?

    Regards,

    Dr.White.
     
    Dr.White, Dec 6, 2007
    #10
  11. bornfree

    Dr.White Guest

    "Phil Weldon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > '~misfit~', replying to
    > | > 'treefrog'
    >
    > | >> ASUS' PC Probe II will do that, plus more if you want.
    > | > _____
    >
    > replying to 'Phil Weldon'
    >
    > | > But ASUS Probe II only works for ASUS motherboards.
    >
    > wrote:
    > | And then it's flaky. I don't trust it. It's the only util I have that
    > gives
    > | the same vcore readout as CPU-Z but now and then it does silly things
    > like
    > | sounds alarms for temps, vcore... whatever. It gave me a vcore warning
    > the
    > | last time I used it, said my vcore had hit 3.7V! I freaked, checked
    > CPU-Z
    > | and it was it's usual 1.360.
    > |
    > | I don't use Asus Probe II anymore.
    > _____
    >
    > Alien abductees thank you B^)
    >
    > I have yet to find a system health utility that is more than just barely
    > useful with my EVGA 680i SL motherboard. While the Phoenix Award BIOS
    > reports core voltage, +5 v, +12 v, +3.3 v, and battery voltage reliably (I
    > think, so far). The BIOS also has FIVE fans listed, all with speed
    > control
    > settings, but only 3 of the fans report a speed (I have 4 fans plugged in:
    > 4-pin 100mm fan on ThermalTake 7i, 3-pin 50 mm fan on chipset fan, and two
    > 3-pin 80mm chassis fans. The BIOS reports four temperatures: CPU core,
    > chipset, motherboard, and GPU.
    >
    > But while the nVidia Monitor reports speeds for 3 fans, NONE OF THE RPMs
    > reported change at all when the fans are mechanically slowed or stopped!
    >
    > The 3 temperatures reported by nVidia Monitor (CPU, chipset, and GPU) seem
    > to be correct, but why no motherboard temperature?
    >
    > nVidia Monitor reports no power supply voltages, but does report 7 system
    > voltages. According to the 'tool tips'
    > each of the 7 reported voltages 'displays and tracks the voltages for
    > system
    > components'. But this is not true; the displayed voltages are the
    > voltages
    > SELECTED in the BIOS, do not change unless the BIOS parameters are
    > changed,
    > and does NOT track the ACTUAL voltages.
    >
    > Also, nVidia Monitor reports 7 system frequencies;
    > CPU core
    > FSB
    > Memory
    > SPP PCI-E
    > MPC PCI-E
    > GPU core (3D)
    > GPU memory.
    > All well and good, but SPP PCI-E and MPC PCI-E are reported as 2500 MHz!
    > (with a 1200 MHz FSB and a 1200 MHz Memory setting (1:1 CPU clock : Memory
    > clock ratio) Somehow that just does not look right to me.
    >
    > On the other hand, with nTune, more than 40 system parameters can be
    > individually changed on-the-fly from Windows; most can also be changed
    > collectively by loading a profile from Windows. Which abilities I would
    > gladly give up for trustworthy reporting, in real time; system and power
    > supply voltages, all fan speed for fans connected to the motherboard with
    > 4-pin or 3-pin connectors; and TAT like reporting of each core
    > temperature,
    > the chipset temperature, the motherboard temperature, the GPU temperature.
    >
    > ALL of the third party system health utilities have problems that are at
    > least as bad as those in nVidia Monitor (and I've tried all the usual
    > suspects.
    >
    > SpeedFan does seem to be moving in the right direction, and it does
    > correctly the Winbond Super IO chip W83627DGHas W but even the late
    > November
    > 2007 beta does not explicitly support my motherboard; errors include a
    > somewhat too low CPU core voltage, erratic fan speed control, only two fan
    > speeds reported, and a +12v power supply reported as under 10 volts.
    > While
    > SpeedFan 4.33 reports NINE temperatures
    > System: -65 C
    > CPU: 27 C
    > AUX: 35 C
    > HD0: 28 C
    > HD1: 26 C
    > Core 0: 30 C
    > Core1: 31 C
    > Core: 50 C
    > Ambient: 0 C
    >
    > only seven seem to be correct, and no amount of fiddling with sensor types
    > can make sense of the minus -65 C system temperature and the 0 C Ambient
    > temperature ( I wish! ).
    >
    > I don't have any way to check whether motherboard that are explicitly
    > supported by SpeedFan eliminate some or all of the problems I see.
    >
    > I long for the days of the rock solid Motherboard Monitor. Then again,
    > there were VERY few values, other than power supply values, that the
    > motherboards had the capability of supplying to a system health monitor.
    >
    > I greatly fault nVidia for producing a system health monitor with so many
    > problems, especially since the nVidia chipset and implementation have
    > extreme performance and overclocking as the justification for the high
    > prices!
    >
    > I'd be grateful for suggestions of other system health monitor utilities.
    >
    > Phil Weldon
    >



    Phil - If you haven't already tried, click on the 'submit report' in
    Speedfan. My obscure mobo and its hardware monitoring chip were not
    supported with version 4.33, but after sending a report the good man
    included chipset support and some serious temperature fixes in a subsequent
    beta release. That application is the one and only monitoring tool that
    works with my PC. It's not perfect in every parameter, but is indeed moving
    in the right direction. Especially good for the OP as it can be configured
    to do almost anything - from a beep to the execution of a program - in the
    event of some threshold being exceeded or value not met.

    Regards,

    Dr.White.
     
    Dr.White, Dec 6, 2007
    #11
  12. bornfree

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh interweb Dr.White typed:
    > "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    > news:47573f10$...
    >> Somewhere on teh interweb Phil Weldon typed:
    >>
    >>
    >> <mucho snipping>
    >>
    >>> I long for the days of the rock solid Motherboard Monitor.

    >>
    >> So do I! I still have it installed on this machine, (P5K-E) mainly
    >> for it's ability to track the temps of the 3 Seagate SATA HDDs and
    >> keep a record of high/low/average temps over a "session".
    >>
    >> (However, sadly, it won't pick up the temp sensor in an IDE HDD that
    >> I just connected via the on-board JMicron controller. Niether will
    >> Speedfan 4.33. I really dislike not knowing a temp, especially as this
    >> HDD
    >> isn't in as good an area of airflow as the SATA drives so I can't
    >> really extrapolate, or interpolate, or accurately guess, whichever
    >> is the correct term. <g>)
    >>
    >>> I'd be grateful for suggestions of other system health monitor
    >>> utilities.

    >>
    >> As would I Phil, as would I. I'd love to have an idea of that IDE HDD
    >> temp. Even a snap-shot of it so I can compare it to other temp and
    >> get some idea of where it stands.
    >>
    >> I've been particularly paranoid about HDD temps ever since my
    >> flatmate "cooked" a new Samsung Spinpoint by situating it in a "dead
    >> air" area of the case, in a 5 1/2" bay between two optical drives.
    >> No amount of tweaking will make that drive reliable again, including
    >> Samsung's utility (that's supposed to re-map bad sectors) and
    >> SpinRite 6.0. A New Zealand summer can get hot. Dead spots inside
    >> computer cases can get hotter still. :-(
    >> --
    >> Cheers,
    >>
    >> Shaun.

    > Hello mate,


    Hey buddy,

    > I wonder if S.M.A.R.T. is enabled for your IDE HDD via the Jmicron
    > controller or your BIOS, or maybe even through a download from the HDD
    > vendor's site. For instance, Hitachi offer downloads such as drive
    > fitness test for their drives.


    Well, I updated the JMicron RAID software and still nothing, neither
    SpeedFan or MBM found it. I decided to temporarilly install a PCI IDE/SATA
    card that I used in my old machine and that worked fine with SpeedFan and
    MBM. I hooked the HDD up to that, booted into Windows, installed the
    software, rebooted and still no luck. Which is odd IMO. As I said, using an
    nForce2 board both utilities could read the temp sensor.

    I'm thinking that the southbridge/PCI thingy isn't letting the signal
    through? Actually, buggered if I know. <shrug>

    > Speedfan 4.33 is ok with my drive, it provides a temperature plus an
    > in-depth analysis of the fitness, performance, graphs, all that
    > stuff, and the good man Alfredo who writes Speedfan is, as I stated
    > before, most helpful and doesn't mind responding to queries via email.
    >
    > Cooked a Spinpoint eh? That's worrying news. I'd be interested to
    > know what temps caused that sort of problem


    I'm not sure to be honest. Flatmate took PC away over Xmas hollidays at
    folks place, stayed in a caravan with PC. Interior of the caravan got to
    40°C+ so that would have made the case 50°C+ and the HDD probably 60°C+.
    They're not specced for that. Maybe 50° max but certainly not over 60.

    > - I think I told you
    > about that 10,000rpm drive inside one of my samplers - there's no
    > room around it except maybe 5mm either side, all I could do was wire
    > a tiny fan to the PSU and blow re-circulated air at it.


    No way to vent it to outside the "case"?

    > It's rated to
    > run at 65C, all I know is it's too hot to keep your finger on for
    > more than about 10 seconds.


    That sounds hot. Finger... 10 seconds.... maybe just over 50°? Be nice if
    you could get it down a bit.

    > Inside my non-ventilated case, the hottest I can get my drive is
    > about 47C.


    Ow! A bit hot for my liking. Although I just checked SMART data with
    SpeedFan for the 3 drives it *does* see and highest temp is 40, 40 and 44. I
    don't know when they would have got that hot, I'm really particular about
    temps as I said. It was quite a hot day today (29°), getting towards the hot
    part of the year and my HDD temps only got to 34°. I guess on the odd day we
    have that gets to the low/mid 30's the HDD temp would approach 40.

    It'd be interesting to see what SMART gives for a "new" HDD.

    > Three years of hammer this drive has taken, and S.M.A.R.T.
    > reports 94% fitness / performance, some figure to do with the spin-up
    > time is the only parameter that is not 100%.


    SMART is a bit of a secret society type-thing. Nobody seems to know for sure
    the minutia of it's implimentation. For instance, while (IME) Seagate drives
    seem to give reasonably accurate data Samsung often give gibberish (even
    before you cook them <g>) and Maxtor give odd readings. I'm yet to see a HDD
    get much higher than about 96%.

    In fact I'm just benching/OCing a new build for a mate. It's got a new 500GB
    Seagate SATA II model .11 drive. It's only been here from new. Fitness and
    performance are both 92% according to SpeedFan's SMART tab. Also, current
    temp is 27° (120mm front fan blowing directly into HDD bay). However, it's
    saying that worst temp was 51°! Perhaps they test drives before sending them
    out of the factory, I can't see any other way it would have hit 51°.

    I didn't think my HDDs had got over 40°C.

    > With a well ventilated
    > case such as yours, I think it's very unlikely that heat damage would
    > occur. There wouldn't be any dead spots with your positive pressure
    > setup, would there?


    Well, actually, there's just the one that could be dodgy. Right where the
    IDE HDD is mounted. As my case has 9 full size bays and the JMicron IDE is
    right at the bottom of the mobo I have an IDE optical drive in the bottom
    bay. Then I have two bays that were empty as the 7800GT blows it's hot air
    towards the front there. That's where I put the drive as it's close to the
    controller and the only place the ribbon reaches. Above that the 120mm fan
    is mounted blowing in over the 3 SATA drives. So the IDE drive is in an area
    between inflow and outflow, right where the graphics card (the hottest thing
    in the case) is blowing it's exhaust. That's why I'm interested to know it's
    temp. It won't be really bad, just probably hotter than the others.

    Cheers my good man,
    --
    Shaun.
     
    ~misfit~, Dec 6, 2007
    #12
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. journey
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    408
    Joan Hansen
    Apr 2, 2006
  2. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,052
  3. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    950
  4. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    790
  5. Replies:
    1
    Views:
    778
    ancientoneuk
    Jul 15, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page