ASROCK versus ASUS

Discussion in 'ASRock' started by Piotr Makley, Apr 4, 2004.

  1. Piotr Makley

    Piotr Makley Guest

    Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    the main difference between them?

    I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but one
    is built better than the other?

    Any info welcome.
    Piotr Makley, Apr 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. Piotr Makley

    Grebo Guest

    Are they both built by Asustek, I never knew that.

    I have used both and the Asus was far superior in my opinion.

    Graeme


    "Piotr Makley" <> wrote in message
    news:94C1DFDD4495D31E75@130.133.1.4...
    > Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    > the main difference between them?
    >
    > I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    > to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    > features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but one
    > is built better than the other?
    >
    > Any info welcome.
    Grebo, Apr 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. Piotr Makley

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Piotr Makley wrote:
    > Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    > the main difference between them?
    >
    > I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    > to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    > features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but one
    > is built better than the other?
    >
    > Any info welcome.


    Asrock *is* the budget range, they usually have less choice of options and
    slightly less expensive components (From what I gather). It is Asustek's
    attempt at getting a slice of the budget/OEM market without compromising the
    name of their Asus range.

    Seiko did something similar years back, with a difference. They bought out
    the 'Pulsar' brand of watches which are internally identical to the Seiko
    range but sell for about 40% less. (A great buy BTW, I have a 10-year old
    Pulsar that I wear in the shower, swimming-pool etc. and it's running
    perfectly). Seiko found themselves in a situation where they could produce
    their product for a lot less than they were charging for it but didn't want
    their name associated with lower-priced product, they have a good reputation
    and people will pay a premium for a watch with "Seiko" on it. So they
    invented the Pulsar brand. (This was circa 1980) Wise people in the know who
    weren't overly image-conscious bought Pulsar and saved approximately 40% and
    got the exact same ultra-reliable watch. They're made in the same factory,
    they just go to a different 'finishing line' where they are fitted into
    either a Seiko or a Pulsar case.

    It's not quite the same with Asus /Asrock, they use different
    components/features on their Asrock range but the example holds true. Not
    wanting to diminish the name of their premium range in the eye of the
    consumer.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Apr 4, 2004
    #3
  4. Piotr Makley

    Paul Hopwood Guest

    Piotr Makley <> wrote:

    >Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    >the main difference between them?


    >I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    >to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    >features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but one
    >is built better than the other?


    Only worked with one ASRock board I can recall and don't know how much
    it cost but I thought the Asus P4BGV-MX I fitted into a machine
    recently, one of the cheapest integrated S478 boards around (less than
    £40 delivered), was a better board. Don't know if that's
    representative of the range in general.

    --
    >iv< Paul >iv<
    Paul Hopwood, Apr 4, 2004
    #4
  5. Piotr Makley

    BigH2K Guest

    "Paul Hopwood" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Piotr Makley <> wrote:
    >
    > >Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    > >the main difference between them?

    >
    > >I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    > >to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    > >features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but one
    > >is built better than the other?

    >
    > Only worked with one ASRock board I can recall and don't know how much
    > it cost but I thought the Asus P4BGV-MX I fitted into a machine
    > recently, one of the cheapest integrated S478 boards around (less than
    > £40 delivered), was a better board. Don't know if that's
    > representative of the range in general.
    >
    > --
    > >iv< Paul >iv<


    Nothing but good things to say for Asus P3 and P4 boards but I found the few
    Socket A boards to be very problematic.


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.648 / Virus Database: 415 - Release Date: 31/03/2004
    BigH2K, Apr 5, 2004
    #5
  6. Piotr Makley

    Piotr Makley Guest

    "~misfit~" <> wrote:

    > Wise people in the know who
    > weren't overly image-conscious bought Pulsar and saved
    > approximately 40% and got the exact same ultra-reliable watch.
    > They're made in the same factory, they just go to a different
    > 'finishing line' where they are fitted into either a Seiko or
    > a Pulsar case.


    But what about quality control? Is that different?


    > It's not quite the same with Asus /Asrock, they use different
    > components/features on their Asrock range but the example
    > holds true. Not wanting to diminish the name of their premium
    > range in the eye of the consumer.
    Piotr Makley, Apr 5, 2004
    #6
  7. Piotr Makley

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Piotr Makley wrote:
    > "~misfit~" <> wrote:
    >
    >> Wise people in the know who
    >> weren't overly image-conscious bought Pulsar and saved
    >> approximately 40% and got the exact same ultra-reliable watch.
    >> They're made in the same factory, they just go to a different
    >> 'finishing line' where they are fitted into either a Seiko or
    >> a Pulsar case.

    >
    > But what about quality control? Is that different?


    No, not at all. I happened to be in a jewellers shop when a Seiko/Pulsar rep
    was there, just as they bought out the Pulsar brand. He was explaining it to
    the shop owner. The internals come off the same production-line, go through
    the same QT, and are then diverted to either the Seiko or Pulsar 'finishing'
    line (for fitting into cases), depending on demand.

    As I said, my Pulsar hasn't given me a moments trouble in the 10 years I've
    had it. I told a guy who owned a Seiko (that he paid heaps more for) about
    it and he didn't believe me until I showed him that they have the same
    'double
    wave' logo on the back (both watches are 100m water resist).
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Apr 5, 2004
    #7
  8. Piotr Makley

    JAD Guest

    Wow, haven't talked about pulsar watches in some time. I have a
    Pulsar time computer. The last of the LED era. Red and emerald green
    readout, huge and pretty darn ugly ;^) but works like a
    charm. I have another that I haven't thought about for some time, it
    was a graduation present from my folks (circa 1976), you got me
    hunting for it now.


    "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    news:hc2cc.5489$d%...
    > Piotr Makley wrote:
    > > "~misfit~" <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Wise people in the know who
    > >> weren't overly image-conscious bought Pulsar and saved
    > >> approximately 40% and got the exact same ultra-reliable watch.
    > >> They're made in the same factory, they just go to a different
    > >> 'finishing line' where they are fitted into either a Seiko or
    > >> a Pulsar case.

    > >
    > > But what about quality control? Is that different?

    >
    > No, not at all. I happened to be in a jewellers shop when a

    Seiko/Pulsar rep
    > was there, just as they bought out the Pulsar brand. He was

    explaining it to
    > the shop owner. The internals come off the same production-line, go

    through
    > the same QT, and are then diverted to either the Seiko or Pulsar

    'finishing'
    > line (for fitting into cases), depending on demand.
    >
    > As I said, my Pulsar hasn't given me a moments trouble in the 10

    years I've
    > had it. I told a guy who owned a Seiko (that he paid heaps more for)

    about
    > it and he didn't believe me until I showed him that they have the

    same
    > 'double
    > wave' logo on the back (both watches are 100m water resist).
    > --
    > ~misfit~
    >
    >
    >
    JAD, Apr 5, 2004
    #8
  9. Piotr Makley

    ~misfit~ Guest

    JAD wrote:
    > Wow, haven't talked about pulsar watches in some time. I have a
    > Pulsar time computer. The last of the LED era. Red and emerald green
    > readout, huge and pretty darn ugly ;^) but works like a
    > charm. I have another that I haven't thought about for some time, it
    > was a graduation present from my folks (circa 1976), you got me
    > hunting for it now.


    Good watches. Although I'm not sure if Seiko owned them all along or bought
    them as an outlet for their 'off-brand' watches.

    I once had an LED watch, you had to push a button for the time display to
    light up. It was like a monolithic lump of stainless steel on a stainless
    steel band with a couple of buttons on the side and a small blank window in
    it that lit up with the display when you pushed a button. It must have
    weighed 200g. I liked it, wish I still had it (although reading the time was
    a two-handed job). Then LCDs got cheaper and LED watches disappeared AFAIK.
    I bought mine in about '76 too, man it was high-tech. <g>.
    --
    ~misfit~

    > "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    > news:hc2cc.5489$d%...
    >> Piotr Makley wrote:
    >>> "~misfit~" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Wise people in the know who
    >>>> weren't overly image-conscious bought Pulsar and saved
    >>>> approximately 40% and got the exact same ultra-reliable watch.
    >>>> They're made in the same factory, they just go to a different
    >>>> 'finishing line' where they are fitted into either a Seiko or
    >>>> a Pulsar case.
    >>>
    >>> But what about quality control? Is that different?

    >>
    >> No, not at all. I happened to be in a jewellers shop when a
    >> Seiko/Pulsar rep was there, just as they bought out the Pulsar
    >> brand. He was explaining it to the shop owner. The internals come
    >> off the same production-line, go through the same QT, and are then
    >> diverted to either the Seiko or Pulsar 'finishing' line (for fitting
    >> into cases), depending on demand.
    >>
    >> As I said, my Pulsar hasn't given me a moments trouble in the 10
    >> years I've had it. I told a guy who owned a Seiko (that he paid
    >> heaps more for) about it and he didn't believe me until I showed him
    >> that they have the same 'double
    >> wave' logo on the back (both watches are 100m water resist).
    >> --
    >> ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Apr 5, 2004
    #9
  10. Piotr Makley

    K-Tel Ronco Guest

    <SNIP>
    " I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range "

    I have to agree with that. In a number of years of building The Asrock is
    the only boards I Have ever had a failure on (and I have used some crap).
    Not a catastrophic failure I may add, rear usb ports died. However I bought
    it thinking it was a quality item. I forget the model, was one of these
    maplin bundles that at the time seemed like a great deal.
    K-Tel Ronco, Apr 5, 2004
    #10
  11. Piotr Makley

    ElJerid Guest

    "Piotr Makley" <> wrote in message
    news:94C1DFDD4495D31E75@130.133.1.4...
    > Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    > the main difference between them?
    >
    > I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    > to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    > features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but one
    > is built better than the other?
    >


    I've seen somewhere that Asrock was a Chinese daughter company of Astek
    intended to allow Asus to compete with companies like Elite eo in the
    motherboard entry market. So recently I decided to purchase my first Asrock
    P4VT8, where the box mentioned plenty of nice features, all at a very nice
    price.
    When installing however, I discovered a lot of "anomalies". Some examples:
    - the board has 2 SATA connectors, but drivers have to be loaded from
    diskettes at initial setup in order to recognize SATA drives;
    - when shutting down the computer, power is still delivered to on-board USB
    connectors, resulting in USB devices (6 in 1 card readers, for ex)with leds
    always on;
    - the board crashes randomly (up to 3 - 4 times a day);
    - the temp and voltage reports of the board are wrong: cpu temp is mostly at
    72°C (although feeling cold), -12 V is reported -0.17 V, and so on.
    - there is no dual channel DDR available (but I must say dual-channel is not
    mentioned on the box);
    - installation of windows 2000 worked normally, but install of Win XP was
    totally impossible (Win setup freezes early, at "press F6 to load additional
    disk drivers").
    This could have been an isolated single bad experience, but I did some
    search on the net and encountered a lot of idenditical or similar
    experiences.
    I always loved Asus and installed many of those boards for P3 and P4 without
    any problem. My first trial with Asrock was a total failure and I even
    couldn' t get valuable support. I soon replaced the P4VT8 by an Asus P4P800
    (price difference is not that big), and all problems above disappeared.
    This was my first and last Asrock !!!
    ElJerid, Apr 5, 2004
    #11
  12. Piotr Makley

    Fishman Guest

    "Piotr Makley" <> wrote in message
    news:94C1DFDD4495D31E75@130.133.1.4...
    > Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    > the main difference between them?
    >
    > I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    > to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    > features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but one
    > is built better than the other?
    >
    > Any info welcome.


    I have used quite a number of ASRock boards for socket "A" builds.
    (Haven't built too many P4 based systems recently and where I have these
    have needed a top of the range mobo with all the accessories)

    K7S8X for several months, FSB up to 333MHz and more recently the K7S8XE
    which does 400MHz FSB.
    Also the K7VM2 where a uATX board is needed with o/b VGA.

    All models are basic in that they have minimum bells and whistles.
    The Phoenix bios offers little scope for overclockers.
    Don't expect a manual which tells you how to build a computer and set every
    bios setting.

    There is however a cool video on the driver cd of some attractive Asian
    female telling you how to build your PC, not too informative for the
    experienced builder, but fun to watch. She struggles with her English
    pronunciations a bit.

    That said, all the ASRock boards I've used have behaved very well and have
    performed flawlessly.
    Rather like their sales literature ........ Solid as a rock ......ASRock

    Compared to PChips, Elite or ECS and Syntax etc. these boards come at a
    budget price without the budget bugs.

    AAAA+ recommended.
    Fishman, Apr 5, 2004
    #12
  13. "ElJerid" <> wrote in message
    news:9z8cc.60886$-ops.be...
    >
    > "Piotr Makley" <> wrote in message
    > news:94C1DFDD4495D31E75@130.133.1.4...
    > > Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    > > the main difference between them?
    > >
    > > I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    > > to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    > > features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but

    one
    > > is built better than the other?
    > >

    >
    > I've seen somewhere that Asrock was a Chinese daughter company of

    Astek
    > intended to allow Asus to compete with companies like Elite eo in

    the
    > motherboard entry market. So recently I decided to purchase my first

    Asrock
    > P4VT8, where the box mentioned plenty of nice features, all at a

    very nice
    > price.
    > When installing however, I discovered a lot of "anomalies". Some

    examples:
    > - the board has 2 SATA connectors, but drivers have to be loaded

    from
    > diskettes at initial setup in order to recognize SATA drives;


    Isn't this a condition of Windows rather than the motherboard? AFAIK,
    Windows XP, and obviously older versions, requires drivers to be
    loaded prior to installing.
    Peter A. Stavrakoglou, Apr 5, 2004
    #13
  14. Piotr Makley

    CBFalconer Guest

    JAD wrote:
    >
    > Wow, haven't talked about pulsar watches in some time. I have a
    > Pulsar time computer. The last of the LED era. Red and emerald
    > green readout, huge and pretty darn ugly ;^) but works like a
    > charm. I have another that I haven't thought about for some time,
    > it was a graduation present from my folks (circa 1976), you got
    > me hunting for it now.


    I have an Intel offering from the same period. It was a prize for
    my first version of floating point for the 8080, submitted to the
    user group. Nowadays I spend no more than $10 US for an LCD
    display calendar/stop watch combo, which lasts about 5 years.

    --
    A: Because it fouls the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?
    A: Top-posting.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
    CBFalconer, Apr 5, 2004
    #14
  15. ElJerid wrote:
    > "Piotr Makley" <> wrote in message
    > news:94C1DFDD4495D31E75@130.133.1.4...
    >
    >>Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    >>the main difference between them?
    >>
    >>I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    >>to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    >>features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but one
    >>is built better than the other?
    >>

    >
    >
    > I've seen somewhere that Asrock was a Chinese daughter company of Astek
    > intended to allow Asus to compete with companies like Elite eo in the
    > motherboard entry market. So recently I decided to purchase my first Asrock
    > P4VT8, where the box mentioned plenty of nice features, all at a very nice
    > price.
    > When installing however, I discovered a lot of "anomalies". Some examples:
    > - the board has 2 SATA connectors, but drivers have to be loaded from
    > diskettes at initial setup in order to recognize SATA drives;


    That's about the OS, not the mobo

    > - when shutting down the computer, power is still delivered to on-board USB
    > connectors, resulting in USB devices (6 in 1 card readers, for ex)with leds
    > always on;


    That's normal. Same with PS/2 ports. ATX always has some power going to
    the ports.

    > - the board crashes randomly (up to 3 - 4 times a day);


    The board doesn't crash, windows does.

    > - the temp and voltage reports of the board are wrong: cpu temp is mostly at
    > 72°C (although feeling cold), -12 V is reported -0.17 V, and so on.


    Where did you get those readings?

    > - there is no dual channel DDR available (but I must say dual-channel is not
    > mentioned on the box);


    You don't know your chipsets.

    > - installation of windows 2000 worked normally, but install of Win XP was
    > totally impossible (Win setup freezes early, at "press F6 to load additional
    > disk drivers").


    This is a windows issue, not a mobo issue.

    > This could have been an isolated single bad experience, but I did some
    > search on the net and encountered a lot of idenditical or similar
    > experiences.


    Because there are a lot of similarly inexperienced people who know just
    enough to get themselves stuck.

    > I always loved Asus and installed many of those boards for P3 and P4 without
    > any problem. My first trial with Asrock was a total failure and I even
    > couldn' t get valuable support. I soon replaced the P4VT8 by an Asus P4P800
    > (price difference is not that big), and all problems above disappeared.
    > This was my first and last Asrock !!!


    ASUS certainly make good boards. I like ASUS and Gigabyte. Had a board
    die just inside of warranty, took it to the distributor, got a new board
    a couple of weeks later that was better than the one I had. So, my wife
    got an upgrade for the price of a few sticks of ram and a bottom of the
    range CPU. I'd certainly consider giving Asrock a try if it met my needs
    and price was important.



    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo
    sooky grumper, Apr 5, 2004
    #15
  16. Piotr Makley

    Piotr Makley Guest

    "~misfit~" <> wrote:

    >>> Wise people in the know who
    >>> weren't overly image-conscious bought Pulsar and saved
    >>> approximately 40% and got the exact same ultra-reliable
    >>> watch. They're made in the same factory, they just go to a
    >>> different 'finishing line' where they are fitted into either
    >>> a Seiko or a Pulsar case.


    >>
    >> But what about quality control? Is that different?
    >>


    > No, not at all. I happened to be in a jewellers shop when a
    > Seiko/Pulsar rep was there, just as they bought out the Pulsar
    > brand. He was explaining it to the shop owner. The internals
    > come off the same production-line, go through the same QT, and
    > are then diverted to either the Seiko or Pulsar 'finishing'
    > line (for fitting into cases), depending on demand.


    Maybe the diverting is done based on the better versus worse
    performing units? In other words they are all to spec but the very
    best go one way and the poorer one go another way?
    Piotr Makley, Apr 5, 2004
    #16
  17. Piotr Makley

    ElJerid Guest

    "Peter A. Stavrakoglou" <> wrote in message
    news:LXacc.7071$...
    >
    > "ElJerid" <> wrote in message
    > news:9z8cc.60886$-ops.be...
    > >
    > > "Piotr Makley" <> wrote in message
    > > news:94C1DFDD4495D31E75@130.133.1.4...
    > > > Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    > > > the main difference between them?
    > > >
    > > > I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    > > > to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    > > > features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but

    > one
    > > > is built better than the other?
    > > >

    > >
    > > I've seen somewhere that Asrock was a Chinese daughter company of

    > Astek
    > > intended to allow Asus to compete with companies like Elite eo in

    > the
    > > motherboard entry market. So recently I decided to purchase my first

    > Asrock
    > > P4VT8, where the box mentioned plenty of nice features, all at a

    > very nice
    > > price.
    > > When installing however, I discovered a lot of "anomalies". Some

    > examples:
    > > - the board has 2 SATA connectors, but drivers have to be loaded

    > from
    > > diskettes at initial setup in order to recognize SATA drives;

    >
    > Isn't this a condition of Windows rather than the motherboard? AFAIK,
    > Windows XP, and obviously older versions, requires drivers to be
    > loaded prior to installing.
    >
    >

    I know this, but the installation freezes just befor the stage where it's
    normally asked to hit F6 and insert the floppy with the drivers. Windows
    2000 however installs without problems (except later crashes), and the Win
    XP CD was checked on 2 other computers with Asus mobos and installed
    correctly. Only the Asrock freezes at install.
    ElJerid, Apr 5, 2004
    #17
  18. Piotr Makley

    ElJerid Guest


    > > I've seen somewhere that Asrock was a Chinese daughter company of Astek
    > > intended to allow Asus to compete with companies like Elite eo in the
    > > motherboard entry market. So recently I decided to purchase my first

    Asrock
    > > P4VT8, where the box mentioned plenty of nice features, all at a very

    nice
    > > price.
    > > When installing however, I discovered a lot of "anomalies". Some

    examples:
    > > - the board has 2 SATA connectors, but drivers have to be loaded from
    > > diskettes at initial setup in order to recognize SATA drives;

    >
    > That's about the OS, not the mobo


    That's what I thought first, so I returned the Win XP CD to the dealer where
    it was tested and appeared to install without problems. So I took it back
    home and tried an install on 2 othersPC's without problems.

    > > - when shutting down the computer, power is still delivered to on-board

    USB
    > > connectors, resulting in USB devices (6 in 1 card readers, for ex)with

    leds
    > > always on;

    >
    > That's normal. Same with PS/2 ports. ATX always has some power going to
    > the ports.


    Right, but not at the point that the leds on a card reader remain on when
    power is down.

    > > - the board crashes randomly (up to 3 - 4 times a day);

    >
    > The board doesn't crash, windows does.


    Also just after a clean install, and without any application installed or
    running ???

    > > - the temp and voltage reports of the board are wrong: cpu temp is

    mostly at
    > > 72°C (although feeling cold), -12 V is reported -0.17 V, and so on.

    >
    > Where did you get those readings?


    As well from Sandra as from Aida 32

    > > - there is no dual channel DDR available (but I must say dual-channel is

    not
    > > mentioned on the box);

    >
    > You don't know your chipsets.


    Right. That's why I mentioned it was not on the box, but only an expectation
    from me due to the fact that I always used i868 or i875.

    > > - installation of windows 2000 worked normally, but install of Win XP

    was
    > > totally impossible (Win setup freezes early, at "press F6 to load

    additional
    > > disk drivers").

    >
    > This is a windows issue, not a mobo issue.


    Don't believe. I think it's an incompatibility between OS and the P4VT8, or
    the P4VT8 is defective !
    >
    > > This could have been an isolated single bad experience, but I did some
    > > search on the net and encountered a lot of idenditical or similar
    > > experiences.

    >
    > Because there are a lot of similarly inexperienced people who know just
    > enough to get themselves stuck.


    Maybe, but there are many, all with analog problems. And although not an
    "expert", I'm not "inexperienced", as I installed more than 100 individual
    PC's (I mean not auto-installs through a network), mostly in sophisticated
    video capture and editing configurations..
    ElJerid, Apr 5, 2004
    #18
  19. Piotr Makley

    Fishman Guest

    "ElJerid" <> wrote in message
    news:9z8cc.60886$-ops.be...
    >
    > "Piotr Makley" <> wrote in message
    > news:94C1DFDD4495D31E75@130.133.1.4...
    > > Asrock and Asus motherboards are both made by Asustek. So what is
    > > the main difference between them?
    > >
    > > I am told that Asrock is a cheaper range so is one range positoned
    > > to be cheap and the other to be more expensive but with more
    > > features? Or do both ranges aim at broadly the same market but one
    > > is built better than the other?
    > >

    >
    > I've seen somewhere that Asrock was a Chinese daughter company of Astek
    > intended to allow Asus to compete with companies like Elite eo in the
    > motherboard entry market. So recently I decided to purchase my first

    Asrock
    > P4VT8, where the box mentioned plenty of nice features, all at a very nice
    > price.
    > When installing however, I discovered a lot of "anomalies". Some examples:
    > - the board has 2 SATA connectors, but drivers have to be loaded from
    > diskettes at initial setup in order to recognize SATA drives;
    > - when shutting down the computer, power is still delivered to on-board

    USB
    > connectors, resulting in USB devices (6 in 1 card readers, for ex)with

    leds
    > always on;
    > - the board crashes randomly (up to 3 - 4 times a day);
    > - the temp and voltage reports of the board are wrong: cpu temp is mostly

    at
    > 72°C (although feeling cold), -12 V is reported -0.17 V, and so on.
    > - there is no dual channel DDR available (but I must say dual-channel is

    not
    > mentioned on the box);
    > - installation of windows 2000 worked normally, but install of Win XP was
    > totally impossible (Win setup freezes early, at "press F6 to load

    additional
    > disk drivers").
    > This could have been an isolated single bad experience, but I did some
    > search on the net and encountered a lot of idenditical or similar
    > experiences.
    > I always loved Asus and installed many of those boards for P3 and P4

    without
    > any problem. My first trial with Asrock was a total failure and I even
    > couldn' t get valuable support. I soon replaced the P4VT8 by an Asus

    P4P800
    > (price difference is not that big), and all problems above disappeared.
    > This was my first and last Asrock !!!



    Sounds like you had bad memory to me.
    Fishman, Apr 5, 2004
    #19
  20. ElJerid wrote:
    >>>I've seen somewhere that Asrock was a Chinese daughter company of Astek
    >>>intended to allow Asus to compete with companies like Elite eo in the
    >>>motherboard entry market. So recently I decided to purchase my first

    >
    > Asrock
    >
    >>>P4VT8, where the box mentioned plenty of nice features, all at a very

    >
    > nice
    >
    >>>price.
    >>>When installing however, I discovered a lot of "anomalies". Some

    >
    > examples:
    >
    >>>- the board has 2 SATA connectors, but drivers have to be loaded from
    >>>diskettes at initial setup in order to recognize SATA drives;

    >>
    >>That's about the OS, not the mobo

    >
    >
    > That's what I thought first, so I returned the Win XP CD to the dealer where
    > it was tested and appeared to install without problems. So I took it back
    > home and tried an install on 2 othersPC's without problems.


    *sigh*

    It's not about the cd. And the hardware was not identical.

    >
    >
    >>>- when shutting down the computer, power is still delivered to on-board

    >
    > USB
    >
    >>>connectors, resulting in USB devices (6 in 1 card readers, for ex)with

    >
    > leds
    >
    >>>always on;

    >>
    >>That's normal. Same with PS/2 ports. ATX always has some power going to
    >>the ports.

    >
    >
    > Right, but not at the point that the leds on a card reader remain on when
    > power is down.
    >
    >
    >>>- the board crashes randomly (up to 3 - 4 times a day);

    >>
    >>The board doesn't crash, windows does.

    >
    >
    > Also just after a clean install, and without any application installed or
    > running ???


    Yes. You need to learn:
    1. about your hardware, and just about hardware in general
    2. about software, and specifically OSes

    >
    >
    >>>- the temp and voltage reports of the board are wrong: cpu temp is

    >
    > mostly at
    >
    >>>72°C (although feeling cold), -12 V is reported -0.17 V, and so on.

    >>
    >>Where did you get those readings?

    >
    >
    > As well from Sandra as from Aida 32


    Try the BIOS next time, but that should be identical. If not, you'll
    discover why many people don't trust those programs you've cited.

    >
    >
    >>>- there is no dual channel DDR available (but I must say dual-channel is

    >
    > not
    >
    >>>mentioned on the box);

    >>
    >>You don't know your chipsets.

    >
    >
    > Right. That's why I mentioned it was not on the box, but only an expectation
    > from me due to the fact that I always used i868 or i875.


    Again, it has abolutely no bearing here, except to illustrate that you
    know just enough to get yourself in strife (or get yourself
    disappointed). It's not a bad thing, we all start out somewhere.

    >
    >
    >>>- installation of windows 2000 worked normally, but install of Win XP

    >
    > was
    >
    >>>totally impossible (Win setup freezes early, at "press F6 to load

    >
    > additional
    >
    >>>disk drivers").

    >>
    >>This is a windows issue, not a mobo issue.

    >
    >
    > Don't believe. I think it's an incompatibility between OS and the P4VT8, or
    > the P4VT8 is defective !


    There are hardware incompatibilities. An 'OS incompatibility' is a
    problem with the OS and the programming.

    >
    >>>This could have been an isolated single bad experience, but I did some
    >>>search on the net and encountered a lot of idenditical or similar
    >>>experiences.

    >>
    >>Because there are a lot of similarly inexperienced people who know just
    >>enough to get themselves stuck.

    >
    >
    > Maybe, but there are many, all with analog problems.


    You mean analogous, right?

    > And although not an
    > "expert", I'm not "inexperienced", as I installed more than 100 individual
    > PC's (I mean not auto-installs through a network), mostly in sophisticated
    > video capture and editing configurations..


    Yes, anyone can click 'yes' and 'OK' and 'I Accept' and fill in a few
    numbers. You're at the level of knowledge where if you push yourself a
    little further, you'll break through and understand how much there is to
    know, and how little any one person will be able to know in terms of
    computers (both hardware and software).

    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo
    sooky grumper, Apr 5, 2004
    #20
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