Asus A7N8X Deluxe

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Stefan Ulrich Fischer, Oct 20, 2006.

  1. Hi,
    I don't know much about computers, but I have a Asus A7N8X Deluxe still
    with my Duron 1200. I like to upgrade the CPU, because they are very
    cheap right now. There is way to much info for me on the internet, so
    what about the Athlon XP 2500? Is this a good choice? I don't play
    games very much, but my CPU is way to slow. Please help.
    Stefan Ulrich Fischer, Oct 20, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Stefan Ulrich Fischer

    Kenny Guest

    I ahve Athlon XP 2500 running on this board, same one I'm having difficulty
    figuring out front panel connectors, see post below this.
    You may have to flash the BIOS and make sure you have the most recent
    chipset drivers.

    --
    Kenny Cargill
    "Stefan Ulrich Fischer" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > I don't know much about computers, but I have a Asus A7N8X Deluxe still
    > with my Duron 1200. I like to upgrade the CPU, because they are very
    > cheap right now. There is way to much info for me on the internet, so
    > what about the Athlon XP 2500? Is this a good choice? I don't play
    > games very much, but my CPU is way to slow. Please help.
    >
    Kenny, Oct 20, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Stefan Ulrich Fischer

    Paul Guest

    Stefan Ulrich Fischer wrote:
    >
    > Hi,
    > I don't know much about computers, but I have a Asus A7N8X Deluxe still
    > with my Duron 1200. I like to upgrade the CPU, because they are very
    > cheap right now. There is way to much info for me on the internet, so
    > what about the Athlon XP 2500? Is this a good choice? I don't play
    > games very much, but my CPU is way to slow. Please help.


    Well, it will be a little faster. (Whether it is a wise upgrade, depends
    on how much you are paying for the processor. You can also get a cheap
    motherboard, and a more modern processor, and reuse your old video card
    and memory. But what you propose is certainly a lot less work.)

    You can start here:

    http://support.asus.com/cpusupport/cpusupport.aspx?SLanguage=en-us

    The returned list for A7N8X Deluxe is here:

    http://support.asus.com/cpusupport/...e=1&name=A7N8X Deluxe&SLanguage=en-us&cache=1

    Athlon XP 2500+(333 MHZ FSB)(Model 10)(Barton) 1.04 1002
    Check PCB and BIOS versions before flashing BIOS!

    The A7N8X Deluxe come in several revisions. The "1.04" number is the
    minimum motherboard revision. If you look at the motherboard
    surface, in white letters it should say "A7N8X Deluxe" and nearby
    it would say "Rev. 1.04".

    The minimum BIOS revision listed is 1002 or later. There may be
    a sticker on the motherboard BIOS flash chip (the chip in s square
    socket), and the release number of the BIOS could be printed on
    the label. If you have already flashed the BIOS, you may have to
    check the BIOS screen(s), to figure out what you flashed it with.

    If the BIOS revision is too old, it may need to be upgraded _before_
    you install a new processor. But rather than complicate matters,
    you can check the particulars of your motherboard and report
    back here if you need further help. Asus sticks BIOS updates for
    several revisions of motherboard, on the same web page, and the
    owners of those motherboards must use caution in selecting the
    correct file download for the job.

    A "retail" version of chip, may come with a heatsink/fan designed
    for the processor. Chips of the "OEM" variety, do not ship with
    a heatsink/fan. While your Duron has a cooler on it already, it
    is hard to say whether that is the best cooler for the job. (I
    use an aftermarket Zalman 7000AlCu cooler on my AthlonXP mobile,
    and it stays quite cool.)

    It should be a simple matter of installing the new processor, putting
    some thermal paste on the silicon die of the processor (being careful
    not to smear it on the bridges on the top of the chip). Only a thin
    film of thermal paste is required. The purpose of the thermal paste,
    is to displace any air gaps between the cooler and the processor.

    Be careful when installing the heatsink on the top of any processor
    with a bare silicon die. If the heatsink is tilted on an angle, and
    is not perfectly flat, you can chip the edges of the silicon die when
    installing it. In my case, one of the benefits of the Zalman 7000
    series cooler, is it fastens in place with screws, and it less dangerous
    to install than a cooler with clips. Some people have used small rubber
    disks with adhesive on them, and four disks are placed, one in each
    corner of the top of the CPU package. The rubber bumpers help
    prevent the cooler from being mounted on an angle. The rubber material
    must be carefully selected, to be the same height as the silicon die.
    If the disks were significantly taller than the silicon die, a lot
    of the compressive force applied by the heatsink clip, goes into compressing
    the rubber bumpers. Leaving less force to keep the heatsink in contact
    with the silicon die. Fortunately, thermal paste does not require a lot
    of retention force, to work well, so this is not a big issue.

    What to use for a thermal paste ? You may be able to pick up some
    thermal paste, from the same source as your new processor. Every
    person has their own views on which brands are best, and the only
    product I don't really like, is some of the cheap zinc pastes that
    have a liquid consistency. The problem with those products, is the
    carrier tends to leave the area between CPU and heatsink, and no
    matter what product you select, you do want it to stay between the
    heatsink and CPU. I currently have a tube of AS3, that has lasted
    me forever. It seems to work well enough.

    I find the safest way to install a heatsink/fan, is to remove
    the motherboard from the computer case. That allows me to visually
    examine the fit of the assembly on all four sides, before installing
    clips or tightening screws. For this method to work, the combined
    dimensions of motherboard plus cooler, must fit into the opening
    of your computer case. I have one computer case, where a crossbar
    prevents installing a motherboard with the cooler already in place.
    I find there is a small bit more risk, if I have to install a
    heatsink while the motherboard is still inside the computer case.

    Some people have damaged their motherboard, due to the technique
    they use to push down on the heatsink clip. Some clips have a
    raised bit of metal on the top of the clip, and it is tempting
    to use a slot head scredriver, to push on the clip. That can slide
    off, and hit the motherboard. Sometimes the impact will cut a copper
    track or break off a resistor on the motherboard. A recommended tool
    for the job, is a "hex driver". The six sided opening of a small
    hex driver is placed over the raised bit of metal, and that helps to
    hold the hex driver in place. It cannot slide off as easily, so the
    risk of damage is reduced.

    You might be able to find installation guides, for putting on the
    heatsink. I found one here, but the pictures are pretty poor in
    this one.

    http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/Installation_Poster_Eng.pdf

    Paul
    Paul, Oct 20, 2006
    #3
  4. Stefan Ulrich Fischer

    Dodo Guest

    put a xp 3000 in it and a gig of ram and watch it perform holy fast....dont
    need anything more,,,,the new technology isnt any faster....i mean can the
    net open up faster then i can push the button?
    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > Stefan Ulrich Fischer wrote:
    >>
    >> Hi,
    >> I don't know much about computers, but I have a Asus A7N8X Deluxe still
    >> with my Duron 1200. I like to upgrade the CPU, because they are very
    >> cheap right now. There is way to much info for me on the internet, so
    >> what about the Athlon XP 2500? Is this a good choice? I don't play
    >> games very much, but my CPU is way to slow. Please help.

    >
    > Well, it will be a little faster. (Whether it is a wise upgrade, depends
    > on how much you are paying for the processor. You can also get a cheap
    > motherboard, and a more modern processor, and reuse your old video card
    > and memory. But what you propose is certainly a lot less work.)
    >
    > You can start here:
    >
    > http://support.asus.com/cpusupport/cpusupport.aspx?SLanguage=en-us
    >
    > The returned list for A7N8X Deluxe is here:
    >
    > http://support.asus.com/cpusupport/...e=1&name=A7N8X Deluxe&SLanguage=en-us&cache=1
    >
    > Athlon XP 2500+(333 MHZ FSB)(Model 10)(Barton) 1.04 1002
    > Check PCB and BIOS versions before flashing BIOS!
    >
    > The A7N8X Deluxe come in several revisions. The "1.04" number is the
    > minimum motherboard revision. If you look at the motherboard
    > surface, in white letters it should say "A7N8X Deluxe" and nearby
    > it would say "Rev. 1.04".
    >
    > The minimum BIOS revision listed is 1002 or later. There may be
    > a sticker on the motherboard BIOS flash chip (the chip in s square
    > socket), and the release number of the BIOS could be printed on
    > the label. If you have already flashed the BIOS, you may have to
    > check the BIOS screen(s), to figure out what you flashed it with.
    >
    > If the BIOS revision is too old, it may need to be upgraded _before_
    > you install a new processor. But rather than complicate matters,
    > you can check the particulars of your motherboard and report
    > back here if you need further help. Asus sticks BIOS updates for
    > several revisions of motherboard, on the same web page, and the
    > owners of those motherboards must use caution in selecting the
    > correct file download for the job.
    >
    > A "retail" version of chip, may come with a heatsink/fan designed
    > for the processor. Chips of the "OEM" variety, do not ship with
    > a heatsink/fan. While your Duron has a cooler on it already, it
    > is hard to say whether that is the best cooler for the job. (I
    > use an aftermarket Zalman 7000AlCu cooler on my AthlonXP mobile,
    > and it stays quite cool.)
    >
    > It should be a simple matter of installing the new processor, putting
    > some thermal paste on the silicon die of the processor (being careful
    > not to smear it on the bridges on the top of the chip). Only a thin
    > film of thermal paste is required. The purpose of the thermal paste,
    > is to displace any air gaps between the cooler and the processor.
    >
    > Be careful when installing the heatsink on the top of any processor
    > with a bare silicon die. If the heatsink is tilted on an angle, and
    > is not perfectly flat, you can chip the edges of the silicon die when
    > installing it. In my case, one of the benefits of the Zalman 7000
    > series cooler, is it fastens in place with screws, and it less dangerous
    > to install than a cooler with clips. Some people have used small rubber
    > disks with adhesive on them, and four disks are placed, one in each
    > corner of the top of the CPU package. The rubber bumpers help
    > prevent the cooler from being mounted on an angle. The rubber material
    > must be carefully selected, to be the same height as the silicon die.
    > If the disks were significantly taller than the silicon die, a lot
    > of the compressive force applied by the heatsink clip, goes into
    > compressing
    > the rubber bumpers. Leaving less force to keep the heatsink in contact
    > with the silicon die. Fortunately, thermal paste does not require a lot
    > of retention force, to work well, so this is not a big issue.
    >
    > What to use for a thermal paste ? You may be able to pick up some
    > thermal paste, from the same source as your new processor. Every
    > person has their own views on which brands are best, and the only
    > product I don't really like, is some of the cheap zinc pastes that
    > have a liquid consistency. The problem with those products, is the
    > carrier tends to leave the area between CPU and heatsink, and no
    > matter what product you select, you do want it to stay between the
    > heatsink and CPU. I currently have a tube of AS3, that has lasted
    > me forever. It seems to work well enough.
    >
    > I find the safest way to install a heatsink/fan, is to remove
    > the motherboard from the computer case. That allows me to visually
    > examine the fit of the assembly on all four sides, before installing
    > clips or tightening screws. For this method to work, the combined
    > dimensions of motherboard plus cooler, must fit into the opening
    > of your computer case. I have one computer case, where a crossbar
    > prevents installing a motherboard with the cooler already in place.
    > I find there is a small bit more risk, if I have to install a
    > heatsink while the motherboard is still inside the computer case.
    >
    > Some people have damaged their motherboard, due to the technique
    > they use to push down on the heatsink clip. Some clips have a
    > raised bit of metal on the top of the clip, and it is tempting
    > to use a slot head scredriver, to push on the clip. That can slide
    > off, and hit the motherboard. Sometimes the impact will cut a copper
    > track or break off a resistor on the motherboard. A recommended tool
    > for the job, is a "hex driver". The six sided opening of a small
    > hex driver is placed over the raised bit of metal, and that helps to
    > hold the hex driver in place. It cannot slide off as easily, so the
    > risk of damage is reduced.
    >
    > You might be able to find installation guides, for putting on the
    > heatsink. I found one here, but the pictures are pretty poor in
    > this one.
    >
    > http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/Installation_Poster_Eng.pdf
    >
    > Paul
    Dodo, Oct 20, 2006
    #4
  5. Stefan Ulrich Fischer

    sdlomi2 Guest

    "Stefan Ulrich Fischer" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    > I don't know much about computers, but I have a Asus A7N8X Deluxe still
    > with my Duron 1200. I like to upgrade the CPU, because they are very
    > cheap right now. There is way to much info for me on the internet, so
    > what about the Athlon XP 2500? Is this a good choice? I don't play
    > games very much, but my CPU is way to slow. Please help.
    >

    If you can get a 2500 Mobile Barton, it has 512 L2 cache, uses 1.45
    stock volts across the cpu(your board won't show that low, but 1.65 volts is
    ok), you set FSB at 192 (up to 200 or a tad more), set multiplier at 12.5,
    and it'll run at 2400 mhz as slick as a button. Thermaltake fan keeps it
    cool, no bsod, no losing cmos-settings. Actually, stock fan will suffice
    with good fan-intake in front bottom and rear top of case.
    You'll need ram that will run at 200 mhz--good Kingston is fine & Newegg
    or Office Depot may have it. Ensure the ram is set to run at 100%with the
    cpu's fsb, not 120%, 80%, or any of that asymmetrical junk! Mine's been
    running here for 2-3 years. Best-running system I've ever had.
    BTW, I've bought 2 mobile 2500-Barton's on Ebay and they do fine on
    other systems I have built for friends. Very little diff. in $ between this
    cpu and the XP 2400's with unlocked mult--plus they don't have the 512 L2
    cache! HTH & good luck. s
    sdlomi2, Oct 21, 2006
    #5
  6. Stefan Ulrich Fischer

    Dodo Guest

    nice set up! wish i could get one of those mobiles hehehe!
    "sdlomi2" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:%e_g.982$...
    >
    > "Stefan Ulrich Fischer" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi,
    >> I don't know much about computers, but I have a Asus A7N8X Deluxe still
    >> with my Duron 1200. I like to upgrade the CPU, because they are very
    >> cheap right now. There is way to much info for me on the internet, so
    >> what about the Athlon XP 2500? Is this a good choice? I don't play
    >> games very much, but my CPU is way to slow. Please help.
    >>

    > If you can get a 2500 Mobile Barton, it has 512 L2 cache, uses 1.45
    > stock volts across the cpu(your board won't show that low, but 1.65 volts
    > is ok), you set FSB at 192 (up to 200 or a tad more), set multiplier at
    > 12.5, and it'll run at 2400 mhz as slick as a button. Thermaltake fan
    > keeps it cool, no bsod, no losing cmos-settings. Actually, stock fan will
    > suffice with good fan-intake in front bottom and rear top of case.
    > You'll need ram that will run at 200 mhz--good Kingston is fine &
    > Newegg or Office Depot may have it. Ensure the ram is set to run at
    > 100%with the cpu's fsb, not 120%, 80%, or any of that asymmetrical junk!
    > Mine's been running here for 2-3 years. Best-running system I've ever
    > had.
    > BTW, I've bought 2 mobile 2500-Barton's on Ebay and they do fine on
    > other systems I have built for friends. Very little diff. in $ between
    > this cpu and the XP 2400's with unlocked mult--plus they don't have the
    > 512 L2 cache! HTH & good luck. s
    >
    Dodo, Oct 22, 2006
    #6
  7. Stefan Ulrich Fischer

    sdlomi2 Guest

    "Dodo" <donleo7(NOSPAM)@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:N4L_g.4972$...
    > nice set up! wish i could get one of those mobiles hehehe!

    <snip>
    If you're not afraid of Ebay, they are still available there. s
    sdlomi2, Oct 23, 2006
    #7
  8. Stefan Ulrich Fischer

    Kyle Guest

    "sdlomi2" <> wrote in message
    news:%c6%g.23314$...
    |
    | "Dodo" <donleo7(NOSPAM)@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    | news:N4L_g.4972$...
    | > nice set up! wish i could get one of those mobiles hehehe!
    | <snip>
    | If you're not afraid of Ebay, they are still available there. s
    |
    |

    FWIW, I've bought 2 mobile barton core CPUs off Ebay with great
    results (both will run 2300 MHz stable). However, one has to be
    careful which CPU is up for bid, some are not actually compatible with
    socket A mobos, I suggest searching the net for the actual CPU model
    number and it's capabilities/features/limitations before committing to
    a bid.
    --
    Best regards,
    Kyle
    Kyle, Oct 24, 2006
    #8
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Bob McSwain
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    402
  2. Ben
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    363
    DreamMaker
    Dec 16, 2003
  3. Bazis
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    338
    Gary Tait
    Jan 29, 2004
  4. Jeffrey Schwartz
    Replies:
    18
    Views:
    476
    Gordon Scott
    Jun 18, 2004
  5. Morgan's Grant
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    459
    Morgan's Grant
    Dec 22, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page