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Can't slow down, any ideas?

Discussion in 'AMD Overclocking' started by Pete, Jun 16, 2006.

  1. Pete

    Pete Guest

    Hi All:

    I have an opty 150 that seems to be quite stable (24 h prime and completed a
    5 day calculation in MATLAB) at 256x11@1.55V on a DFI LP NF4 Ultra-D
    motherboard. The RAM/FSB is 1:1 so nothing tricky should be happening. I
    have 4 GB of dual channel OCZ gold xtc PC 4000 RAM with 2T, 3-3-4-8 timings.
    I have the RAM drive strength maxed out. OS is XP64. When I run memtest at
    these settings no errors. If I keep everything else constant and drop the
    multiplier down to 10, I get all kinds of memory errors in memtest. Any
    ideas of how going slower would decrease the stability, it seems to go
    against the central dogma of overclocking.

    TIA,

    Pete
    Pete, Jun 16, 2006
    #1
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  2. Pete

    Paul Guest

    In article <ERrkg.69350$>, "Pete"
    <> wrote:

    > Hi All:
    >
    > I have an opty 150 that seems to be quite stable (24 h prime and completed a
    > 5 day calculation in MATLAB) at 256x11@1.55V on a DFI LP NF4 Ultra-D
    > motherboard. The RAM/FSB is 1:1 so nothing tricky should be happening. I
    > have 4 GB of dual channel OCZ gold xtc PC 4000 RAM with 2T, 3-3-4-8 timings.
    > I have the RAM drive strength maxed out. OS is XP64. When I run memtest at
    > these settings no errors. If I keep everything else constant and drop the
    > multiplier down to 10, I get all kinds of memory errors in memtest. Any
    > ideas of how going slower would decrease the stability, it seems to go
    > against the central dogma of overclocking.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Pete


    Are you verifying with CPUZ, that when you change the multiplier,
    nothing else is changing ? Try verifying the settings in each case.
    (I.E. Never trust a BIOS further than you can throw it :))

    DFI is known to be tricky. I read one account about DFI BIOS, that
    suggested changing one setting, then save and test. Apparently, if
    you try to rush things, by just copying a script of settings into
    the BIOS setup screens, you'll never get the same results twice.
    With the DFI BIOS, you have to "sneak up" on your overclock.

    Paul
    Paul, Jun 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. Pete wrote:
    > Hi All:
    >
    > I have an opty 150 that seems to be quite stable (24 h prime and
    > completed a 5 day calculation in MATLAB) at 256x11@1.55V on a DFI LP
    > NF4 Ultra-D motherboard. The RAM/FSB is 1:1 so nothing tricky should
    > be happening. I have 4 GB of dual channel OCZ gold xtc PC 4000 RAM
    > with 2T, 3-3-4-8 timings. I have the RAM drive strength maxed out. OS
    > is XP64. When I run memtest at these settings no errors. If I keep
    > everything else constant and drop the multiplier down to 10, I get
    > all kinds of memory errors in memtest. Any ideas of how going slower
    > would decrease the stability, it seems to go against the central
    > dogma of overclocking.


    Reduce the drive strength to a point where it's stable again. More drive
    strength does not mean more stable, and it's possible that with the reduced
    power usage of the chip that the DRAM lines are being driven too hard and
    having errors from reflections or ground bounce.

    --
    Michael Brown
    Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz ---+--- My inbox is always open
    Michael Brown, Jun 16, 2006
    #3
  4. Pete

    user Guest

    Pete wrote:
    > Hi All:
    >
    > I have an opty 150 that seems to be quite stable (24 h prime and completed a
    > 5 day calculation in MATLAB) at 256x11@1.55V on a DFI LP NF4 Ultra-D
    > motherboard. The RAM/FSB is 1:1 so nothing tricky should be happening. I
    > have 4 GB of dual channel OCZ gold xtc PC 4000 RAM with 2T, 3-3-4-8 timings.
    > I have the RAM drive strength maxed out. OS is XP64. When I run memtest at
    > these settings no errors. If I keep everything else constant and drop the
    > multiplier down to 10, I get all kinds of memory errors in memtest. Any
    > ideas of how going slower would decrease the stability, it seems to go
    > against the central dogma of overclocking.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Pete
    >
    >

    the only memory who can handle it well is Buffalo memory, this memory
    can extend it self without causing any harm in the energy, OCZ it doesnt
    seem s to be the right product to compare it, its only a reputation of
    the name and anyone says (OCZ... OCZ) ... other will say who is this
    ocz... i prefer what i tested and what i know more on the product then
    the name... we test ocz they have a failure on following the rest of the
    resquest on board,

    you have to calculate the board energy and the speed it travel, the time
    that the energy fluid on board and the immensity of juice it takes to
    get to the memory and to calculate how much time the memory take to
    absorbe the energy before returning it. with all this will conclude that
    your power supply is one of the failling, second you need the cpu
    drivers, and a healty bios (Phoenix are 1 on market). your calculation
    on one field its no quite good.. i am not putting you down just
    correcting your theory and to search more...


    Overlocking its the same then taking speeds or cockaine, it will burn
    the coding inside the chip.


    Michael.g from Antiss
    Amd Solution provider and Dev software partner.
    user, Jun 16, 2006
    #4
  5. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "user" <> wrote in message
    news:aqGkg.18781$...
    > Pete wrote:
    >> Hi All:
    >>
    >> I have an opty 150 that seems to be quite stable (24 h prime and
    >> completed a 5 day calculation in MATLAB) at 256x11@1.55V on a DFI LP NF4
    >> Ultra-D motherboard. The RAM/FSB is 1:1 so nothing tricky should be
    >> happening. I have 4 GB of dual channel OCZ gold xtc PC 4000 RAM with 2T,
    >> 3-3-4-8 timings. I have the RAM drive strength maxed out. OS is XP64.
    >> When I run memtest at these settings no errors. If I keep everything
    >> else constant and drop the multiplier down to 10, I get all kinds of
    >> memory errors in memtest. Any ideas of how going slower would decrease
    >> the stability, it seems to go against the central dogma of overclocking.
    >>
    >> TIA,
    >>
    >> Pete

    > the only memory who can handle it well is Buffalo memory, this memory can
    > extend it self without causing any harm in the energy, OCZ it doesnt seem
    > s to be the right product to compare it, its only a reputation of the name
    > and anyone says (OCZ... OCZ) ... other will say who is this ocz... i
    > prefer what i tested and what i know more on the product then the name...
    > we test ocz they have a failure on following the rest of the resquest on
    > board,
    >
    > you have to calculate the board energy and the speed it travel, the time
    > that the energy fluid on board and the immensity of juice it takes to get
    > to the memory and to calculate how much time the memory take to absorbe
    > the energy before returning it. with all this will conclude that your
    > power supply is one of the failling, second you need the cpu drivers, and
    > a healty bios (Phoenix are 1 on market). your calculation on one field its
    > no quite good.. i am not putting you down just correcting your theory and
    > to search more...
    >
    >
    > Overlocking its the same then taking speeds or cockaine, it will burn the
    > coding inside the chip.
    >
    >
    > Michael.g from Antiss
    > Amd Solution provider and Dev software partner.


    Thanks for the info, I will look into it. I would not worry about burning
    the codiing in the chip, because I usually get bored with a chip and replace
    it before the chip fails. I have a drawer full of old but working chips.

    Best wishes,

    Pete
    Pete, Jun 17, 2006
    #5
  6. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Michael Brown" <> wrote in message
    news:4492896a$0$25130$...
    > Pete wrote:
    >> Hi All:
    >>
    >> I have an opty 150 that seems to be quite stable (24 h prime and
    >> completed a 5 day calculation in MATLAB) at 256x11@1.55V on a DFI LP
    >> NF4 Ultra-D motherboard. The RAM/FSB is 1:1 so nothing tricky should
    >> be happening. I have 4 GB of dual channel OCZ gold xtc PC 4000 RAM
    >> with 2T, 3-3-4-8 timings. I have the RAM drive strength maxed out. OS
    >> is XP64. When I run memtest at these settings no errors. If I keep
    >> everything else constant and drop the multiplier down to 10, I get
    >> all kinds of memory errors in memtest. Any ideas of how going slower
    >> would decrease the stability, it seems to go against the central
    >> dogma of overclocking.

    >
    > Reduce the drive strength to a point where it's stable again. More drive
    > strength does not mean more stable, and it's possible that with the
    > reduced power usage of the chip that the DRAM lines are being driven too
    > hard and having errors from reflections or ground bounce.
    >
    > --
    > Michael Brown
    > Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz ---+--- My inbox is always open

    I hate to mess around with RAM settings too much, but will test the effect
    of backing down on the drive strength.

    The RAM would not boot at 250 MHz when the drive strength was in the default
    or lowest setting. The system appears to be very stable with a multiplier
    of 11. Its just interesting that memtest is full of errors when the
    multiplier is backed down to 10. I am using the April 6, 2006 bios which
    hides many of the RAM settings behind auto. I agree that some of the RAM
    timings could be switching automatically, but keep in mind. The RAM/FSB is
    constant and 1:1. The FSB is at 250 MHz so changing the multiplier could
    change the RAM settings? Verifying in CPU-Z is a good suggestion.

    I might try a another modded bios, but last time I tried the ones on the
    boot CD, they all were less stable than the DFI bios.

    Best wishes,

    Pete
    Pete, Jun 17, 2006
    #6
  7. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:nospam-1606060424190001@192.168.1.178...
    > In article <ERrkg.69350$>, "Pete"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Hi All:
    >>
    >> I have an opty 150 that seems to be quite stable (24 h prime and
    >> completed a
    >> 5 day calculation in MATLAB) at 256x11@1.55V on a DFI LP NF4 Ultra-D
    >> motherboard. The RAM/FSB is 1:1 so nothing tricky should be happening.
    >> I
    >> have 4 GB of dual channel OCZ gold xtc PC 4000 RAM with 2T, 3-3-4-8
    >> timings.
    >> I have the RAM drive strength maxed out. OS is XP64. When I run memtest
    >> at
    >> these settings no errors. If I keep everything else constant and drop
    >> the
    >> multiplier down to 10, I get all kinds of memory errors in memtest. Any
    >> ideas of how going slower would decrease the stability, it seems to go
    >> against the central dogma of overclocking.
    >>
    >> TIA,
    >>
    >> Pete

    >
    > Are you verifying with CPUZ, that when you change the multiplier,
    > nothing else is changing ? Try verifying the settings in each case.
    > (I.E. Never trust a BIOS further than you can throw it :))
    >
    > DFI is known to be tricky. I read one account about DFI BIOS, that
    > suggested changing one setting, then save and test. Apparently, if
    > you try to rush things, by just copying a script of settings into
    > the BIOS setup screens, you'll never get the same results twice.
    > With the DFI BIOS, you have to "sneak up" on your overclock.
    >
    > Paul


    Good suggestion with CPU-Z. Is the reported RAM CPU-Z speed always
    accurate? In the OC guide on dfi-street, they give another algorithm using
    the ceiling function for calculating the RAM speed that usually gives a
    slower result than Memtest and CPU-Z.

    I have been sneaking up on my overclock for sometime. However, I wanted to
    backdown the multiplier for some tests when I uncovered this instability.
    Because slower means more stable, I was a bit confused. I actually did the
    tests several times, so I could believe in the results.

    I keep hoping that I will find the right combination to hit 3.0 GHz, but the
    system has been stable at 2.8 GHz with the wall at 2.85 GHz.
    When I have time, I will have to test out some of the recently modded
    bioses.

    Thanks for the input,

    Pete
    Pete, Jun 17, 2006
    #7
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