Asrock P4V88+ & Celeron D 320 (2.4GHz) overclock question

Discussion in 'ASRock' started by __spc__, Nov 2, 2005.

  1. __spc__

    __spc__ Guest

    Hi,

    I thought I'd try and eek out some extra speed of my Celeron D, as I'd read
    several reports of successful overclocking.

    My set up is an Asrock P4V88+
    (http://www.asrock.com/product/product_p4v88 .htm), Celeron D 320 (2.4GHz;
    http://www.intel.com/products/processor/celeron_D/index.htm), generic 512MB
    DDR(400), NVidia GeForce4 MX 400 with 64MB, one case fan in and two out case
    fans; at idle, this CPU is ca. 50 deg C.

    The mobo has some overclock technology in it (auto recover from bad config
    etc.), and it locks the PCI/AGP clock ratios in at 66 & 33 MHz, while
    allowing FSB changes; the multiplier seems locked at 18.

    I thought I'd try an FSB change from 133 to 166 to get 3GHz, but the system
    wouldn't boot at all, just a flashing DVD drive light and power light, no
    BIOS POST check or anything.

    Am I taking the too smple approach here by just trying to change the FSB?

    Any pointers much appreciated...
     
    __spc__, Nov 2, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. __spc__

    Phil Weldon Guest

    '__spc__' wrote, in part:
    | I thought I'd try and eek out some extra speed of my Celeron D, as I'd
    read
    | several reports of successful overclocking.
    _____

    I've posted this general overclocking guide to this newsgroups several times
    in the past few months. You should find what you need, or at least the
    basis to ask further questions.
    *****
    A whole lot of people who have no idea of how to overclock have been
    successful in overclocking. If the motherboard is 'overclocking friendly',
    an Intel CPU is very easy to overclock. If the motherboard is NOT
    'overclocking friendly' the task is much more difficult. If your
    motherboard is 'overclocking friendly' the manual likely gives all the
    information necessary to overclock, though the manual may have been
    translanted back and forth among several languanges, and the information may
    be a bit confusing.

    #1. Raising the CPU voltage can destroy your CPU. NEVER raise the CPU
    voltage more than 15% above the default voltage specified by Intel.
    If you do raise it, do it in very small steps.

    #2. Raising the CPU clock speed will NOT damage your Intel CPU,
    motherboard, memory, or anything else. If you raise the clock speed too
    much, the system will either not run in a stable manner, or will fail to
    boot. This is not a problem because either the BIOS will automatically
    reset to default values or there will be directions in the manual on how to
    reset to default speeds.

    #3. In overclocking, make any changes in small steps, checking for proper
    operation after each change.

    #4. Overclocking works best when the CPU temperature is kept as low as
    possible.

    #5. Intel CPUs can ONLY be overclocked by raising the clock speed. Even if
    the multiplier can be set in the BIOS, changing this settings has NO effect.

    #6. Some older motherboards may report an incorrect speed for CPUs that
    have a higher speed than available when the BIOS was installed.

    #7. Intel CPUs have a quad-pumped memory bus; that means data is transfered
    four times for each clock cycle; for a 533 MHz Frontside Bus speed the clock
    speed is 133 MHz. That 133 MHz clock speed is multiplied by a factor FIXED
    and UNCHANGABLE inside the CPU to give the overall CPU clock speed. For
    your 2660 MHz CPU, the multiplier is X 20 (133 MHz X 20 = 2660 MHZ.)

    #8. The rated speed of the installed memory can limit the overclock.
    Memory can be overclocked, but it will eventualy reach a limit. Faster
    memory can be installed, but the cost may not be worth it. The memory clock
    can be set to a lower ratio (with some motherboards) to allow higher clock
    speeds, but there is a performance penalty.

    A reasonable goal for your CPU is 3.33 GHz. With luck and good cooling over
    3.5 GHz should be possible.

    How you overclock depends on the specifics of your system, how much patience
    you have, and much attention you pay to details.

    A general approach:

    * Download and install MotherBoard Monitor 5 (free) at
    http://mbm.livewiredev.com/ . This will allow you to monitor and
    record the CPU speeds, fan speeds, CPU temperature (and perhaps motherboard,
    memory, and other temperatures), and voltages. The power supply voltages
    reported by MotherBoard Monitor 5 should meet the specifications of ATX12V
    that can be found at
    http://www.formfactors.org/developer/specs/ATX12V_PSDG_2_2_public_br2.pdf

    * Download and install SiSoft Sandra (free) at
    http://www.sisoftware.net/ . This program is a collection of
    information gathering applets for your system. It also has low level tests
    of performance, as well as stress tests (necessary to establish proper
    operation when the CPU is operating at full capacity. I find version 2004
    more useful than 2005, but 2004 is hard to find now.

    * Use MotherBoard Monitor 4 and SiSoft Sandra because the vast majority of
    the people who use this forum also use these applications

    * Read the manual carefully.

    * Clean the heatsink fins, and fans of all dust, grease, and dirt.

    * Write down the settings in the BIOS.

    * Write down the temperature and voltage information from MotherBoard
    Monitor 5.

    * Check the voltages reported by MotherBoard Monitor 5 for you system. If
    any are outside the specifications this may affect the operation of your
    system, especially if it is overclocked. Also check the total rated output
    of your power supply, if it is marginal, overclocking (since more power is
    required) may also be marginal.

    * Steps for overclocking your Intel CPU (only after completing the above
    recommendations):

    #0. The standard setup for PCI bus and AGP bus speeds are fractions of
    the clock speed. Make sure the PCI/AGP Bus speeds are instead locked at 33
    MHz/66 MHz; if the PCI bus speed is more than 36 MHz corruption of data on
    your hard drives can occur.

    #1. Increase the clock speed by 5%.

    #2. Reboot and check for proper operation.

    #3. If #2 is successful, repeat #1.

    #4. If #2 is not successful, raise the CPU core voltage by 0.05 volts
    (in NO case raise this voltage to more than a total of 15%, doing so may
    instantly destroy your CPU; when the core voltage reaches this limit go to
    #6.)

    #5. Go to #2.

    #6. You have reached the limit of overclocking without changing other
    factors which may include CPU cooling, System cooling, memory settings.
    Installing memory capable of higher clock speeds may help. On the other
    hand, some of these changes may be expensive, and not worth the money for
    the possible performance increase.


    * After reaching the highest speed, check operation under full CPU load (use
    SiSoft Sandra burn-in, other burn-in programs, or intense action 3D
    accelerated first-person shooter games.) If the system is not stable under
    heavy load, try reducing the clock speed and/or CPU core voltage (higher
    voltage means higher operating temperatures.)

    * Check the installation of the CPU heatsink; new heatsink compound may help
    CPU cooling. Find directions for using heatsink compound on the internet.

    * A better than stock heatsink/fan may aid overclocking.

    * Improved system cooling may aid overclocking.

    * Exotic cooling of the CPU to room temperature or below can significantly
    increase top speeds (or not, depending on the individual CPU speed, memory
    quality, and motherboard.)

    WARNINGS!!!
    * Increasing the CPU voltage above 15% over specifications is likely to
    INSTANTLY destroy the CPU
    * There is always a chance that when you start fooling around inside the
    system case of your computer that you may cause damage (the butterfinger
    factor.)

    You can find a LOT of additional information on the Internet, including the
    speeds that others overclockers have reached with your model CPU. One
    question you must ask yourself is WHY you wish to overclock; I can think of
    three reasons:

    #1. Higher performance at little or no expense with your present
    system.

    #2. Just because you can, and enjoy experimenting

    #3. Bragging rights - the highest possible speeds (which is going to
    require a LOT more money.

    Don't let this long list intimidate you; just go along step by step.

    I am posting this on a system using
    aBit TH7-II (Intel 850 chipset) motherboard
    Pentium 4 2.6 GHz 400 MHz FSB Northwood CPU
    PC800 RDRAM 640 MBytes
    Stock CPU cooling
    450 Watt Antec Power Supply
    With a room ambient temperature of ~ 26 C

    idle temperatures
    CPU 40 C
    motherboard 34 C
    memory 31 C

    heavy load temperatures
    CPU 51 C
    motherboard 38 C
    memory 33 C

    I selected a clock speed in the BIOS of 121 MHz, giving a CPU speed of 121
    MHz X 26 = 3146 MHz. The CPU will overclock to a higher speed, but the
    memory will not. To reach a higher CPU speed requires setting the memory
    clock/CPU clock ratio to other than 1, which reduces performance. Since I
    just want improved AND reliable performance and not the highest possible
    clock speed, 3146 suits me fine, though with async setting 3.5 GHz is easily
    reached.

    Good luck.

    Phil Weldon

    "__spc__" <> wrote in message
    news:qhW9f.12815$...
    | Hi,
    |
    | I thought I'd try and eek out some extra speed of my Celeron D, as I'd
    read
    | several reports of successful overclocking.
    |
    | My set up is an Asrock P4V88+
    | (http://www.asrock.com/product/product_p4v88 .htm), Celeron D 320 (2.4GHz;
    | http://www.intel.com/products/processor/celeron_D/index.htm), generic
    512MB
    | DDR(400), NVidia GeForce4 MX 400 with 64MB, one case fan in and two out
    case
    | fans; at idle, this CPU is ca. 50 deg C.
    |
    | The mobo has some overclock technology in it (auto recover from bad config
    | etc.), and it locks the PCI/AGP clock ratios in at 66 & 33 MHz, while
    | allowing FSB changes; the multiplier seems locked at 18.
    |
    | I thought I'd try an FSB change from 133 to 166 to get 3GHz, but the
    system
    | wouldn't boot at all, just a flashing DVD drive light and power light, no
    | BIOS POST check or anything.
    |
    | Am I taking the too smple approach here by just trying to change the FSB?
    |
    | Any pointers much appreciated...
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Nov 2, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. __spc__

    __spc__ Guest

    "Phil Weldon" <> wrote in message
    news:jXW9f.3193$...
    > '__spc__' wrote, in part:
    > | I thought I'd try and eek out some extra speed of my Celeron D, as I'd
    > read
    > | several reports of successful overclocking.
    > _____
    >
    > I've posted this general overclocking guide to this newsgroups several
    > times
    > in the past few months. You should find what you need, or at least the
    > basis to ask further questions.
    > *****

    [snip]

    Mnay thanks Phil, this looks pretty comprehensive and at first glance, just
    what I need. I'll try this out tonight.

    Thanks - __spc__
     
    __spc__, Nov 2, 2005
    #3
  4. __spc__

    __spc__ Guest

    "Phil Weldon" <> wrote in message
    news:jXW9f.3193$...
    > '__spc__' wrote, in part:
    > | I thought I'd try and eek out some extra speed of my Celeron D, as I'd
    > read
    > | several reports of successful overclocking.
    > _____
    >
    > I've posted this general overclocking guide to this newsgroups several
    > times
    > in the past few months. You should find what you need, or at least the
    > basis to ask further questions.
    > *****
    > A whole lot of people who have no idea of how to overclock have been
    > successful in overclocking. If the motherboard is 'overclocking
    > friendly',
    > an Intel CPU is very easy to overclock. If the motherboard is NOT
    > 'overclocking friendly' the task is much more difficult. If your
    > motherboard is 'overclocking friendly' the manual likely gives all the
    > information necessary to overclock, though the manual may have been
    > translanted back and forth among several languanges, and the information
    > may
    > be a bit confusing.
    >
    > #1. Raising the CPU voltage can destroy your CPU. NEVER raise the CPU
    > voltage more than 15% above the default voltage specified by Intel.
    > If you do raise it, do it in very small steps.
    >
    > #2. Raising the CPU clock speed will NOT damage your Intel CPU,
    > motherboard, memory, or anything else. If you raise the clock speed too
    > much, the system will either not run in a stable manner, or will fail to
    > boot. This is not a problem because either the BIOS will automatically
    > reset to default values or there will be directions in the manual on how
    > to
    > reset to default speeds.
    >
    > #3. In overclocking, make any changes in small steps, checking for proper
    > operation after each change.
    >
    > #4. Overclocking works best when the CPU temperature is kept as low as
    > possible.
    >
    > #5. Intel CPUs can ONLY be overclocked by raising the clock speed. Even
    > if
    > the multiplier can be set in the BIOS, changing this settings has NO
    > effect.
    >
    > #6. Some older motherboards may report an incorrect speed for CPUs that
    > have a higher speed than available when the BIOS was installed.
    >
    > #7. Intel CPUs have a quad-pumped memory bus; that means data is
    > transfered
    > four times for each clock cycle; for a 533 MHz Frontside Bus speed the
    > clock
    > speed is 133 MHz. That 133 MHz clock speed is multiplied by a factor
    > FIXED
    > and UNCHANGABLE inside the CPU to give the overall CPU clock speed. For
    > your 2660 MHz CPU, the multiplier is X 20 (133 MHz X 20 = 2660 MHZ.)
    >
    > #8. The rated speed of the installed memory can limit the overclock.
    > Memory can be overclocked, but it will eventualy reach a limit. Faster
    > memory can be installed, but the cost may not be worth it. The memory
    > clock
    > can be set to a lower ratio (with some motherboards) to allow higher clock
    > speeds, but there is a performance penalty.
    >
    > A reasonable goal for your CPU is 3.33 GHz. With luck and good cooling
    > over
    > 3.5 GHz should be possible.
    >
    > How you overclock depends on the specifics of your system, how much
    > patience
    > you have, and much attention you pay to details.
    >
    > A general approach:
    >
    > * Download and install MotherBoard Monitor 5 (free) at
    > http://mbm.livewiredev.com/ . This will allow you to monitor and
    > record the CPU speeds, fan speeds, CPU temperature (and perhaps
    > motherboard,
    > memory, and other temperatures), and voltages. The power supply voltages
    > reported by MotherBoard Monitor 5 should meet the specifications of ATX12V
    > that can be found at
    > http://www.formfactors.org/developer/specs/ATX12V_PSDG_2_2_public_br2.pdf
    >
    > * Download and install SiSoft Sandra (free) at
    > http://www.sisoftware.net/ . This program is a collection of
    > information gathering applets for your system. It also has low level
    > tests
    > of performance, as well as stress tests (necessary to establish proper
    > operation when the CPU is operating at full capacity. I find version 2004
    > more useful than 2005, but 2004 is hard to find now.
    >
    > * Use MotherBoard Monitor 4 and SiSoft Sandra because the vast majority of
    > the people who use this forum also use these applications
    >
    > * Read the manual carefully.
    >
    > * Clean the heatsink fins, and fans of all dust, grease, and dirt.
    >
    > * Write down the settings in the BIOS.
    >
    > * Write down the temperature and voltage information from MotherBoard
    > Monitor 5.
    >
    > * Check the voltages reported by MotherBoard Monitor 5 for you system. If
    > any are outside the specifications this may affect the operation of your
    > system, especially if it is overclocked. Also check the total rated
    > output
    > of your power supply, if it is marginal, overclocking (since more power is
    > required) may also be marginal.
    >
    > * Steps for overclocking your Intel CPU (only after completing the above
    > recommendations):
    >
    > #0. The standard setup for PCI bus and AGP bus speeds are fractions of
    > the clock speed. Make sure the PCI/AGP Bus speeds are instead locked at
    > 33
    > MHz/66 MHz; if the PCI bus speed is more than 36 MHz corruption of data on
    > your hard drives can occur.
    >
    > #1. Increase the clock speed by 5%.
    >
    > #2. Reboot and check for proper operation.
    >
    > #3. If #2 is successful, repeat #1.
    >
    > #4. If #2 is not successful, raise the CPU core voltage by 0.05 volts
    > (in NO case raise this voltage to more than a total of 15%, doing so may
    > instantly destroy your CPU; when the core voltage reaches this limit go to
    > #6.)
    >
    > #5. Go to #2.
    >
    > #6. You have reached the limit of overclocking without changing other
    > factors which may include CPU cooling, System cooling, memory settings.
    > Installing memory capable of higher clock speeds may help. On the other
    > hand, some of these changes may be expensive, and not worth the money for
    > the possible performance increase.
    >
    >
    > * After reaching the highest speed, check operation under full CPU load
    > (use
    > SiSoft Sandra burn-in, other burn-in programs, or intense action 3D
    > accelerated first-person shooter games.) If the system is not stable
    > under
    > heavy load, try reducing the clock speed and/or CPU core voltage (higher
    > voltage means higher operating temperatures.)
    >
    > * Check the installation of the CPU heatsink; new heatsink compound may
    > help
    > CPU cooling. Find directions for using heatsink compound on the internet.
    >
    > * A better than stock heatsink/fan may aid overclocking.
    >
    > * Improved system cooling may aid overclocking.
    >
    > * Exotic cooling of the CPU to room temperature or below can
    > significantly
    > increase top speeds (or not, depending on the individual CPU speed, memory
    > quality, and motherboard.)
    >
    > WARNINGS!!!
    > * Increasing the CPU voltage above 15% over specifications is likely to
    > INSTANTLY destroy the CPU
    > * There is always a chance that when you start fooling around inside the
    > system case of your computer that you may cause damage (the butterfinger
    > factor.)
    >
    > You can find a LOT of additional information on the Internet, including
    > the
    > speeds that others overclockers have reached with your model CPU. One
    > question you must ask yourself is WHY you wish to overclock; I can think
    > of
    > three reasons:
    >
    > #1. Higher performance at little or no expense with your present
    > system.
    >
    > #2. Just because you can, and enjoy experimenting
    >
    > #3. Bragging rights - the highest possible speeds (which is going to
    > require a LOT more money.
    >
    > Don't let this long list intimidate you; just go along step by step.
    >
    > I am posting this on a system using
    > aBit TH7-II (Intel 850 chipset) motherboard
    > Pentium 4 2.6 GHz 400 MHz FSB Northwood CPU
    > PC800 RDRAM 640 MBytes
    > Stock CPU cooling
    > 450 Watt Antec Power Supply
    > With a room ambient temperature of ~ 26 C
    >
    > idle temperatures
    > CPU 40 C
    > motherboard 34 C
    > memory 31 C
    >
    > heavy load temperatures
    > CPU 51 C
    > motherboard 38 C
    > memory 33 C
    >
    > I selected a clock speed in the BIOS of 121 MHz, giving a CPU speed of 121
    > MHz X 26 = 3146 MHz. The CPU will overclock to a higher speed, but the
    > memory will not. To reach a higher CPU speed requires setting the memory
    > clock/CPU clock ratio to other than 1, which reduces performance. Since I
    > just want improved AND reliable performance and not the highest possible
    > clock speed, 3146 suits me fine, though with async setting 3.5 GHz is
    > easily
    > reached.
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > Phil Weldon
    >
    > "__spc__" <> wrote in message
    > news:qhW9f.12815$...
    > | Hi,
    > |
    > | I thought I'd try and eek out some extra speed of my Celeron D, as I'd
    > read
    > | several reports of successful overclocking.
    > |
    > | My set up is an Asrock P4V88+
    > | (http://www.asrock.com/product/product_p4v88 .htm), Celeron D 320
    > (2.4GHz;
    > | http://www.intel.com/products/processor/celeron_D/index.htm), generic
    > 512MB
    > | DDR(400), NVidia GeForce4 MX 400 with 64MB, one case fan in and two out
    > case
    > | fans; at idle, this CPU is ca. 50 deg C.
    > |
    > | The mobo has some overclock technology in it (auto recover from bad
    > config
    > | etc.), and it locks the PCI/AGP clock ratios in at 66 & 33 MHz, while
    > | allowing FSB changes; the multiplier seems locked at 18.
    > |
    > | I thought I'd try an FSB change from 133 to 166 to get 3GHz, but the
    > system
    > | wouldn't boot at all, just a flashing DVD drive light and power light,
    > no
    > | BIOS POST check or anything.
    > |
    > | Am I taking the too smple approach here by just trying to change the
    > FSB?
    > |
    > | Any pointers much appreciated...


    Hi Phil,

    Hmmm, I got the FSB from 133 to 143 and then for one boot to XP, 143 to
    153 - voltages at idel in the BIOS unchanged. 163 and my machine failed to
    even BIOS POST. Back to 153, an unstable system.

    Think I'll stick with the stock clocked CPU. Maybe I have a naff CPU?
     
    __spc__, Nov 3, 2005
    #4
  5. "__spc__" wrote in message...
    > Think I'll stick with the stock clocked CPU. Maybe I have a naff CPU?


    What gives you that idea? Your CPU isn't "naff" as it presumably works fine
    at default speed.

    As far as the overclocking is concerned, there are a number of potential
    reasons for it being unstable that are nothing directly to do with the CPU.
    If, for example, you're not setting the correct memory bus multiplier, it
    could well be the memory falling over, not the processor.

    You need to read Phil's FAQ, look at the options provided by the BIOS on
    your motherboard, and then work it out from there.
    --


    Richard Hopkins
    Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    (replace nospam with pipex in reply address)

    The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
     
    Richard Hopkins, Nov 3, 2005
    #5
  6. __spc__

    Phil Weldon Guest

    '__spc__' wrote, in part:
    | Think I'll stick with the stock clocked CPU. Maybe I have a naff CPU?
    _____

    Well, it takes a bit of patience. If I understand your post correctly, you
    did not try a higher core voltage. Usually overclocking is accomplished by
    alternately inching up FSB and CPU voltage. And if you only tried the three
    higher FSBs (143, 153, 163), then perhaps you should use smaller FSB steps.
    It is also important to keep track of the CPU temperature, along with the
    motherboard temperature and room temperature. Cooling plays an important
    part in overclocking. I'd suggest you keep trying, and that you have a good
    chance with a FSB in 160's (unless your RAM or motherboard aren't up to the
    task.)

    Also, when replying to a post, it is a good idea to trim the quotes. It
    really wasn't necessary to repeat my entire, very long post in your reply.
    The original will always be there in the thread.



    "__spc__" <> wrote in message
    news:8ftaf.1498$...
    | Hi Phil,
    |
    | Hmmm, I got the FSB from 133 to 143 and then for one boot to XP, 143 to
    | 153 - voltages at idel in the BIOS unchanged. 163 and my machine failed
    to
    | even BIOS POST. Back to 153, an unstable system.
    |
    | Think I'll stick with the stock clocked CPU. Maybe I have a naff CPU?
    |
    |
    ..
    ..
    ..
     
    Phil Weldon, Nov 3, 2005
    #6
  7. __spc__

    __spc__ Guest

    "Phil Weldon" <> wrote in message
    news:zwvaf.3799$...
    > '__spc__' wrote, in part:
    > | Think I'll stick with the stock clocked CPU. Maybe I have a naff CPU?
    > _____
    >
    > Well, it takes a bit of patience. If I understand your post correctly,
    > you
    > did not try a higher core voltage. Usually overclocking is accomplished
    > by
    > alternately inching up FSB and CPU voltage. And if you only tried the
    > three
    > higher FSBs (143, 153, 163), then perhaps you should use smaller FSB
    > steps.
    > It is also important to keep track of the CPU temperature, along with the
    > motherboard temperature and room temperature. Cooling plays an important
    > part in overclocking. I'd suggest you keep trying, and that you have a
    > good
    > chance with a FSB in 160's (unless your RAM or motherboard aren't up to
    > the
    > task.)


    The case is using air-cooling, but plenty of fans; the temperature on moving
    to a 143MGz only went up 1 degC in BIOS idle mode for both CPU and chassis;
    the voltages did not change.

    The motherboard is overclock friendly, supposedly, and has PCI/AGP BUS
    speeds locked, and the multiplier of 18 is locked on the CPU.

    OK - I will try 143MHz again and run it at his for some time to see if it's
    stable - this gives a 7% speed increase. Then I'll try incrementing the FSB
    a couple of MHz at a time; and the voltage by a couple of % and see where
    that gets me...

    > Also, when replying to a post, it is a good idea to trim the quotes. It
    > really wasn't necessary to repeat my entire, very long post in your reply.
    > The original will always be there in the thread.


    Apologies for that; I normally remember to...

    Thanks for your help on this; I'm convinced I cab get a lot more out of this
    processor!
     
    __spc__, Nov 4, 2005
    #7
  8. __spc__

    __spc__ Guest

    "Richard Hopkins" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "__spc__" wrote in message...
    >> Think I'll stick with the stock clocked CPU. Maybe I have a naff CPU?

    >
    > What gives you that idea? Your CPU isn't "naff" as it presumably works
    > fine at default speed.


    It does indeed. Going from FSB (MHz) 133 to 143 allows a boot into XP. The
    temps and voltages do NOT change. The system is unstable though and after a
    blast on LOTR Battle for Middle Earth, teh system resets itself and reboots.

    Once, an FSB of 153 booted to XP, but the system locked. Again, in the BIOS
    hardware monitor section, temps and voltages appeared unchanged.

    > As far as the overclocking is concerned, there are a number of potential
    > reasons for it being unstable that are nothing directly to do with the
    > CPU. If, for example, you're not setting the correct memory bus
    > multiplier, it could well be the memory falling over, not the processor.


    I don't think that the option exists to CHANGE the memory multiplier; the
    mobo' locks the PCI/AGP ratio.

    > You need to read Phil's FAQ, look at the options provided by the BIOS on
    > your motherboard, and then work it out from there.


    This was comprehensive and I followed it - that is why I feel I am stuck
    with stock speeds...
     
    __spc__, Nov 4, 2005
    #8
  9. __spc__

    Phil Weldon Guest

    '__spc__' wrote, in part:
    | This was comprehensive and I followed it - that is why I feel I am stuck
    | with stock speeds...
    _____

    Something puzzles me about your replies.

    You state the voltage and temperatures remain the same in the BIOS report.

    I think you misunderstand the CPU voltage and perhaps the CPU temperature
    reported in the BIOS.

    YOU must change the CPU voltage setting in the BIOS to raise it in trying to
    reach a stable overclock. THEN the BIOS WILL report a different CPU
    voltage.

    The temperature the BIOS reports is pretty useless, as the system has just
    been turned on and the CPU is not generating anywhere near its peak.

    You should use an applet like MotherBoard Monitor to track and log CPU
    temperatures when the system is operating and the CPU is doing a lot of
    work, generating much more heat. The BIOS reports really don't tell you
    anything except an extremely high CPU temperature might indicate the CPU
    heatsink isn't properly installed.

    There is a lot of information in my post, gathered from years of posts in
    this newsgroup and from my own experience. I suggest you re-read the
    information, especially the steps in overclocking by raising the FSB speed
    and CPU voltage by small increments. Don't expect to get everything at
    once.

    No one can give EXACT directions for overclocking your system. All we can
    do is try to explain the proceedure. If you get stuck, try again. And then
    try posting some specific questions (and give SPECIFIC information about
    EXACT temperatures, bus settings, and voltages - including whether your
    power supply voltages are in spec.)

    Very few people who use this newsgroup will have your particular
    motherboard, so you need to give informaion about the availiable settings.

    Good luck. Try again. Ask more specific questions when you have them.

    Phil Weldon

    "__spc__" <> wrote in message
    news:B1Paf.1954$...
    |
    | "Richard Hopkins" <> wrote in message
    | news:...
    | > "__spc__" wrote in message...
    | >> Think I'll stick with the stock clocked CPU. Maybe I have a naff CPU?
    | >
    | > What gives you that idea? Your CPU isn't "naff" as it presumably works
    | > fine at default speed.
    |
    | It does indeed. Going from FSB (MHz) 133 to 143 allows a boot into XP.
    The
    | temps and voltages do NOT change. The system is unstable though and after
    a
    | blast on LOTR Battle for Middle Earth, teh system resets itself and
    reboots.
    |
    | Once, an FSB of 153 booted to XP, but the system locked. Again, in the
    BIOS
    | hardware monitor section, temps and voltages appeared unchanged.
    |
    | > As far as the overclocking is concerned, there are a number of potential
    | > reasons for it being unstable that are nothing directly to do with the
    | > CPU. If, for example, you're not setting the correct memory bus
    | > multiplier, it could well be the memory falling over, not the processor.
    |
    | I don't think that the option exists to CHANGE the memory multiplier; the
    | mobo' locks the PCI/AGP ratio.
    |
    | > You need to read Phil's FAQ, look at the options provided by the BIOS on
    | > your motherboard, and then work it out from there.
    |
    | This was comprehensive and I followed it - that is why I feel I am stuck
    | with stock speeds...
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Nov 4, 2005
    #9
  10. "__spc__" <> wrote in message...
    > The case is using air-cooling, but plenty of fans;


    It's not just the number of case fans that's important. In fact the number
    of them is the least significant factor. It's far more important to have a
    well designed case cooling layout - with fans optimally positioned and
    blowing in the correct direction - than it is to simply throw loads of fans
    in at random.

    > the temperature on moving to a 143MGz only went up 1 degC in BIOS idle
    > mode for both CPU and chassis;


    As Phil has already said, the temperature readings you see in the BIOS are
    useless as far as tracking overclocking stability is concerned, as the
    processor is basically sat there doing nothing while you have the BIOS up.
    You need to see how hot it gets when you're actually working the system
    hard, and to do that you need to monitor and log the system health
    parameters when the OS is up, which means Motherboard Monitor or similar.

    > the voltages did not change.


    Erm, you wouldn't/shouldn't have expected them to.

    > OK - I will try 143MHz again and run it at his for some time to see
    > if it's stable - this gives a 7% speed increase.


    Why are you going for 10MHz jumps? 1MHz at a time takes a little longer but
    you will actually learn far more from a more incremental and analytical
    process than you will trying to bite it off in over-large chunks and falling
    back to square one each time.

    > Then I'll try incrementing the FSB a couple of MHz at a time; and the
    > voltage by a couple of % and see where that gets me...


    If it's absolutely rock stable at 143, move on to 144, and so-on til you
    start to notice instability. Once you reach that point - channge one
    parameter - for example the CPU voltage, and see if stability is restored.
    If the system is still shaky, put the voltage back down to default and
    change another parameter - for example the memory bus multiplier - and see
    if that restores stability.

    By working through the process methodically in the manner suggested above,
    you will eliminate guesswork and isolate the bottlenecks in your system with
    precision - which will in turn allow you to find the optimal settings for
    your system.

    > Thanks for your help on this; I'm convinced I cab get a lot more out of
    > this processor!


    I'm sure you can, but you need to remember the old "softly softly catchee
    monkey" adage. It's rarely truer than when applied to overclocking PC's.
    --


    Richard Hopkins
    Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    (replace nospam with pipex in reply address)

    The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
     
    Richard Hopkins, Nov 4, 2005
    #10
  11. __spc__

    __spc__ Guest

    "Richard Hopkins" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "__spc__" <> wrote in message...
    >> The case is using air-cooling, but plenty of fans;


    Noted - I believe my fans are in and out at the right case locations.

    OK, I have MBM and SiSoSandra.

    I will revisit Phil's extensive guide and will go catch me a monkey.

    Many thanks to you and Phil for persevering with me.
     
    __spc__, Nov 5, 2005
    #11
  12. __spc__

    __spc__ Guest

    "Phil Weldon" <> wrote in message
    news:zwvaf.3799$...
    > '__spc__' wrote, in part:
    > | Think I'll stick with the stock clocked CPU. Maybe I have a naff CPU?
    > _____
    >
    > Well, it takes a bit of patience. If I understand your post correctly,
    > you
    > did not try a higher core voltage. Usually overclocking is accomplished
    > by
    > alternately inching up FSB and CPU voltage. And if you only tried the
    > three
    > higher FSBs (143, 153, 163), then perhaps you should use smaller FSB
    > steps.
    > It is also important to keep track of the CPU temperature, along with the
    > motherboard temperature and room temperature. Cooling plays an important
    > part in overclocking. I'd suggest you keep trying, and that you have a
    > good
    > chance with a FSB in 160's (unless your RAM or motherboard aren't up to
    > the
    > task.)


    [snip]

    The system runs very stable at 138MHz FSB, giving 2.39 > 2.48MHz.

    The BIOS (http://www.asrock.com/Drivers/Manual/P4V88 .pdf) does not allow me
    to adjust the voltage...
     
    __spc__, Nov 5, 2005
    #12
  13. __spc__

    Phil Weldon Guest

    '__spc__' wrote, in part:
    | The BIOS (http://www.asrock.com/Drivers/Manual/P4V88 .pdf) does not allow
    me
    | to adjust the voltage...
    _____

    Now with that fact come to light, just run your system at the stock speed.
    A 4% speed increase isn't worth doing, and your motherboard really is not
    overclocking friendly. Generally, for Intel CPUs, Intel CPU chipsets are
    the best for overclocking. Just stay away from Intel manufactured
    motherboards.

    There *may* be ways to increase your CPU voltage, but not anything you want
    to try on your first overclocking. Unless you change to a motherboard that
    is designed for overclocking (with which 3.2 GHz should be doable with your
    current CPU, you're stuck.

    As you can see from this relatively long thread, DETAILS ARE IMPORTANT.
    Knowing the lack of a CPU voltage setting up front would have saved us a lot
    of time. On the other hand, that's how we've all made progress in
    overclocking; learning WHAT details are important - then how to use them.

    Better luck with you next system.

    Phil Weldon

    "__spc__" <> wrote in message
    news:Mv5bf.6506$...
    |
    | "Phil Weldon" <> wrote in message
    | news:zwvaf.3799$...
    | > '__spc__' wrote, in part:
    | > | Think I'll stick with the stock clocked CPU. Maybe I have a naff CPU?
    | > _____
    | >
    | > Well, it takes a bit of patience. If I understand your post correctly,
    | > you
    | > did not try a higher core voltage. Usually overclocking is accomplished
    | > by
    | > alternately inching up FSB and CPU voltage. And if you only tried the
    | > three
    | > higher FSBs (143, 153, 163), then perhaps you should use smaller FSB
    | > steps.
    | > It is also important to keep track of the CPU temperature, along with
    the
    | > motherboard temperature and room temperature. Cooling plays an
    important
    | > part in overclocking. I'd suggest you keep trying, and that you have a
    | > good
    | > chance with a FSB in 160's (unless your RAM or motherboard aren't up to
    | > the
    | > task.)
    |
    | [snip]
    |
    | The system runs very stable at 138MHz FSB, giving 2.39 > 2.48MHz.
    |
    | The BIOS (http://www.asrock.com/Drivers/Manual/P4V88 .pdf) does not allow
    me
    | to adjust the voltage...
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Nov 5, 2005
    #13
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Spark
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    991
    Spark
    Oct 14, 2004
  2. Dick

    ASRock mobo's? P4V88

    Dick, Dec 27, 2004, in forum: ASRock
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    1,295
    Brian Wescombe
    May 25, 2005
  3. Spark
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    865
    Spark
    Oct 13, 2004
  4. Nate

    3.4Ghz overclock on a 2.0Ghz Celeron

    Nate, Oct 27, 2004, in forum: Overclocking
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    790
    Michael Brown
    Oct 31, 2004
  5. Steven Munlo
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,609
Loading...

Share This Page