Asus CUV4X-C + Seagate 160GB

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Luke Skywalker, Dec 8, 2004.

  1. Hi

    I just bought a 160GB IDE Seagate Barracuda to connect to an
    older P3 with an Asus CUV4X-C motherboard, and the BIOS only reports
    8GB. FWIW, the BIOS was flashed to the latest version available
    (1007).

    Does someone know if those big drives we now have are reserved to more
    recent PCs?

    Thank you
    Luke.

    PS: Asus' www isn't working too well right now, hence my asking here :

    http://www.asus.com/support/errorpage/servererror.aspx?aspxerrorpath=/support/support.aspx

    Server Error in '/support' Application.

    ..Net ;-)
     
    Luke Skywalker, Dec 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Luke Skywalker

    Beemer Biker Guest

    "Luke Skywalker" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi
    >
    > I just bought a 160GB IDE Seagate Barracuda to connect to an
    > older P3 with an Asus CUV4X-C motherboard, and the BIOS only reports
    > 8GB. FWIW, the BIOS was flashed to the latest version available
    > (1007).
    >
    > Does someone know if those big drives we now have are reserved to more
    > recent PCs?
    >
    > Thank you
    > Luke.
    >
    > PS: Asus' www isn't working too well right now, hence my asking here :
    >
    >

    http://www.asus.com/support/errorpage/servererror.aspx?aspxerrorpath=/support/support.aspx
    >
    > Server Error in '/support' Application.
    >
    > .Net ;-)


    Possibly the beta bios handles it
    http://www.asus.com.tw/support/download/item.aspx?ModelName=CUV4X-C&Type=Latest
    i have a CUV4X-D and it handled a 250gb over USB. If running windows xp or
    2k be sure to enable 48bit addressing or you will corrupt the drive. I think
    RH9 linux also needs a kernel patch for 48bit addressing. You wont know for
    sure till you get past 128gb and files get corrupted. Search for "large
    drive enabler" or something like that at www.maxtor.com dont need to have a
    maxstor as the program just patches the registery.
     
    Beemer Biker, Dec 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 17:40:10 -0600, "Beemer Biker"
    <> wrote:
    >Possibly the beta bios handles it


    Thx a bunch. That did it.

    For those struggling with the same issue, here's the procedure:

    1. From Matrox's support section, download and run its "Big Drive
    Enabler" to prepare Windows to accept bigger drives (to enable 48bit
    addressing.) Reboot.

    2. Use FreeDOS to build yourself a basic bootable DOS floppy, ie. no
    memory manager like HIMEM.SYS or EMM386.SYS

    3. From Asus' site, download the latest BIOS for your motherboard,
    even if it's marked as Beta (I used 1008.003), along with the flasher
    utility AFLASH.EXE

    4. Connect the new drive to your PC, and boot with the floppy.

    5. Save the current BIOS to the floppy, and flash it with the new BIOS
    you downloaded. Reboot.

    6. Boot with your favorite disk imager. I used Drive Image 2002, but
    there are several alternatives.

    7. Copy the old disk onto the new one. If you have more than one
    partition, it's up to you if you wish to keep the same ratio or if you
    want to use some of the extra free space on the new disk for something
    else.

    8. Make sure that the boot partition on the new drive is marked as
    Active and is set as Master, unplug the old drive, and reboot.

    Done :)

    Thx again
    Luke.
     
    Luke Skywalker, Dec 9, 2004
    #3
  4. Luke Skywalker

    Paul Guest

    In article <>, Luke Skywalker
    <> wrote:

    > On Wed, 8 Dec 2004 17:40:10 -0600, "Beemer Biker"
    > <> wrote:
    > >Possibly the beta bios handles it

    >
    > Thx a bunch. That did it.
    >
    > For those struggling with the same issue, here's the procedure:
    >
    > 1. From Matrox's support section, download and run its "Big Drive
    > Enabler" to prepare Windows to accept bigger drives (to enable 48bit
    > addressing.) Reboot.
    >
    > 2. Use FreeDOS to build yourself a basic bootable DOS floppy, ie. no
    > memory manager like HIMEM.SYS or EMM386.SYS
    >
    > 3. From Asus' site, download the latest BIOS for your motherboard,
    > even if it's marked as Beta (I used 1008.003), along with the flasher
    > utility AFLASH.EXE
    >
    > 4. Connect the new drive to your PC, and boot with the floppy.
    >
    > 5. Save the current BIOS to the floppy, and flash it with the new BIOS
    > you downloaded. Reboot.
    >
    > 6. Boot with your favorite disk imager. I used Drive Image 2002, but
    > there are several alternatives.
    >
    > 7. Copy the old disk onto the new one. If you have more than one
    > partition, it's up to you if you wish to keep the same ratio or if you
    > want to use some of the extra free space on the new disk for something
    > else.
    >
    > 8. Make sure that the boot partition on the new drive is marked as
    > Active and is set as Master, unplug the old drive, and reboot.
    >
    > Done :)
    >
    > Thx again
    > Luke.


    Before filling the disk with valuable data, make sure that
    Windows truly is 48bit LBA ready. Find a 1GB sized test file,
    and duplicate it many times, until all partitions on the 160GB
    disk are full. I then use a checksum program (you could use
    md5sum, for example) and run it against all the copies of the
    same file, and verify they are the same.

    The problem you are testing for, is address rollover at the
    128GB mark. That is 128GB binary. If 48 bit addressing is
    not being used by either the OS or the hardware, then a
    write to 128GB + one sector, will actually write to sector
    zero. And writing near the origin of the disk, will trash
    the file system. That is what happens if your install is
    not done correctly.

    So, do some kind of test on the disk first, to make sure the
    disk is really ready for valuable files. Don't destroy your
    old disk image, until the new disk is verified.

    After doing the disk test, reboot the computer, and see if
    any partitions have disappeared.

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Dec 9, 2004
    #4
  5. On Thu, 09 Dec 2004 05:56:08 -0500, (Paul) wrote:
    >Before filling the disk with valuable data, make sure that
    >Windows truly is 48bit LBA ready.


    Thx a lot for the tip. This is pretty scary :-( Is there a utility
    from either MS, Asus, or Seagate that could perform this test instead
    of going through the procedure you gave?

    I'll google to understand why this is even a problem to begin with
    (too old motherboard?)

    Thx again
    Luke.
     
    Luke Skywalker, Dec 9, 2004
    #5
  6. Luke Skywalker

    Paul Guest

    In article <>, Luke Skywalker
    <> wrote:

    > On Thu, 09 Dec 2004 05:56:08 -0500, (Paul) wrote:
    > >Before filling the disk with valuable data, make sure that
    > >Windows truly is 48bit LBA ready.

    >
    > Thx a lot for the tip. This is pretty scary :-( Is there a utility
    > from either MS, Asus, or Seagate that could perform this test instead
    > of going through the procedure you gave?
    >
    > I'll google to understand why this is even a problem to begin with
    > (too old motherboard?)
    >
    > Thx again
    > Luke.


    It is the difference between 26 bit addressing mode and 48 bit
    addressing mode. Imagine an address that uses all 26 bits, like
    11 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111. Now, try to make that hardware
    write to one sector past that number (which would be the
    128GB location plus one sector). All the digits become zero,
    and the carry bit is dropped. The hardware gets
    00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000, and the first sector
    of the disk is now corrupted. If the path to the hardware
    only supports 26 of the sector address bits, then the "rollover"
    happens at the 128GB (binary) mark.

    That is how it happens.

    I have read one account of someone who used their large
    disk, and lost all their files about 3 months after they
    started using the disk. Based on the description of the
    symptoms, it would seem the user had just crossed the
    128GB mark.

    You could accelerate the test, by positioning a partition,
    so that the 128GB mark falls within a small partition.
    Filling that partition alone, will cross the 128GB mark,
    and reduce your test time. So, say you position a
    partition at 127GB (binary, mind you, be careful of
    the math) and the partition is 2GB long. Then, you
    would only have to copy 2GB worth of files, to test
    the crossing of the magic address.

    The way the disk drive manufacturers calculate gigabytes,
    the magic sector address works out to 137GB in decimal
    gigabytes (10**9 bytes = 1GB). If you count a gigabyte
    as 1024x1024x1024, then the magic mark becomes 128GB
    or 2**37 bytes. A sector contains 512 bytes or 2**11.
    2**37/2**11 = 2**26, the 26 bit sector address.

    Testing the whole disk is easier than figuring out
    how to set up the partitions :)

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Dec 9, 2004
    #6
  7. On Thu, 09 Dec 2004 08:29:52 -0500, (Paul) wrote:
    >Testing the whole disk is easier than figuring out
    >how to set up the partitions :)


    Thx again for the warning. I'll try to do this over the we and see how
    it goes.

    Luke.
     
    Luke Skywalker, Dec 9, 2004
    #7
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