Apple to kill off Mac Pro; new Mac Mini based replacement

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Alan Browne, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    I got this from a developer. He's PO'd at Apple and has told me what is
    coming this year.

    Apple will cease shipping the Mac Pro at the end of June, 2012. A new
    "Mac Pro" model will not replace it.

    The new Mac Stack will be a Mac Mini footprint modular system which will
    allow stacking of up to 14 components in a dual daisy chain of
    Thunderbolt interfaced modules to form small and powerful to mighty
    computers.

    Mac Stack processors will come in dual and quad processor configurations
    with processors ranging from quad core i7's (2.8 to 3.4 GHz) to
    octo-core i7 processors (3.0 to 4.0 GHz). In the most powerful host
    configuration, 32 cores (64 threads) will provide the ultimate Mac
    experience in a Mac Mini sized footprint. The module is 4 inches (10.2)
    cm) high.

    Memory will be blazing fast DDZX 3000 MHz with 8 GB to 128 GB installed.

    System disks will only be available in 320, 500, 640 GB and 1 TB SSD.

    2 or 4 Graphics ATI Radeon Ultra HD Stunner 9000 cores (with 1 or 2 GB
    of GDDR5Z memory per core) will provide for light speed graphics. Up to
    12 displays can be connected (dual link DVI) or 6 displays using
    Thunderbolt.

    Interfaces: 2 Thunderbolt, 5 USB 2.0, 3 USB 3, 1 Firewire 800, 2
    Firewire 400, Audio in/out, 1 Optical audio out, 1 HDMI 1.4, 2 Gigabit
    Ethernet, SDXC card slot, Bluetooth, WiFi /n.

    Stack modules:

    Disk Stack Two: Slots for 2 2.5" SATA HD or SSD drives. May be
    ordered with 1 or 2 drives with 500 GB to 1.5 TB capacity, each. Disks
    may be hot swapped. RAID 0 and 1 capable.

    Disk Stack Five: Slots for 5 2.5" SATA HD or SSD drives. May be
    ordered with 1 to 5 drives as above. Disks may be hot swapped. RAID
    0,1,2,3,4,5,6.

    Mac Stack Too Distributed Processing Module. Each Mac Stack Too can
    host up to 8 processor boards with 1 or 2 CPU's each. Communication
    from/to the host processor is GCD/OpenCL/OpenGL over thunderbolt. Any
    combination of CPU boards may be run in the system. Each processor is
    loaded with an iOS/OS X/Linux/Windows configuration designated by the
    host. (Windows may only be loaded on the intel processors).

    CPU's available:
    - Apple A6 Quad Core (2, 4 GB per processor)
    - intel i5, i7, Xeon (4, 8, 16, 32 GB per processor)
    - ATI Radeon Hyper Graphics Engine (4 GB).

    SSD: 128 or 256 GB per processor on the CPU board.

    Each CPU module will have host independent USB 2.0, USB 3, Firewire
    800, Firewire 400, Gigabit ethernet and WiFi. The Graphics engine
    will have HDMI, DVI and Thunderbolt outputs.

    Mac Stack Too may also be run independent of a local host system.

    A Mac Stack Too with 8 dual octo-core i7 processors can run 256 threads
    simultaneously under the control of the host CPU using GCD. If the host
    has four octo core i7's, then a total of 320 threads may be running on
    the system. This is ideal for video processing and is aimed squarely at
    the film making industry.
     
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  2. Ant

    Ant Guest

    April Fools? :p


    On 4/1/2012 7:50 AM PT, Alan Browne typed:

    > I got this from a developer. He's PO'd at Apple and has told me what is
    > coming this year.
    >
    > Apple will cease shipping the Mac Pro at the end of June, 2012. A new
    > "Mac Pro" model will not replace it.
    >
    > The new Mac Stack will be a Mac Mini footprint modular system which will
    > allow stacking of up to 14 components in a dual daisy chain of
    > Thunderbolt interfaced modules to form small and powerful to mighty
    > computers.
    >
    > Mac Stack processors will come in dual and quad processor configurations
    > with processors ranging from quad core i7's (2.8 to 3.4 GHz) to
    > octo-core i7 processors (3.0 to 4.0 GHz). In the most powerful host
    > configuration, 32 cores (64 threads) will provide the ultimate Mac
    > experience in a Mac Mini sized footprint. The module is 4 inches (10.2)
    > cm) high.
    >
    > Memory will be blazing fast DDZX 3000 MHz with 8 GB to 128 GB installed.
    >
    > System disks will only be available in 320, 500, 640 GB and 1 TB SSD.
    >
    > 2 or 4 Graphics ATI Radeon Ultra HD Stunner 9000 cores (with 1 or 2 GB
    > of GDDR5Z memory per core) will provide for light speed graphics. Up to
    > 12 displays can be connected (dual link DVI) or 6 displays using
    > Thunderbolt.
    >
    > Interfaces: 2 Thunderbolt, 5 USB 2.0, 3 USB 3, 1 Firewire 800, 2
    > Firewire 400, Audio in/out, 1 Optical audio out, 1 HDMI 1.4, 2 Gigabit
    > Ethernet, SDXC card slot, Bluetooth, WiFi /n.
    >
    > Stack modules:
    >
    > Disk Stack Two: Slots for 2 2.5" SATA HD or SSD drives. May be ordered
    > with 1 or 2 drives with 500 GB to 1.5 TB capacity, each. Disks may be
    > hot swapped. RAID 0 and 1 capable.
    >
    > Disk Stack Five: Slots for 5 2.5" SATA HD or SSD drives. May be ordered
    > with 1 to 5 drives as above. Disks may be hot swapped. RAID 0,1,2,3,4,5,6.
    >
    > Mac Stack Too Distributed Processing Module. Each Mac Stack Too can host
    > up to 8 processor boards with 1 or 2 CPU's each. Communication from/to
    > the host processor is GCD/OpenCL/OpenGL over thunderbolt. Any
    > combination of CPU boards may be run in the system. Each processor is
    > loaded with an iOS/OS X/Linux/Windows configuration designated by the
    > host. (Windows may only be loaded on the intel processors).
    >
    > CPU's available:
    > - Apple A6 Quad Core (2, 4 GB per processor)
    > - intel i5, i7, Xeon (4, 8, 16, 32 GB per processor)
    > - ATI Radeon Hyper Graphics Engine (4 GB).
    >
    > SSD: 128 or 256 GB per processor on the CPU board.
    >
    > Each CPU module will have host independent USB 2.0, USB 3, Firewire
    > 800, Firewire 400, Gigabit ethernet and WiFi. The Graphics engine
    > will have HDMI, DVI and Thunderbolt outputs.
    >
    > Mac Stack Too may also be run independent of a local host system.
    >
    > A Mac Stack Too with 8 dual octo-core i7 processors can run 256 threads
    > simultaneously under the control of the host CPU using GCD. If the host
    > has four octo core i7's, then a total of 320 threads may be running on
    > the system. This is ideal for video processing and is aimed squarely at
    > the film making industry.

    --
    "Look at them, fighting like ants. The fate's waiting them." --Kane in
    Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars
    /\___/\ Ant(Dude) @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
    / /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
    | |o o| |
    \ _ / If crediting, then use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link.
    ( ) If e-mailing, then axe ANT from its address if needed.
    Ant is currently not listening to any songs on this computer.
     
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  3. George Kerby

    George Kerby Guest

    Yeah. Browne has way too much time on his paws...


    On 4/1/12 10:00 AM, in article
    , "Ant" <>
    wrote:

    > April Fools? :p
    >
    >
    > On 4/1/2012 7:50 AM PT, Alan Browne typed:
    >
    >> I got this from a developer. He's PO'd at Apple and has told me what is
    >> coming this year.
    >>
    >> Apple will cease shipping the Mac Pro at the end of June, 2012. A new
    >> "Mac Pro" model will not replace it.
    >>
    >> The new Mac Stack will be a Mac Mini footprint modular system which will
    >> allow stacking of up to 14 components in a dual daisy chain of
    >> Thunderbolt interfaced modules to form small and powerful to mighty
    >> computers.
    >>
    >> Mac Stack processors will come in dual and quad processor configurations
    >> with processors ranging from quad core i7's (2.8 to 3.4 GHz) to
    >> octo-core i7 processors (3.0 to 4.0 GHz). In the most powerful host
    >> configuration, 32 cores (64 threads) will provide the ultimate Mac
    >> experience in a Mac Mini sized footprint. The module is 4 inches (10.2)
    >> cm) high.
    >>
    >> Memory will be blazing fast DDZX 3000 MHz with 8 GB to 128 GB installed.
    >>
    >> System disks will only be available in 320, 500, 640 GB and 1 TB SSD.
    >>
    >> 2 or 4 Graphics ATI Radeon Ultra HD Stunner 9000 cores (with 1 or 2 GB
    >> of GDDR5Z memory per core) will provide for light speed graphics. Up to
    >> 12 displays can be connected (dual link DVI) or 6 displays using
    >> Thunderbolt.
    >>
    >> Interfaces: 2 Thunderbolt, 5 USB 2.0, 3 USB 3, 1 Firewire 800, 2
    >> Firewire 400, Audio in/out, 1 Optical audio out, 1 HDMI 1.4, 2 Gigabit
    >> Ethernet, SDXC card slot, Bluetooth, WiFi /n.
    >>
    >> Stack modules:
    >>
    >> Disk Stack Two: Slots for 2 2.5" SATA HD or SSD drives. May be ordered
    >> with 1 or 2 drives with 500 GB to 1.5 TB capacity, each. Disks may be
    >> hot swapped. RAID 0 and 1 capable.
    >>
    >> Disk Stack Five: Slots for 5 2.5" SATA HD or SSD drives. May be ordered
    >> with 1 to 5 drives as above. Disks may be hot swapped. RAID 0,1,2,3,4,5,6.
    >>
    >> Mac Stack Too Distributed Processing Module. Each Mac Stack Too can host
    >> up to 8 processor boards with 1 or 2 CPU's each. Communication from/to
    >> the host processor is GCD/OpenCL/OpenGL over thunderbolt. Any
    >> combination of CPU boards may be run in the system. Each processor is
    >> loaded with an iOS/OS X/Linux/Windows configuration designated by the
    >> host. (Windows may only be loaded on the intel processors).
    >>
    >> CPU's available:
    >> - Apple A6 Quad Core (2, 4 GB per processor)
    >> - intel i5, i7, Xeon (4, 8, 16, 32 GB per processor)
    >> - ATI Radeon Hyper Graphics Engine (4 GB).
    >>
    >> SSD: 128 or 256 GB per processor on the CPU board.
    >>
    >> Each CPU module will have host independent USB 2.0, USB 3, Firewire
    >> 800, Firewire 400, Gigabit ethernet and WiFi. The Graphics engine
    >> will have HDMI, DVI and Thunderbolt outputs.
    >>
    >> Mac Stack Too may also be run independent of a local host system.
    >>
    >> A Mac Stack Too with 8 dual octo-core i7 processors can run 256 threads
    >> simultaneously under the control of the host CPU using GCD. If the host
    >> has four octo core i7's, then a total of 320 threads may be running on
    >> the system. This is ideal for video processing and is aimed squarely at
    >> the film making industry.
     
  4. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2012-04-01 11:10 , China Blue Water Navy wrote:
    >> The new Mac Stack will be a Mac Mini footprint modular system which will
    >> allow stacking of up to 14 components in a dual daisy chain of
    >> Thunderbolt interfaced modules to form small and powerful to mighty
    >> computers.

    >
    > A few decades Brooks warned of the Attack of the Killer Micros: a network of
    > smaller processors could exceed the performance for less cost of one big
    > computer. (Although in the years since 'big' has become smaller.)


    Pretty much all of today's fastest computers are massively parallel
    microprocessor based. The current #1 "K" has 88,128 octo-core SPARC64
    processors. That's 705,024 cores running. Might even balance your
    chequebook.

    The lowly Atom is being used in some servers farms with dozens of Atoms
    per processor board. (One server, for example, has 512 cores in the unit).

    --
    "I was gratified to be able to answer promptly, and I did.
    I said I didn't know."
    -Samuel Clemens.
     
  5. Ant

    Ant Guest

    On 4/1/2012 8:09 AM PT, George Kerby typed:

    > Yeah. Browne has way too much time on his paws...


    Paws? He's not a human? ;)
    --
    "When the people look like ants -- PULL. When the ants look like people
    -- PRAY." --A skydiving quote
    /\___/\ Ant(Dude) @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
    / /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
    | |o o| |
    \ _ / If crediting, then use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link.
    ( ) If e-mailing, then axe ANT from its address if needed.
    Ant is currently not listening to any songs on this computer.
     
  6. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest

    Alan Browne wrote:

    > Apple will cease shipping the Mac Pro at the end of June, 2012. A new
    > "Mac Pro" model will not replace it.


    Because this is a credible rumour, Apple would not make an April Fools
    joke about this.

    I shoudl note that I was blasted left and right when I suggested not
    long ago that there were rumours Apple was quitting the MacPro.
     
  7. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2012-04-01 15:13 , JF Mezei wrote:
    > Alan Browne wrote:
    >
    >> Apple will cease shipping the Mac Pro at the end of June, 2012. A new
    >> "Mac Pro" model will not replace it.

    >
    > Because this is a credible rumour, Apple would not make an April Fools
    > joke about this.


    Who said it was Apple making an April Fools joke with this?

    >
    > I shoudl note that I was blasted left and right when I suggested not
    > long ago that there were rumours Apple was quitting the MacPro.


    I think the Mac Pro platform is an anachronistic attachment to tower
    form computers. If the the "Mac Pro" survives as a tower, it should at
    least lose some bulk and weight.

    If it comes out as a "cube" with the same footprint as the Mac Mini I
    wouldn't be surprised...


    --
    "I was gratified to be able to answer promptly, and I did.
    I said I didn't know."
    -Samuel Clemens.
     
  8. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest

    Alan Browne wrote:

    > If it comes out as a "cube" with the same footprint as the Mac Mini I
    > wouldn't be surprised...



    The whole point is to be able to insert full sized PCI express cards in
    it as well as having 4 disks.

    Can't fit that in a cube. And cubes have terrible ventilation, not not
    suited to long periods of heavy CPU usage (such as when rendering a
    movie or using handbrake)
     
  9. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2012-04-01 15:22 , JF Mezei wrote:
    > Alan Browne wrote:
    >
    >> If it comes out as a "cube" with the same footprint as the Mac Mini I
    >> wouldn't be surprised...

    >
    >
    > The whole point is to be able to insert full sized PCI express cards in
    > it as well as having 4 disks.


    Nothing says Mac Pros must take PCI express cards. I/O is going fully
    serial (or WiFi or BlueTooth). Thunderbolt is the new fast lane for
    disks, video and other applications.

    > Can't fit that in a cube. And cubes have terrible ventilation, not not
    > suited to long periods of heavy CPU usage (such as when rendering a
    > movie or using handbrake)


    There are many ways to manage heat removal.

    But the real point is that the tower form is dead and the next Mac Pro
    may reflect that.

    --
    "I was gratified to be able to answer promptly, and I did.
    I said I didn't know."
    -Samuel Clemens.
     
  10. In article <>, Jolly
    Roger <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Alan Browne <> wrote:
    >
    > > On 2012-04-01 15:22 , JF Mezei wrote:
    > > > Alan Browne wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> If it comes out as a "cube" with the same footprint as the Mac Mini I
    > > >> wouldn't be surprised...
    > > >
    > > > The whole point is to be able to insert full sized PCI express cards in
    > > > it as well as having 4 disks.

    > >
    > > Nothing says Mac Pros must take PCI express cards. I/O is going fully
    > > serial (or WiFi or BlueTooth). Thunderbolt is the new fast lane for
    > > disks, video and other applications.
    > >
    > > > Can't fit that in a cube. And cubes have terrible ventilation, not not
    > > > suited to long periods of heavy CPU usage (such as when rendering a
    > > > movie or using handbrake)

    > >
    > > There are many ways to manage heat removal.
    > >
    > > But the real point is that the tower form is dead and the next Mac Pro
    > > may reflect that.

    >
    > I really don't care about the form factor.
    > I simply want a very powerful workstation that allows me to:
    >
    > * throw in a faster video card if needed
    > * add tons of RAM
    > * increase HD/SSD space by adding additional internal drives
    > * possibly upgrade the CPUs


    It's called a Mac Pro. ;o)

    Helpful Harry :eek:)
     
  11. Jolly Roger <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Alan Browne <> wrote:
    >
    > > On 2012-04-01 15:22 , JF Mezei wrote:
    > > > Alan Browne wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> If it comes out as a "cube" with the same footprint as the Mac Mini I
    > > >> wouldn't be surprised...
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > The whole point is to be able to insert full sized PCI express cards in
    > > > it as well as having 4 disks.

    > >
    > > Nothing says Mac Pros must take PCI express cards. I/O is going fully
    > > serial (or WiFi or BlueTooth). Thunderbolt is the new fast lane for
    > > disks, video and other applications.
    > >
    > > > Can't fit that in a cube. And cubes have terrible ventilation, not not
    > > > suited to long periods of heavy CPU usage (such as when rendering a
    > > > movie or using handbrake)

    > >
    > > There are many ways to manage heat removal.
    > >
    > > But the real point is that the tower form is dead and the next Mac Pro
    > > may reflect that.

    >
    > I really don't care about the form factor.
    > I simply want a very powerful workstation that allows me to:
    >
    > * throw in a faster video card if needed
    > * add tons of RAM
    > * increase HD/SSD space by adding additional internal drives
    > * possibly upgrade the CPUs


    Myself I like the Mac Pro form factor and capability. It's always been
    my dream machine - slightly out of reach (or more true to say the modern
    iMacs cover enough bases that I can't quite justify a Pro for my needs).
    I'd say being CPU upgradable is important - you spend that much on a
    tower, it better be able to be upgraded at least once in processing
    power in it's lifetime.
    --
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.
     
  12. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2012-04-03 11:13 , Jolly Roger wrote:
    > In article<>,
    > Alan Browne<> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2012-04-01 15:22 , JF Mezei wrote:
    >>> Alan Browne wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> If it comes out as a "cube" with the same footprint as the Mac Mini I
    >>>> wouldn't be surprised...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> The whole point is to be able to insert full sized PCI express cards in
    >>> it as well as having 4 disks.

    >>
    >> Nothing says Mac Pros must take PCI express cards. I/O is going fully
    >> serial (or WiFi or BlueTooth). Thunderbolt is the new fast lane for
    >> disks, video and other applications.
    >>
    >>> Can't fit that in a cube. And cubes have terrible ventilation, not not
    >>> suited to long periods of heavy CPU usage (such as when rendering a
    >>> movie or using handbrake)

    >>
    >> There are many ways to manage heat removal.
    >>
    >> But the real point is that the tower form is dead and the next Mac Pro
    >> may reflect that.

    >
    > I really don't care about the form factor.
    > I simply want a very powerful workstation that allows me to:
    >
    > * throw in a faster video card if needed
    > * add tons of RAM
    > * increase HD/SSD space by adding additional internal drives
    > * possibly upgrade the CPUs


    Agree. The "April 1" system I put up there allowed for all manner of
    specialized processing, expansion and all out bit burning.

    --
    "I was gratified to be able to answer promptly, and I did.
    I said I didn't know."
    -Samuel Clemens.
     
  13. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest

    What disapointed me is that the 2009 MacPro can't be upgraded with the
    more recent faster processor because the motherboard is apparently
    incompatible.

    So they went through the effort of making a box that is very easy to
    swap cpmponents (except power supply) and go out of their way to put the
    CPU on a daughtercard (a big one at that) but don't bother providing
    upgrades.
     
  14. In article <>, Jolly
    Roger <> wrote:
    > In article
    > <>,
    > (Helpful Harry) wrote:
    > > In article <>, Jolly
    > > Roger <> wrote:
    > > > In article <>,
    > > > Alan Browne <> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > On 2012-04-01 15:22 , JF Mezei wrote:
    > > > > > Alan Browne wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > >> If it comes out as a "cube" with the same footprint as the Mac Mini I
    > > > > >> wouldn't be surprised...
    > > > > >
    > > > > > The whole point is to be able to insert full sized PCI express

    cards in
    > > > > > it as well as having 4 disks.
    > > > >
    > > > > Nothing says Mac Pros must take PCI express cards. I/O is going fully
    > > > > serial (or WiFi or BlueTooth). Thunderbolt is the new fast lane for
    > > > > disks, video and other applications.
    > > > >
    > > > > > Can't fit that in a cube. And cubes have terrible ventilation, not not
    > > > > > suited to long periods of heavy CPU usage (such as when rendering a
    > > > > > movie or using handbrake)
    > > > >
    > > > > There are many ways to manage heat removal.
    > > > >
    > > > > But the real point is that the tower form is dead and the next Mac Pro
    > > > > may reflect that.
    > > >
    > > > I really don't care about the form factor.
    > > > I simply want a very powerful workstation that allows me to:
    > > >
    > > > * throw in a faster video card if needed
    > > > * add tons of RAM
    > > > * increase HD/SSD space by adding additional internal drives
    > > > * possibly upgrade the CPUs

    > >
    > > It's called a Mac Pro. ;o)

    >
    > Apparently you haven't bothered to read this thread at all. Try again.


    Apparently you don't understand that a ;o) smiley indicates a joke.

    Helpful Harry :eek:)
     
  15. Dan Becker

    Dan Becker Guest

    In article <>,
    Jolly Roger <> wrote:

    > I'm still very satisfied with the speed of my 2008 Mac Pro, three years
    > later. And the relatively minor speed increase offered by a CPU upgrade
    > isn't worth the expense to me at the moment. That might change in
    > another couple years; but by then I may be ready for a new machine
    > altogether. I'd say CPU upgradability is important, but not a very big
    > consideration to me in comparison with video card, RAM, SSD, and so on -
    > especially given the relative increase in computing power offered by the
    > current Mac Pro compared with the rest of Apple's models.


    I keep my machines a long time; not a serial gotta-have-the-latest
    upgrader. I always felt that the CPU upgrades were limited by the bus
    speeds of the base machine when they finally started becoming annoying,
    and so I've never gone down that path. But my replacement cycle has
    been on the order of 6-7 years, so I guess you could say I'm a pretty
    patient guy.

    Dan
     
  16. Dan Becker <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Jolly Roger <> wrote:
    >
    > > I'm still very satisfied with the speed of my 2008 Mac Pro, three years
    > > later. And the relatively minor speed increase offered by a CPU upgrade
    > > isn't worth the expense to me at the moment. That might change in
    > > another couple years; but by then I may be ready for a new machine
    > > altogether. I'd say CPU upgradability is important, but not a very big
    > > consideration to me in comparison with video card, RAM, SSD, and so on -
    > > especially given the relative increase in computing power offered by the
    > > current Mac Pro compared with the rest of Apple's models.

    >
    > I keep my machines a long time; not a serial gotta-have-the-latest
    > upgrader. I always felt that the CPU upgrades were limited by the bus
    > speeds of the base machine when they finally started becoming annoying,
    > and so I've never gone down that path. But my replacement cycle has
    > been on the order of 6-7 years, so I guess you could say I'm a pretty
    > patient guy.
    >
    > Dan


    I usually seem to make Macs last at least five years myself. But there's
    no doubt a CPU upgrade once the chip type is cheap and the machine a few
    years old would extend lifespan. Assuming one isn't hobbled by a machine
    with a very low RAM ceiling, for example.

    Anyway, a CPU upgrade is the last thing I ever consider upgrading. First
    is always RAM, more HD space, GPU, and a faster internal HD to boot and
    run apps from. Possibly monitor too if a modular system. Still, for a
    Mac Pro it would be nice to be able to squeeze another couple years out
    of it with a modest and cheap CPU upgrade. Not so much for an iMac.
    --
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.
     
  17. Jolly Roger <> wrote:

    > In article <030420122247570815%>,
    > Dan Becker <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>,
    > > Jolly Roger <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I'm still very satisfied with the speed of my 2008 Mac Pro, three years
    > > > later. And the relatively minor speed increase offered by a CPU upgrade
    > > > isn't worth the expense to me at the moment. That might change in
    > > > another couple years; but by then I may be ready for a new machine
    > > > altogether. I'd say CPU upgradability is important, but not a very big
    > > > consideration to me in comparison with video card, RAM, SSD, and so on -
    > > > especially given the relative increase in computing power offered by the
    > > > current Mac Pro compared with the rest of Apple's models.

    > >
    > > I keep my machines a long time; not a serial gotta-have-the-latest
    > > upgrader. I always felt that the CPU upgrades were limited by the bus
    > > speeds of the base machine when they finally started becoming annoying,
    > > and so I've never gone down that path. But my replacement cycle has
    > > been on the order of 6-7 years, so I guess you could say I'm a pretty
    > > patient guy.
    > >
    > > Dan

    >
    > Yep. I've upgraded a couple early single-core and early dual-core Intel
    > Mac minis with significant performance increases and relatively small
    > expense. But they are the exception.


    IME there's a very fine line between the value of most CPU upgrades for
    Macs and just buying a new Mac. That said there have been times when
    older, yet still faster chips are cheap enough to make it worthwhile. I
    upgraded the CPU of my.. I think it was a PM7300? a couple times very
    cheaply.

    OTOH the CPU upgrade for my Lime Rev c iMac using the Sonnet Harmoni
    board (added faster CPU and firewire 400) was _not_ worthwhile in
    monetary terms. It was for fun - I still think the old CRT iMacs look
    very retro cool with their colours and refrigerator-style pinstripe
    plastic. I wish I still had one functioning.
    --
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.
     
  18. Helpful Harry <> wrote:

    > In article <>, Jolly
    > Roger <> wrote:
    > > In article
    > > <>,
    > > (Helpful Harry) wrote:

    [snip]
    > > > It's called a Mac Pro. ;o)

    > >
    > > Apparently you haven't bothered to read this thread at all. Try again.

    >
    > Apparently you don't understand that a ;o) smiley indicates a joke.
    >
    > Helpful Harry :eek:)


    Looks like a pig to me.
    --
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.
     
  19. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest

    Jamie Kahn Genet wrote:

    > I usually seem to make Macs last at least five years myself.



    5 years from now, when you feel the need to upgrade, I sense that the
    Apple product lineup may be extremely different.

    When you look at the power draw for grtaphics cards, and the need to
    have multiple cards to drive 2 displays AND a TV, this is possible on
    the Mac Pro, but I suspect Apple will have you go with iMac and an
    AppleTV instead. Problem is that VLC doesn't run on AppleTV.
     
  20. In article <>, Jolly
    Roger <> wrote:
    > In article
    > <>,
    > (Helpful Harry) wrote:
    > > In article <>, Jolly
    > > Roger <> wrote:
    > > > In article
    > > > <>,
    > > > (Helpful Harry) wrote:
    > > > > In article <>, Jolly
    > > > > Roger <> wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > I really don't care about the form factor.
    > > > > > I simply want a very powerful workstation that allows me to:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > * throw in a faster video card if needed
    > > > > > * add tons of RAM
    > > > > > * increase HD/SSD space by adding additional internal drives
    > > > > > * possibly upgrade the CPUs
    > > > >
    > > > > It's called a Mac Pro. ;o)
    > > >
    > > > Apparently you haven't bothered to read this thread at all. Try again.

    > >
    > > Apparently you don't understand that a ;o) smiley indicates a joke.
    > >

    > I'm sorry, but that's an extremely corny joke. ; )


    Corny?!? Nah, it was very Appley though. ;o)

    Helpful Harry :eek:)
     
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