Changing AppleID on Transferred Machines

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Fred Moore, Aug 4, 2012.

  1. Fred Moore

    Fred Moore Guest

    I have next to no experience with the App Store (Mac or iOS). In
    preparation for setting up several new Macs and upgrading several
    existing Macs to 10.8, I need to better understand how the AppleID works
    in an *organization*.

    For 10.8, you must have an AppleID, right?, because it's used to
    register downloaded apps and upgrade system software. In an organization
    where different people may change jobs and move to or 'inherit'
    different computers, what's the best way to setup the AppleID **so it
    can be transferred to the new user** of a computer?

    When you set up an AppleID, you're asked for a name and email address.
    Should one enter something like 'Dept ABC Machine N' with
    ''? As long as the email address is valid, it
    should deliver email regardless of the name specified; and the email
    address can be changed when needed. The point is to NOT tie the computer
    and installation to a specific person, but a part of the organization.

    But what about an old machine with an existing AppleID that's been tied
    to a specific person? What's the best way to make that
    person-independent when upgrading to 10.8?

    Thanks for your input.
    Fred Moore, Aug 4, 2012
    #1
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  2. Fred Moore <> wrote:

    > I have next to no experience with the App Store (Mac or iOS). In
    > preparation for setting up several new Macs and upgrading several
    > existing Macs to 10.8, I need to better understand how the AppleID works
    > in an *organization*.
    >
    > For 10.8, you must have an AppleID, right?, because it's used to
    > register downloaded apps and upgrade system software. In an organization
    > where different people may change jobs and move to or 'inherit'
    > different computers, what's the best way to setup the AppleID **so it
    > can be transferred to the new user** of a computer?
    >
    > When you set up an AppleID, you're asked for a name and email address.
    > Should one enter something like 'Dept ABC Machine N' with
    > ''? As long as the email address is valid, it
    > should deliver email regardless of the name specified; and the email
    > address can be changed when needed. The point is to NOT tie the computer
    > and installation to a specific person, but a part of the organization.
    >
    > But what about an old machine with an existing AppleID that's been tied
    > to a specific person? What's the best way to make that
    > person-independent when upgrading to 10.8?


    From the Apple ID FAQ:

    "You shouldn't share your Apple ID account information with other
    people. Each person should have their own Apple ID."

    <http://support.apple.com/kb/HE37>

    To find out if organizations may have Apple IDs, contact support.

    <http://www.apple.com/support/appleid/contact/>

    My guess is they'll tell you that an Apple ID may not be used as a
    substitute for a site license.
    Neill Massello, Aug 4, 2012
    #2
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  3. Fred Moore

    Davoud Guest

    Neill Massello:
    > From the Apple ID FAQ:
    >
    > "You shouldn't share your Apple ID account information with other
    > people. Each person should have their own Apple ID."
    >
    > <http://support.apple.com/kb/HE37>


    Nonsense, Apple. You don't expect my wife and I to have different Apple
    IDs so that we have to buy each iOS app, each movie, each song twice.
    That's why you let us share content on five Macs with the same Apple
    ID, regardless of the administrator ID of the Mac user.

    > To find out if organizations may have Apple IDs, contact support.
    >
    > <http://www.apple.com/support/appleid/contact/>
    >
    > My guess is they'll tell you that an Apple ID may not be used as a
    > substitute for a site license.


    Except in the home, as noted above. And intended or not, it could work
    as a five-machine site license so long as the password was changed
    every time someone left the group.

    --
    I agree with almost everything that you have said and almost everything that
    you will say in your entire life.

    usenet *at* davidillig dawt cawm
    Davoud, Aug 4, 2012
    #3
  4. Fred Moore

    John Young Guest

    In article <040820121414528136%>, Davoud <>
    wrote:

    > Neill Massello:
    > > From the Apple ID FAQ:
    > >
    > > "You shouldn't share your Apple ID account information with other
    > > people. Each person should have their own Apple ID."
    > >
    > > <http://support.apple.com/kb/HE37>

    >
    > Nonsense, Apple. You don't expect my wife and I to have different Apple
    > IDs so that we have to buy each iOS app, each movie, each song twice.
    > That's why you let us share content on five Macs with the same Apple
    > ID, regardless of the administrator ID of the Mac user.

    My wife and I have separate Apple IDs. I have logged in with mine on
    her Mac Mini to install apps I have purchased, same with content. This
    has not caused a problem and when she logs back in the apps or content
    under my acc don't deactivate they work fine. YMMV. I don't know does
    this let us have a ten Mac Limit? I think not I think I can put my
    Apps/content on five machines. I don't know why we have separate Apple
    IDs just the way it happened. I love that the App store keeps a record
    of the Apps I have purchased so I can just reinstall them as needed by
    just signing in.
    John Young, Aug 4, 2012
    #4
  5. Fred Moore

    David Empson Guest

    John Young <> wrote:

    > In article <040820121414528136%>, Davoud <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > Neill Massello:
    > > > From the Apple ID FAQ:
    > > >
    > > > "You shouldn't share your Apple ID account information with other
    > > > people. Each person should have their own Apple ID."
    > > >
    > > > <http://support.apple.com/kb/HE37>

    > >
    > > Nonsense, Apple. You don't expect my wife and I to have different Apple
    > > IDs so that we have to buy each iOS app, each movie, each song twice.
    > > That's why you let us share content on five Macs with the same Apple
    > > ID, regardless of the administrator ID of the Mac user.

    > My wife and I have separate Apple IDs. I have logged in with mine on
    > her Mac Mini to install apps I have purchased, same with content. This
    > has not caused a problem and when she logs back in the apps or content
    > under my acc don't deactivate they work fine. YMMV. I don't know does
    > this let us have a ten Mac Limit?


    There is no such thing as a limit of five Macs for App Store purchases.

    For personal use, the licence agreement permits App Store purchases
    (including operating systems) to be used on every Mac you own or
    control. (For business use, there are two options: single installation
    on a computer shared by several people, or unlimited installation on
    computers used by a single person.)

    It is somewhat vague what Apple means in the case of a family, e.g.
    where the husband and wife each have their own computers, but in a legal
    sense they are most likely to be collectively owned, therefore it is
    valid to install apps on both which were purchased under a single Apple
    ID.

    There are technical reasons why it may be useful for two people in a
    family to each have their own Apple ID, e.g. iCloud sync if they don't
    want everything on their devices to be identical.

    --
    David Empson
    David Empson, Aug 5, 2012
    #5
  6. Fred Moore

    David Empson Guest

    Fred Moore <> wrote:

    > I have next to no experience with the App Store (Mac or iOS). In
    > preparation for setting up several new Macs and upgrading several
    > existing Macs to 10.8, I need to better understand how the AppleID works
    > in an *organization*.


    For a business, the licence agreement for the App Store permits apps
    obtained under a single Apple ID to be installed on either:

    - multiple computers used by a single person; or
    - a single computer used by multiple people.

    For small businesses this implies you need an Apple ID for each person,
    or an Apple ID for each computer. In either case you would need to make
    multiple purchases of the same app, one under each Apple ID.

    Purchasing an OS upgrade (Lion or Mountain Lion) works the same way.

    Apple has a volume licence programme, which starts at a minimum of 20
    seats. I haven't looked into the details but I expect this would be
    easier to manage than having 20 or more separate Apple IDs, purchases
    and downloads, and it might even be worth the cost of unused licences to
    save time for those who need to manage somewhat less than 20 seats.

    I expect the volume licence works on the basis that the organisation has
    a single Apple ID which is used on all computers.

    > For 10.8, you must have an AppleID, right?, because it's used to
    > register downloaded apps and upgrade system software.


    As far as I can tell, nothing has changed between Lion and Mountain Lion
    as far as the Apple ID is concerned, except that there is no option to
    purchase Mountain Lion on physical media. (The Lion USB thumb drive
    could be used without ever obtaining an Apple ID.)

    You need an Apple ID to get Mountain Lion from the App Store. You don't
    if Mountain Lion was obtained under a volume licence and is installed
    via NetInstall or other methods, or if it comes preinstalled on the
    computer (but a preinstalled system does need an Apple ID to re-download
    the OS and bundled apps).

    As far as I know, you don't need an Apple ID to get software updates,
    which are delivered via App Store but still using the same underlying
    mechanism as Software Update on earlier systems, which does not require
    signing in. The installed OS is not bound to a particular Apple ID.

    You do need to be signed in to App Store with an Apple ID to get
    application updates.

    > In an organization where different people may change jobs and move to or
    > 'inherit' different computers, what's the best way to setup the AppleID
    > **so it can be transferred to the new user** of a computer?


    Assuming you are using individual Apple IDs and not a volume licence,
    you have two choices:

    - Create an Apple ID for each computer, which stays with that computer
    (or moves to a replacement computer) no matter who is using it.

    - Create an Apple ID for each position in the organizaton, which is used
    by whoever currently has that position. If they use multple computers in
    their job (and those computers are not shared by other employees), the
    single Apple ID for the job can cover apps instaled on several
    computers.

    If the computers tend to move around, the second method will be messier
    because apps purchased by the old user will need to be deleted and
    reinstalled by the new user, or updates will get messy. The OS itself
    won't be a problem, as long as you have a suitable licence for that
    version of the OS for each employee.

    > When you set up an AppleID, you're asked for a name and email address.
    > Should one enter something like 'Dept ABC Machine N' with
    > ''? As long as the email address is valid, it
    > should deliver email regardless of the name specified; and the email
    > address can be changed when needed. The point is to NOT tie the computer
    > and installation to a specific person, but a part of the organization.


    The e-mail address is the Apple ID, and it has to be able to receive
    e-mail. It must also not be associated with another Apple ID. It can be
    changed, as long as the new e-mail address is not already in use as an
    Apple ID.

    Assuming you have sufficient flexibility with your own e-mail domain and
    servers, it would make most sense to create an e-mail account for each
    computer or position in the organisaton, which is perhaps only used for
    dealing with the Apple ID.

    This will be much easier if there is a volume licence agreement, as
    there will be a single Apple ID, and a single e-mail address, presumably
    managed by a single person.

    > But what about an old machine with an existing AppleID that's been tied
    > to a specific person? What's the best way to make that
    > person-independent when upgrading to 10.8?


    If the Apple ID has only been used for business purposes by that one
    person, then changing the Apple ID to a generic e-mail address might be
    a solution.

    If the Apple ID has been used for mixed business and personal use, you
    are probably screwed and would have to repurchase the business apps
    under a new Apple ID.

    --
    David Empson
    David Empson, Aug 5, 2012
    #6
  7. On 8/4/12 PDT 11:14 AM, Davoud wrote:
    > Neill Massello:
    >> From the Apple ID FAQ:
    >>
    >> "You shouldn't share your Apple ID account information with other
    >> people. Each person should have their own Apple ID."
    >>
    >> <http://support.apple.com/kb/HE37>

    >
    > Nonsense, Apple. You don't expect my wife and I to have different Apple
    > IDs so that we have to buy each iOS app, each movie, each song twice.
    > That's why you let us share content on five Macs with the same Apple
    > ID, regardless of the administrator ID of the Mac user.


    No, they don't expect that at all.
    John McWilliams, Aug 5, 2012
    #7
  8. Fred Moore

    Lewis Guest

    In message <040820121414528136%>
    Davoud <> wrote:
    > Neill Massello:
    >> From the Apple ID FAQ:
    >>
    >> "You shouldn't share your Apple ID account information with other
    >> people. Each person should have their own Apple ID."
    >>
    >> <http://support.apple.com/kb/HE37>


    > Nonsense, Apple. You don't expect my wife and I to have different Apple
    > IDs so that we have to buy each iOS app, each movie, each song twice.
    > That's why you let us share content on five Macs with the same Apple
    > ID, regardless of the administrator ID of the Mac user.


    You can install software you buy from the Mac App Store or the iOS app
    store on an unlimited number of devices.

    <http://www.apple.com/osx/apps/app-store.html>
    You can install apps on every Mac authorized for your personal use and
    even download them again. This is especially convenient when you buy a
    new Mac and want to load it with apps you already own.


    --
    Come on. Somewhere at the edge of the bell curve is the girl for me.
    Lewis, Aug 5, 2012
    #8
  9. Fred Moore

    John Young Guest

    In article <1kocsbg.1k91t6t1pkoxxxN%>,
    (David Empson) wrote:

    > John Young <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <040820121414528136%>, Davoud <>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > > Neill Massello:
    > > > > From the Apple ID FAQ:
    > > > >
    > > > > "You shouldn't share your Apple ID account information with other
    > > > > people. Each person should have their own Apple ID."
    > > > >
    > > > > <http://support.apple.com/kb/HE37>
    > > >
    > > > Nonsense, Apple. You don't expect my wife and I to have different Apple
    > > > IDs so that we have to buy each iOS app, each movie, each song twice.
    > > > That's why you let us share content on five Macs with the same Apple
    > > > ID, regardless of the administrator ID of the Mac user.

    > > My wife and I have separate Apple IDs. I have logged in with mine on
    > > her Mac Mini to install apps I have purchased, same with content. This
    > > has not caused a problem and when she logs back in the apps or content
    > > under my acc don't deactivate they work fine. YMMV. I don't know does
    > > this let us have a ten Mac Limit?

    >
    > There is no such thing as a limit of five Macs for App Store purchases.


    I guess thats for content not apps...again you are correct.
    How do you remember all this stuff or do you do a lot of looking up for
    you answers? I could never remember details the way you do!
    Thanks I like your answers because I can count on them being correct so
    don't have to double check anything.

    > For personal use, the licence agreement permits App Store purchases
    > (including operating systems) to be used on every Mac you own or
    > control. (For business use, there are two options: single installation
    > on a computer shared by several people, or unlimited installation on
    > computers used by a single person.)
    >
    > It is somewhat vague what Apple means in the case of a family, e.g.
    > where the husband and wife each have their own computers, but in a legal
    > sense they are most likely to be collectively owned, therefore it is
    > valid to install apps on both which were purchased under a single Apple
    > ID.
    >
    > There are technical reasons why it may be useful for two people in a
    > family to each have their own Apple ID, e.g. iCloud sync if they don't
    > want everything on their devices to be identical.


    Yes iCloud use is the best reason for my wife and myself to have
    separate Apple IDs. We both use iCloud so one ID would not work.
    John Young, Aug 5, 2012
    #9
  10. Fred Moore

    David Empson Guest

    John Young <> wrote:

    > In article <1kocsbg.1k91t6t1pkoxxxN%>,
    > (David Empson) wrote:
    >
    > > John Young <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <040820121414528136%>, Davoud <>
    > > > wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Neill Massello:
    > > > > > From the Apple ID FAQ:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > "You shouldn't share your Apple ID account information with other
    > > > > > people. Each person should have their own Apple ID."
    > > > > >
    > > > > > <http://support.apple.com/kb/HE37>
    > > > >
    > > > > Nonsense, Apple. You don't expect my wife and I to have different Apple
    > > > > IDs so that we have to buy each iOS app, each movie, each song twice.
    > > > > That's why you let us share content on five Macs with the same Apple
    > > > > ID, regardless of the administrator ID of the Mac user.
    > > > My wife and I have separate Apple IDs. I have logged in with mine on
    > > > her Mac Mini to install apps I have purchased, same with content. This
    > > > has not caused a problem and when she logs back in the apps or content
    > > > under my acc don't deactivate they work fine. YMMV. I don't know does
    > > > this let us have a ten Mac Limit?

    > >
    > > There is no such thing as a limit of five Macs for App Store purchases.

    >
    > I guess thats for content not apps...again you are correct.
    > How do you remember all this stuff or do you do a lot of looking up for
    > you answers?


    I have a good memory, especially of things I have read or discussed
    before. In some cases I need to look things up (especially to confirm
    details), but if I didn't know at all I usually wouldn't post an answer
    to a general question unless it particularly interested me, or was part
    of an ongoing discussion.

    Sometime my memory frightens me. For example, on Saturday I discovered
    that I had memorised the Apple document number which describes the
    printers supported by Snow Leopard and later. I didn't remember the full
    URL, but I was able to search for "HT3669" on someone else's computer
    and found the article faster than going and getting my computer to use
    the bookmark I had saved, or searching by description. I must have seen
    that page often enough to have remembered the code number.

    > I could never remember details the way you do!
    > Thanks I like your answers because I can count on them being correct so
    > don't have to double check anything.


    Thanks for the vote of confidence. I can't claim to be right all the
    time, but I often correct myself if I spot an important error or someone
    else raises it. I also try to point out when I'm speculating or unsure
    about something, or if I'm passing on details from something like a
    rumour.

    --
    David Empson
    David Empson, Aug 5, 2012
    #10
  11. Fred Moore

    Lewis Guest

    In message <-september.org>
    John Young <> wrote:
    > In article <1kocsbg.1k91t6t1pkoxxxN%>,
    > (David Empson) wrote:
    >> There is no such thing as a limit of five Macs for App Store purchases.


    > I guess thats for content not apps...


    That is only true for DRMed content (old music purchases, movies, and TV shows) and for iTunes Match.

    >> There are technical reasons why it may be useful for two people in a
    >> family to each have their own Apple ID, e.g. iCloud sync if they don't
    >> want everything on their devices to be identical.


    > Yes iCloud use is the best reason for my wife and myself to have
    > separate Apple IDs. We both use iCloud so one ID would not work.


    Works perfectly well.

    My wife and I have THREE icloud accounts.

    1) mine. All purchases are made on this account (because I am the one who first started buying apps content). All my contacts notes, calendar events, etc.

    2) hers. all her contacts, etc.

    3) ours. Shared contacts, shared calendars, shared notes, etc.

    On her iOS devices she uses my AppleID for the App Store.

    --
    The Force can have a strong influence on a weak mind.
    Lewis, Aug 6, 2012
    #11
  12. Fred Moore

    John Young Guest

    In article <>,
    Lewis <> wrote:

    > In message <-september.org>
    > John Young <> wrote:
    > > In article <1kocsbg.1k91t6t1pkoxxxN%>,
    > > (David Empson) wrote:
    > >> There is no such thing as a limit of five Macs for App Store purchases.

    >
    > > I guess thats for content not apps...

    >
    > That is only true for DRMed content (old music purchases, movies, and TV
    > shows) and for iTunes Match.
    >
    > >> There are technical reasons why it may be useful for two people in a
    > >> family to each have their own Apple ID, e.g. iCloud sync if they don't
    > >> want everything on their devices to be identical.

    >
    > > Yes iCloud use is the best reason for my wife and myself to have
    > > separate Apple IDs. We both use iCloud so one ID would not work.

    >
    > Works perfectly well.
    >
    > My wife and I have THREE icloud accounts.
    >
    > 1) mine. All purchases are made on this account (because I am the one who
    > first started buying apps content). All my contacts notes, calendar events,
    > etc.
    >
    > 2) hers. all her contacts, etc.
    >
    > 3) ours. Shared contacts, shared calendars, shared notes, etc.
    >
    > On her iOS devices she uses my AppleID for the App Store.


    Is a AppleID different then an iCloud acc? If so I never realized that.
    I and my wife log in with or AppleId for iCloud, AppStore, and iTunes
    Match. Good thing too since I don't have the memory of most on this
    group.
    John Young, Aug 6, 2012
    #12
  13. Fred Moore

    Lewis Guest

    In message <-september.org>
    John Young <> wrote:
    > Is a AppleID different then an iCloud acc?


    No.

    >If so I never realized that. I and my wife log in with or AppleId for
    >iCloud, AppStore, and iTunes Match. Good thing too since I don't have
    >the memory of most on this group.


    I find it necessary to keep my contacts out of her address book and her
    contacts out of mine, so we use the third account to store all the
    shared contacts (family, mutual friends, house related businesses, etc).

    Likewise, if I schedule lunch with someone, it doesn't need to be on
    her calendars, and if she has a meeting, I don't need to see that, but
    there are obviously often events that apply to both of us.

    --
    And there were all the stars, looking remarkably like powered diamonds
    spilled on black velvet, the stars that lured and ultimately called the
    boldest towards them...
    Lewis, Aug 6, 2012
    #13
  14. Fred Moore

    John Young Guest

    In article <>,
    Lewis <> wrote:

    > In message <-september.org>
    > John Young <> wrote:
    > > Is a AppleID different then an iCloud acc?

    >
    > No.
    >
    > >If so I never realized that. I and my wife log in with or AppleId for
    > >iCloud, AppStore, and iTunes Match. Good thing too since I don't have
    > >the memory of most on this group.

    >
    > I find it necessary to keep my contacts out of her address book and her
    > contacts out of mine, so we use the third account to store all the
    > shared contacts (family, mutual friends, house related businesses, etc).
    >
    > Likewise, if I schedule lunch with someone, it doesn't need to be on
    > her calendars, and if she has a meeting, I don't need to see that, but
    > there are obviously often events that apply to both of us.


    Thanks Lewis
    John Young, Aug 6, 2012
    #14
  15. Fred Moore

    Fred Moore Guest

    In article <>,
    Lewis <> wrote:

    > In message <-september.org>
    > John Young <> wrote:
    > > In article <1kocsbg.1k91t6t1pkoxxxN%>,
    > > (David Empson) wrote:
    > >> There is no such thing as a limit of five Macs for App Store purchases.

    >
    > > I guess thats for content not apps...

    >
    > That is only true for DRMed content (old music purchases, movies, and TV
    > shows) and for iTunes Match.
    >
    > >> There are technical reasons why it may be useful for two people in a
    > >> family to each have their own Apple ID, e.g. iCloud sync if they don't
    > >> want everything on their devices to be identical.

    >
    > > Yes iCloud use is the best reason for my wife and myself to have
    > > separate Apple IDs. We both use iCloud so one ID would not work.

    >
    > Works perfectly well.
    >
    > My wife and I have THREE icloud accounts.
    >
    > 1) mine. All purchases are made on this account (because I am the one who
    > first started buying apps content). All my contacts notes, calendar events,
    > etc.
    >
    > 2) hers. all her contacts, etc.
    >
    > 3) ours. Shared contacts, shared calendars, shared notes, etc.
    >
    > On her iOS devices she uses my AppleID for the App Store.


    Lewis, in order to make this work, do you need 3 accounts if you have
    one computer? I'd think everything would get completely confused using
    one account on one computer and multiple iCloud account/iDevices.

    --
    Inquiring minds want to know!
    Fred Moore, Aug 6, 2012
    #15
  16. Fred Moore

    Fred Moore Guest

    Thanks to all who replied, including Neill who posted the links to Apple
    about the ID.

    In article <1kocsk2.yji1wadip6h5N%>,
    (David Empson) wrote:

    [lots of informative stuff, as usual, as well as this tip:]

    > Assuming you are using individual Apple IDs and not a volume licence,
    > you have two choices:
    >
    > - Create an Apple ID for each computer, which stays with that computer
    > (or moves to a replacement computer) no matter who is using it.
    >
    > - Create an Apple ID for each position in the organizaton, which is used
    > by whoever currently has that position. If they use multple computers in
    > their job (and those computers are not shared by other employees), the
    > single Apple ID for the job can cover apps instaled on several
    > computers.
    >
    > If the computers tend to move around, the second method will be messier
    > because apps purchased by the old user will need to be deleted and
    > reinstalled by the new user, or updates will get messy. The OS itself
    > won't be a problem, as long as you have a suitable licence for that
    > version of the OS for each employee.

    ....
    > The e-mail address is the Apple ID, and it has to be able to receive
    > e-mail. It must also not be associated with another Apple ID. It can be
    > changed, as long as the new e-mail address is not already in use as an
    > Apple ID.
    >
    > Assuming you have sufficient flexibility with your own e-mail domain and
    > servers, it would make most sense to create an e-mail account for each
    > computer or position in the organisaton, which is perhaps only used for
    > dealing with the Apple ID.


    In all cases that I'm dealing with, the computer is the person and the
    person is the computer (small offices).
    (All together now: Ohhhhmmmmmmm.... ;) )

    Let me go back slightly. After reading though the links Neill posted, it
    seems that when one creates an Apple ID (and, yes, there is officially a
    space in there contrary to how I wrote it), you give a name, an email
    address (which is 'officially' the Apple ID), and a password.

    HOWEVER, you can later on change ANY of these, including the email
    address. So Apple must be creating some hidden unique user ID behind the
    scenes, right? So it appears this Apple ID thing is much more wide open
    than I originally thought, except you can't merge them.

    Anyway, here's what seems the best idea for my circumstances. Your
    comments, please.

    - Create a name for the machine/person because one person works on one
    machine in all instances, some thing like Graphic Workstation 1, The
    Organization.

    - Create a special email address such as .
    (This isn't strictly necessary, but all the outfits I'm dealing with
    have the ability to do this.) Direct any email from Apple related to the
    ID to either the the appropriate IT person or the accounting dept with a
    copy to the user. Purchase confirmations shouldn't go only to the users
    for fear of unauthorized purchases.

    - If the person or the computer changes, the Apple ID stays the same for
    the position.

    I could use a real IT or accounting email address and change it when a
    new person assumes the job. Being able to change all three entries in an
    Apple ID is a flexibility I hadn't expected.

    > This will be much easier if there is a volume license agreement, as
    > there will be a single Apple ID, and a single e-mail address, presumably
    > managed by a single person.


    I haven't contemplated volume licenses since none of these folks have
    enough machines under the same OS version to qualify. It's 20 isn't it?

    Thanks again for the help.

    --
    And It's Just That Easy
    Fred Moore, Aug 6, 2012
    #16
  17. Fred Moore

    Lewis Guest

    In message <-september.org>
    Fred Moore <> wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Lewis <> wrote:


    >> In message <-september.org>
    >> John Young <> wrote:
    >> > In article <1kocsbg.1k91t6t1pkoxxxN%>,
    >> > (David Empson) wrote:
    >> >> There is no such thing as a limit of five Macs for App Store purchases.

    >>
    >> > I guess thats for content not apps...

    >>
    >> That is only true for DRMed content (old music purchases, movies, and TV
    >> shows) and for iTunes Match.
    >>
    >> >> There are technical reasons why it may be useful for two people in a
    >> >> family to each have their own Apple ID, e.g. iCloud sync if they don't
    >> >> want everything on their devices to be identical.

    >>
    >> > Yes iCloud use is the best reason for my wife and myself to have
    >> > separate Apple IDs. We both use iCloud so one ID would not work.

    >>
    >> Works perfectly well.
    >>
    >> My wife and I have THREE icloud accounts.
    >>
    >> 1) mine. All purchases are made on this account (because I am the one who
    >> first started buying apps content). All my contacts notes, calendar events,
    >> etc.
    >>
    >> 2) hers. all her contacts, etc.
    >>
    >> 3) ours. Shared contacts, shared calendars, shared notes, etc.
    >>
    >> On her iOS devices she uses my AppleID for the App Store.


    > Lewis, in order to make this work, do you need 3 accounts if you have
    > one computer?


    My account ont the computer has my Apple ID and then the additional
    shared apple id. Her account has her apple id and the shared apple id.

    > I'd think everything would get completely confused using
    > one account on one computer and multiple iCloud account/iDevices.


    Why would anyone ever use one account for multiple people? That way
    madness lies.

    *NEVER* do this. Everyone has their own accounts on the computers. Even
    houseguests we expect to see more than once get their own accounts.

    --
    Power corrupts. Absolute power is kind of neat.
    Lewis, Aug 6, 2012
    #17
  18. Fred Moore

    Wes Groleau Guest

    On 08-06-2012 17:49, Lewis wrote:
    > In message <-september.org>
    > Fred Moore <> wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> Lewis <> wrote:
    >>> In message <-september.org>
    >>> John Young <> wrote:


    >>>> Yes iCloud use is the best reason for my wife and myself to have
    >>>> separate Apple IDs. We both use iCloud so one ID would not work.
    >>>
    >>> Works perfectly well.
    >>>
    >>> My wife and I have THREE icloud accounts.



    > Why would anyone ever use one account for multiple people? That way
    > madness lies.
    >
    > *NEVER* do this. Everyone has their own accounts on the computers. Even
    > houseguests we expect to see more than once get their own accounts.


    See the contradiction?

    --
    Wes Groleau

    “Two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity.
    But I'm not so sure about the universe.â€
    — Albert Einstein
    Wes Groleau, Aug 7, 2012
    #18
  19. Fred Moore

    Lewis Guest

    In message <jvpj5p$kf1$>
    Wes Groleau <> wrote:
    > On 08-06-2012 17:49, Lewis wrote:
    >> In message <-september.org>
    >> Fred Moore <> wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Lewis <> wrote:
    >>>> In message <-september.org>
    >>>> John Young <> wrote:


    >>>>> Yes iCloud use is the best reason for my wife and myself to have
    >>>>> separate Apple IDs. We both use iCloud so one ID would not work.
    >>>>
    >>>> Works perfectly well.
    >>>>
    >>>> My wife and I have THREE icloud accounts.


    >> Why would anyone ever use one account for multiple people? That way
    >> madness lies.
    >>
    >> *NEVER* do this. Everyone has their own accounts on the computers. Even
    >> houseguests we expect to see more than once get their own accounts.


    > See the contradiction?


    No, I don't.

    --
    'The gods,' he said. 'Imprisoned in a thought. And perhaps they were
    never more than a dream.' --Sourcery
    Lewis, Aug 7, 2012
    #19
  20. Fred Moore

    Fred Moore Guest

    In article <>,
    Lewis <> wrote:

    > In message <-september.org>
    > Fred Moore <> wrote:
    >
    > > Lewis, in order to make this work, do you need 3 accounts if you have
    > > one computer?

    >
    > My account ont the computer has my Apple ID and then the additional
    > shared apple id. Her account has her apple id and the shared apple id.
    >
    > > I'd think everything would get completely confused using
    > > one account on one computer and multiple iCloud account/iDevices.

    >
    > Why would anyone ever use one account for multiple people? That way
    > madness lies.


    One account is much easier to administer and share music/photos. You
    don't have to go through the hassle of storing stuff in shared and
    changing perms. If there's an easier way, please enlighten me.
    Fred Moore, Aug 7, 2012
    #20
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