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Complete Newbie

Discussion in 'AMD Overclocking' started by PAUL, Jul 20, 2004.

  1. PAUL

    PAUL Guest

    Sorry but everyone has to start somewhere :-(
    I'm interested in the possibilities of overclocking an AMD XP2800+ (barton
    core) cpu on a SOYO KT600 M/B, also a Radeon 9600 256mb. Could someone
    please point me in the direction of a reliable and reasonably easy to
    understand website so i can gain more basic knowledge rather than pester you
    all with generalised questions that a bit of reading would solve, many
    thanks Paul
     
    PAUL, Jul 20, 2004
    #1
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  2. PAUL

    Wes Newell Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 20:43:18 +0100, PAUL wrote:

    > Sorry but everyone has to start somewhere :-(
    > I'm interested in the possibilities of overclocking an AMD XP2800+ (barton
    > core) cpu on a SOYO KT600 M/B, also a Radeon 9600 256mb. Could someone
    > please point me in the direction of a reliable and reasonably easy to
    > understand website so i can gain more basic knowledge rather than pester you
    > all with generalised questions that a bit of reading would solve, many
    > thanks Paul


    I'm sure there's websites out there, but I've never looked for them.The
    cpu core speed setting is controlled by only 2 things. It's real simple in
    basic form. Multiplier times FSB = cpu speed. That's it in a nutshell. if
    your cpu isn't multiplier locked (newer ones are, a whole nother story)
    then just raise the multiplier in the bios, jumper, or by whatever means
    your MB supports. If it doesn't have this feature, use the pinmod, mod the
    multiplier on the cpu, or whatever other way out of many you want to use.
    The 2800+ barton default multiplier is 12.5 x 166.67Mhz FSB for a default
    speed of 2083MHz.. Youi could also raise the FSB, but be aware that
    changing the multipler affects only the cpu speed, while changing the FSB
    will affect your other bus speeds. Even lowering it to run slower may
    screw the other buses up enough where it won't boot. This depends on many
    factors and I'm not even going to get into that. If you want to try
    raising the FSB speed, do it in small steps of 2-5. Note that you also may
    need to raise vcore from the default 1.65v to get it to run faster. A
    short things affected by FSB changes are, ram, all PCI devices, and AGP
    ports.

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
     
    Wes Newell, Jul 20, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 20:43:18 +0100, PAUL wrote:
    >
    > > Sorry but everyone has to start somewhere :-(
    > > I'm interested in the possibilities of overclocking an AMD XP2800+

    (barton
    > > core) cpu on a SOYO KT600 M/B, also a Radeon 9600 256mb. Could someone
    > > please point me in the direction of a reliable and reasonably easy to
    > > understand website so i can gain more basic knowledge rather than pester

    you
    > > all with generalised questions that a bit of reading would solve, many
    > > thanks Paul

    >
    > I'm sure there's websites out there, but I've never looked for them.The
    > cpu core speed setting is controlled by only 2 things. It's real simple in
    > basic form. Multiplier times FSB = cpu speed. That's it in a nutshell. if
    > your cpu isn't multiplier locked (newer ones are, a whole nother story)
    > then just raise the multiplier in the bios, jumper, or by whatever means
    > your MB supports. If it doesn't have this feature, use the pinmod, mod the
    > multiplier on the cpu, or whatever other way out of many you want to use.
    > The 2800+ barton default multiplier is 12.5 x 166.67Mhz FSB for a default
    > speed of 2083MHz.. Youi could also raise the FSB, but be aware that
    > changing the multipler affects only the cpu speed, while changing the FSB
    > will affect your other bus speeds. Even lowering it to run slower may
    > screw the other buses up enough where it won't boot. This depends on many
    > factors and I'm not even going to get into that. If you want to try
    > raising the FSB speed, do it in small steps of 2-5. Note that you also may
    > need to raise vcore from the default 1.65v to get it to run faster. A
    > short things affected by FSB changes are, ram, all PCI devices, and AGP
    > ports.


    Hm, I just looked into to it, and if you can change the agp volts, I'm
    guessing
    you can also lock the pci/agp to 33/66 as well.
    Just set this to 33/66 if needed, some boards will turn this up with cpu fsb
    unless you set it, then it stays where you set it.
    My Asus A7N8X is set this way, I do get a little better performance doing
    a small overclock to pci/agp, but @ about 1-5% is not enough that I care.
    And by the way, which DRAGON MB do you have?
    From the way it seems looking @ them, you can lock down
    the agp/pci to 66/33 on almost all of them.
    For me though, I would rather get Asus or "Gigabyte with (Dual Bios)
    Denny. :)

    > --
    > Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    > http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
     
    Dennis E Strausser Jr, Jul 21, 2004
    #3
  4. PAUL

    PAUL Guest

    Many thanks yes the cpu is locked (well at the moment), the board is the
    KT600 dragon ultra looking in the bios settings it appears to allow me to
    lock the pci/agp (by SPD?) or alter them accordingly. It also seems to give
    me the facility to change several voltage settings i'm just reluctant to
    start altering them before i know exactly what they do.
    Which software would be generally regarded as the best way to benchmark it
    so that i can compare improvement against risk?
    Paul

    "Dennis E Strausser Jr" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    > > On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 20:43:18 +0100, PAUL wrote:
    > >

    > Hm, I just looked into to it, and if you can change the agp volts, I'm
    > guessing
    > you can also lock the pci/agp to 33/66 as well.
    > Just set this to 33/66 if needed, some boards will turn this up with cpu

    fsb
    > unless you set it, then it stays where you set it.
    > My Asus A7N8X is set this way, I do get a little better performance

    doing
    > a small overclock to pci/agp, but @ about 1-5% is not enough that I care.
    > And by the way, which DRAGON MB do you have?
    > From the way it seems looking @ them, you can lock down
    > the agp/pci to 66/33 on almost all of them.
    > For me though, I would rather get Asus or "Gigabyte with (Dual Bios)
    > Denny. :)
    >
     
    PAUL, Jul 21, 2004
    #4
  5. PAUL

    Wes Newell Guest

    On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 03:25:11 +0100, PAUL wrote:

    > Many thanks yes the cpu is locked (well at the moment), the board is the
    > KT600 dragon ultra looking in the bios settings it appears to allow me to
    > lock the pci/agp (by SPD?) or alter them accordingly. It also seems to give
    > me the facility to change several voltage settings i'm just reluctant to
    > start altering them before i know exactly what they do.


    I'd be very careful if I were you. The KT600 chipset doesn't have a PCI
    lock, so unless Soyo has found an external way to do this, the PCI bus
    won't lock. There is no "by SPD" associated with the pci bus. That's a
    term used for the ram bus where the manufacturer speed settings are read
    from rom on the ram board and sets the ram bus accordingly. As for
    altering voltages, well, that depnds on where they are now. you might do
    damage to the ram if you go over 2.6/2.7v. Raising vcore shouldn't damage
    anything unless you raise it so much the cpu starts getting too hot.

    > Which software would be generally regarded as the best way to benchmark
    > it so that i can compare improvement against risk? Paul
    >

    Don't worry about benchmarks. Make sure your system is stable after
    overclocking it. I'd start with memtest booted from floppy or cd before I
    hooked my HD back up (which you should disconnect while overclocking to be
    on the safe side). Then if it test ok, run prime95. Watch your cpu temps.

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
     
    Wes Newell, Jul 21, 2004
    #5
  6. "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 03:25:11 +0100, PAUL wrote:
    >
    > > Many thanks yes the cpu is locked (well at the moment), the board is the
    > > KT600 dragon ultra looking in the bios settings it appears to allow me

    to
    > > lock the pci/agp (by SPD?) or alter them accordingly. It also seems to

    give
    > > me the facility to change several voltage settings i'm just reluctant to
    > > start altering them before i know exactly what they do.

    >
    > I'd be very careful if I were you. The KT600 chipset doesn't have a PCI
    > lock, so unless Soyo has found an external way to do this, the PCI bus
    > won't lock. There is no "by SPD" associated with the pci bus. That's a
    > term used for the ram bus where the manufacturer speed settings are read
    > from rom on the ram board and sets the ram bus accordingly. As for
    > altering voltages, well, that depnds on where they are now. you might do
    > damage to the ram if you go over 2.6/2.7v. Raising vcore shouldn't damage
    > anything unless you raise it so much the cpu starts getting too hot.
    >
    > > Which software would be generally regarded as the best way to benchmark
    > > it so that i can compare improvement against risk? Paul
    > >

    > Don't worry about benchmarks. Make sure your system is stable after
    > overclocking it. I'd start with memtest booted from floppy or cd before I
    > hooked my HD back up (which you should disconnect while overclocking to be
    > on the safe side). Then if it test ok, run prime95. Watch your cpu temps.
    >
    > --
    > Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    > http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm

    Hm, I don't know Wes.
    I do know what some of the letters stand for in the name.
    D. stands for Daul Channel Memory
    R. I'm not sure.
    A. Ac 97 Audio
    G. I'm not sure on this one either.
    O. Over Clocking
    N. I'm not sure what this stands for either.

    One thing I do know about the SOYO is it's supposed to be the best
    or one of the best for overclocknig.
    I have a Asus A7N8X board, I can set the multiplier .5 over default to 14
    on my 2200+ but I find I get a better Overclock on or near stock
    Multiplier.
    If it is true that you can set your agp to 66, I would do it if I were you.
    Don't set it to auto. Or that will be turned up as you turn up fsb.
    The memory settings, it's good to let this one go up, if your memory
    will take it.
    As "Wes" with the KT600 said though, unless SOYO unlocked this, you cant set
    the agp to 66.
    Only reason I would think you can, is if you can change your agp voltage,
    I would think
    you can change it's bus as well.

    Voltages, don't let it scare you.
    Only set this up .1 at a time for both ram and cpu, most times you will only
    need.
    1.7 or 1.8 vcore hm, I don't remember stock for AMD cpu's.
    + by .1 - .2 2.6 or 2.7 for ram, I've had my ram running 2.8 already.
    but it didn't help much.
    I hope this helps you..
    Denny. :)
     
    Dennis E Strausser Jr, Jul 21, 2004
    #6
  7. PAUL

    Wes Newell Guest

    On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 15:59:41 -0400, Dennis E Strausser Jr wrote:

    > Hm, I don't know Wes.


    I do, that's why I'm here.:)

    > I do know what some of the letters stand for in the name.
    > D. stands for Daul Channel Memory
    > R. I'm not sure.
    > A. Ac 97 Audio
    > G. I'm not sure on this one either.
    > O. Over Clocking
    > N. I'm not sure what this stands for either.
    >

    You've confused the board name with features. The D doesn't stand for dual
    channel memory because that's impossible with the KT600 chipset. And even
    though A seems to fit AC97, that's just a coincidence. Same for the O.:)
    Dragon is just a name. It has nothing to do with the features os the
    board. Soyo has used the Dragon name for quite a few boards going back at
    least as far as the KT266A chipset for AMD, and I don't know when they
    started using it for the P4 boards, but they do. It's just a marketing
    name.:)

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
     
    Wes Newell, Jul 22, 2004
    #7
  8. PAUL

    PAUL Guest

    This is from the soyo website:
    D
    Based on the latest memory technology, Double Data Rate (DDR) SDRAM offers
    improved memory clock speed at 200/266/333/400 MHz
    R
    Built-in RAID technology provides IDE RAID 0,1 / 0+1 function for superior
    storage performance while offering improved availability and reliability of
    the information on disk
    A
    Experience surround sound with 4/6-channel hardware audio. Extended bracket
    provides SPDIF optical and coaxial output for optimal digital sound
    experience.
    G
    Universal AGP Pro offers high performance graphics capability ideal for 3D
    mode
    O
    Overclocking friendly. With the help of SOYO Wizard On Hand, users can
    improve system speed and performance by increasing BIOS setting in 1 MHz
    increment. Hardware enthusiasts' favorite!
    N
    Built-in network 10/100 Ethernet that transmits information between
    computers at speeds of 10 and 100 million bits per second (Mbps).
    2
    800Mhz FSB/Dual DDR/IEEE 1394 Firewire on board/Serial ATA/RAID

    many thanks, successfully managed to start uping fsb system still stable and
    temps only up 1degree (if that) so will continue a bit more will post
    details if any use to anyone when i've got to what i think is a stable but
    improved mark

    "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Wed, 21 Jul 2004 15:59:41 -0400, Dennis E Strausser Jr wrote:
    >
    > > Hm, I don't know Wes.

    >
    > I do, that's why I'm here.:)
    >
    > > I do know what some of the letters stand for in the name.
    > > D. stands for Daul Channel Memory
    > > R. I'm not sure.
    > > A. Ac 97 Audio
    > > G. I'm not sure on this one either.
    > > O. Over Clocking
    > > N. I'm not sure what this stands for either.
    > >

    > You've confused the board name with features. The D doesn't stand for dual
    > channel memory because that's impossible with the KT600 chipset. And even
    > though A seems to fit AC97, that's just a coincidence. Same for the O.:)
    > Dragon is just a name. It has nothing to do with the features os the
    > board. Soyo has used the Dragon name for quite a few boards going back at
    > least as far as the KT266A chipset for AMD, and I don't know when they
    > started using it for the P4 boards, but they do. It's just a marketing
    > name.:)
    >
    > --
    > Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    > http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
     
    PAUL, Jul 23, 2004
    #8
  9. PAUL

    Wes Newell Guest

    On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 06:44:49 +0100, PAUL wrote:

    > This is from the soyo website:
    > D
    > Based on the latest memory technology, Double Data Rate (DDR) SDRAM offers
    > improved memory clock speed at 200/266/333/400 MHz


    In the first place, this isn't the same as dual channel, and in the second
    place, this is still not right because the KT266A chipset Dragon model
    maximum ram clock speed is 133MHz. And since they put clock speed for
    200/266/333/400 MHz. the whole f*cking thing is wrong as it will only
    support a clock speed of 200Mhz. That's the clock speed of the ram bus on
    PC3200 ram. Someone must have just dreamed this crap up.

    > R
    > Built-in RAID technology provides IDE RAID 0,1 / 0+1 function for superior
    > storage performance while offering improved availability and reliability of
    > the information on disk


    If all Dragon boards have buitl in raid I could buy this.

    > A
    > Experience surround sound with 4/6-channel hardware audio. Extended bracket
    > provides SPDIF optical and coaxial output for optimal digital sound
    > experience.


    Give me a break.:)

    > G
    > Universal AGP Pro offers high performance graphics capability ideal for 3D
    > mode


    Well, here we come to maybe another error. The earlier dragon boards
    didn't have AGP Pro I don't believe.

    > O
    > Overclocking friendly. With the help of SOYO Wizard On Hand, users can
    > improve system speed and performance by increasing BIOS setting in 1 MHz
    > increment. Hardware enthusiasts' favorite!


    Wow, like almost every other socket a board made won't do this too.:)

    > N
    > Built-in network 10/100 Ethernet that transmits information between
    > computers at speeds of 10 and 100 million bits per second (Mbps).


    Ditto as above.

    > 2
    > 800Mhz FSB/Dual DDR/IEEE 1394 Firewire on board/Serial ATA/RAID
    >

    I hope you really don't believe this 800MHz FSB crap, cause that's what it
    is.:)

    > many thanks, successfully managed to start uping fsb system still stable
    > and temps only up 1degree (if that) so will continue a bit more will
    > post details if any use to anyone when i've got to what i think is a
    > stable but improved mark
    >

    Glad you got a handle on it. Just don't believe all you read from any
    board maker.:)

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
     
    Wes Newell, Jul 23, 2004
    #9
  10. "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 06:44:49 +0100, PAUL wrote:
    >
    > > This is from the soyo website:
    > > D
    > > Based on the latest memory technology, Double Data Rate (DDR) SDRAM

    offers
    > > improved memory clock speed at 200/266/333/400 MHz

    >
    > In the first place, this isn't the same as dual channel, and in the second
    > place, this is still not right because the KT266A chipset Dragon model
    > maximum ram clock speed is 133MHz. And since they put clock speed for
    > 200/266/333/400 MHz. the whole f*cking thing is wrong as it will only
    > support a clock speed of 200Mhz. That's the clock speed of the ram bus on
    > PC3200 ram. Someone must have just dreamed this crap up.


    It is right really, 200/2 = 100
    266/2 = 133
    333/2 = 166 (166.5)
    & 400 is 200
    200/266/333 and 400 is the full bus.
    The new ones are 400 mhz FSB or 800 bus.
    This is supposed to go up again soon, as AMD is finding new ways
    to turn up the speed of their CPU's
    Their new one's are either 3.2 or 3.4 GHz @ stock.
    I think it's called FX58 but don't (") me on it.
    Me thinks Intel is going to be shi*ing them selfs right about now.
    They messed up real bad this time not letting (lga) be all that user
    friendly.
    All of this is still not all that confusing.
    Like,,,,.....
    100 x 4
    133.25 x 4
    200 x 4
    ""Quad Pumped,, new tech, ha ha ha..""
    But it still can only (just) get by an FX53
    And cant beat it when it comes to,, hmmmm.... 64Bit?!

    Denny. :)

    > > R
    > > Built-in RAID technology provides IDE RAID 0,1 / 0+1 function for

    superior
    > > storage performance while offering improved availability and reliability

    of
    > > the information on disk

    >
    > If all Dragon boards have buitl in raid I could buy this.
    >
    > > A
    > > Experience surround sound with 4/6-channel hardware audio. Extended

    bracket
    > > provides SPDIF optical and coaxial output for optimal digital sound
    > > experience.

    >
    > Give me a break.:)
    >
    > > G
    > > Universal AGP Pro offers high performance graphics capability ideal for

    3D
    > > mode

    >
    > Well, here we come to maybe another error. The earlier dragon boards
    > didn't have AGP Pro I don't believe.
    >
    > > O
    > > Overclocking friendly. With the help of SOYO Wizard On Hand, users can
    > > improve system speed and performance by increasing BIOS setting in 1 MHz
    > > increment. Hardware enthusiasts' favorite!

    >
    > Wow, like almost every other socket a board made won't do this too.:)
    >
    > > N
    > > Built-in network 10/100 Ethernet that transmits information between
    > > computers at speeds of 10 and 100 million bits per second (Mbps).

    >
    > Ditto as above.
    >
    > > 2
    > > 800Mhz FSB/Dual DDR/IEEE 1394 Firewire on board/Serial ATA/RAID
    > >

    > I hope you really don't believe this 800MHz FSB crap, cause that's what it
    > is.:)
    >
    > > many thanks, successfully managed to start uping fsb system still stable
    > > and temps only up 1degree (if that) so will continue a bit more will
    > > post details if any use to anyone when i've got to what i think is a
    > > stable but improved mark
    > >

    > Glad you got a handle on it. Just don't believe all you read from any
    > board maker.:)
    >
    > --
    > Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    > http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
     
    Dennis E Strausser Jr, Jul 24, 2004
    #10
  11. PAUL

    Wes Newell Guest

    On Sat, 24 Jul 2004 13:36:30 -0400, Dennis E Strausser Jr wrote:

    > "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 06:44:49 +0100, PAUL wrote:
    >>
    >> > This is from the soyo website:
    >> > D
    >> > Based on the latest memory technology, Double Data Rate (DDR) SDRAM

    > offers
    >> > improved memory clock speed at 200/266/333/400 MHz

    >>
    >> In the first place, this isn't the same as dual channel, and in the second
    >> place, this is still not right because the KT266A chipset Dragon model
    >> maximum ram clock speed is 133MHz. And since they put clock speed for
    >> 200/266/333/400 MHz. the whole f*cking thing is wrong as it will only
    >> support a clock speed of 200Mhz. That's the clock speed of the ram bus on
    >> PC3200 ram. Someone must have just dreamed this crap up.

    >
    > It is right really, 200/2 = 100
    > 266/2 = 133
    > 333/2 = 166 (166.5)
    > & 400 is 200
    > 200/266/333 and 400 is the full bus.
    > The new ones are 400 mhz FSB or 800 bus.


    The 3200+ rated fsb clock speed is 200MHz, not 400. The 400 number is
    refering to data rates, not bus speeds.

    > This is supposed to go up again soon, as AMD is finding new ways
    > to turn up the speed of their CPU's


    The cpu doesn't set the FSB, the MB does. AMD may up the default though.
    End the end, the MB sets the speed and provides the clock.

    > Their new one's are either 3.2 or 3.4 GHz @ stock. I think it's called
    > FX58 but don't (") me on it.


    We're were talking about 32bit cpu's.

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
     
    Wes Newell, Jul 24, 2004
    #11
  12. "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Sat, 24 Jul 2004 13:36:30 -0400, Dennis E Strausser Jr wrote:
    >
    > > "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    > > news:p...
    > >> On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 06:44:49 +0100, PAUL wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > This is from the soyo website:
    > >> > D
    > >> > Based on the latest memory technology, Double Data Rate (DDR) SDRAM

    > > offers
    > >> > improved memory clock speed at 200/266/333/400 MHz
    > >>
    > >> In the first place, this isn't the same as dual channel, and in the

    second
    > >> place, this is still not right because the KT266A chipset Dragon model
    > >> maximum ram clock speed is 133MHz. And since they put clock speed for
    > >> 200/266/333/400 MHz. the whole f*cking thing is wrong as it will only
    > >> support a clock speed of 200Mhz. That's the clock speed of the ram bus

    on
    > >> PC3200 ram. Someone must have just dreamed this crap up.

    > >
    > > It is right really, 200/2 = 100
    > > 266/2 = 133
    > > 333/2 = 166 (166.5)
    > > & 400 is 200
    > > 200/266/333 and 400 is the full bus.
    > > The new ones are 400 mhz FSB or 800 bus.

    >
    > The 3200+ rated fsb clock speed is 200MHz, not 400. The 400 number is
    > refering to data rates, not bus speeds.
    >
    > > This is supposed to go up again soon, as AMD is finding new ways
    > > to turn up the speed of their CPU's

    >
    > The cpu doesn't set the FSB, the MB does. AMD may up the default though.
    > End the end, the MB sets the speed and provides the clock.
    >
    > > Their new one's are either 3.2 or 3.4 GHz @ stock. I think it's called
    > > FX58 but don't (") me on it.

    >
    > We're were talking about 32bit cpu's.
    >
    > --
    > Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    > http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm


    Ah, CPU-Z
    FSB is 173.6
    Bus Speed is @ 347.2
    Yeah, I'm overclocking.
    (Tbred-b) chip is a 2200+ comes up as 2600+ 2.17 and vcore 1.85
    CPU-Z Shows 1.88
    Multiplier is @ 12.5 Not far from stock.

    If you want to know yours, go over to http://www.cpuid.com
    Don't be running any other monitoring software when running CPU-Z
    it will most times get in the way of reading your system, or send temps
    way off what they really are.

    AMD's work @ 100/133/166/200 (FSB) x 2 = the Bus Speed
    Intel's work @ 100/133.25/200 (FSB) x 4 = the Bus Speed
    I'm not sure why AMD decided to keep with the older methods, but
    I cant say I could complain. It's easier to understand then some systems.
    As far back as I think anyway, the might've been the later half of the K6
    or K7.
    But I'm not sure which.
    I was thinking the start of the Pentium's used it to, but I don't think so.
    Just looked @ a board I have sitting around.
    I had the thing installed about a year or so ago, and had a
    166 Chip doing 233 Stable on just air.
    Also, I even have very, but not too very Old School.
    Not so far back as the 8086 or 8088
    But it is a DX2 66 MHz The 486.
    I also know how to set it's jumpers to overclock to 100 or so.
    I think it would be able to take more really.
    Denny. :)
     
    Dennis E Strausser Jr, Jul 25, 2004
    #12
  13. PAUL

    Wes Newell Guest

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 00:28:51 -0400, Dennis E Strausser Jr wrote:

    > Ah, CPU-Z
    > FSB is 173.6
    > Bus Speed is @ 347.2


    That's a data rate, the bus is 173.6MHz with 2 data nits per clock= 347.2
    See The Real Front Side Bus in link below.

    > If you want to know yours, go over to http://www.cpuid.com


    I don't need no stinking sw to tell me what I configured.:)

    > Don't be running any other monitoring software when running CPU-Z
    > it will most times get in the way of reading your system, or send temps
    > way off what they really are.


    I don't know if there's a CPU-Z for Linux anyway, which I run. Even if
    there were, I don't need it.
    >
    > AMD's work @ 100/133/166/200 (FSB) x 2 = the Bus Speed Intel's work @
    > 100/133.25/200 (FSB) x 4 = the Bus Speed I'm not sure why AMD decided to
    > keep with the older methods, but I cant say I could complain.


    Yeah, I know how it works. But the bus speed is still 200MHz for the
    3200+, not 400MHz. There's nothing 400MHz about the bus, although the bus
    is DDR, and so data troughput is the same as a 400MHz non DDR bus. I'm so
    sick of the way they change these numbers to make things look bigger and
    faster, it just makes me want to puke.

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
     
    Wes Newell, Jul 25, 2004
    #13
  14. "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 00:28:51 -0400, Dennis E Strausser Jr wrote:

    <Snip>
    I e-mailed AMD to just find out which of us is right on
    the FSB thing.
    They are yet to get back to me.
    By this point, this thread is getting so big, I don't care
    which of us is right or wrong on it.
    I just want to know for sure.

    I might just e-mail Intel on this as well, I want to know why..
    When they say 800 (FSB) why they don't just say 200 fsb.
    and what the heck does this 200 x 4 help?
    Only thing I can think of is this.

    200 x 2 = 400 CPU 1
    200 x 2 = 400 CPU 2
    to a total of 800
    To make it act more like there's really 2 CPU's
    If there was no bottle neck, it would be like having 2 CPU's

    What do you think on this?
    Sorry for the change of servers, I ran out of bandwidth.
    Denny. :)
     
    Dennis E Strausser Jr, Jul 27, 2004
    #14
  15. PAUL

    Wes Newell Guest

    On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 22:24:47 -0400, Dennis E Strausser Jr wrote:

    >
    > "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 00:28:51 -0400, Dennis E Strausser Jr wrote:

    > <Snip>
    > I e-mailed AMD to just find out which of us is right on
    > the FSB thing.


    You didn't have to do that. All you have to do is look at the data sheets.
    I tried pinning AMD to wall a while back about why they erroniously use
    the wrong speed of the FSB. Here's the reply.
    ------------------------------------------

    Thanks for contacting AMD's Technical Service Center. The stated FSB
    speed is the effective frequency. The physical frequency is half the
    effective frequency - 100, 133, or 166MHz. Most motherboards will state
    this physical frequency rather than the effective frequency.

    The reason for this is that, in the past, chipsets would transfer data
    once per clock cycle. With the introduction of the Athlon's chipset,
    they began transferring data twice per clock cycle, effectively doubling
    the amount of data transferred even though the physical frequency
    remained constant. This is similar to DDR (Double Data Rate) Technology,
    which is used in DDR SDRAM. You will also find similar technology used
    in other products as well, such as RDRAM.

    Hope this helps.
    Best Regards,
    Jeff Hanaoka
    AMD Technical Service Center


    Original Message Follows:
    ------------------------
    You refer to the Athlon FSB speeds as 200mhz, 266mhz, and 333mhz. Is
    this really the front side bus speed? I can't find a motherboard that
    supports front side bus speeds higher than 166mhz. What gives?

    ------------------------------

    > They are yet to get back to me.
    > By this point, this thread is getting so big, I don't care
    > which of us is right or wrong on it.
    > I just want to know for sure.
    >




    > I might just e-mail Intel on this as well, I want to know why..
    > When they say 800 (FSB) why they don't just say 200 fsb.
    > and what the heck does this 200 x 4 help?


    Well, DDR, QDR (as I call it) helps with data throughput, and marketing
    types tlike big numbers, so they just play with them.

    > Only thing I can think of is this.
    >
    > 200 x 2 = 400 CPU 1
    > 200 x 2 = 400 CPU 2
    > to a total of 800
    > To make it act more like there's really 2 CPU's
    > If there was no bottle neck, it would be like having 2 CPU's
    >
    > What do you think on this?


    What? It's just data bandwidth. And to be honest, enough is enough. IOW's
    as long as the bandwidth is there and the cpu doesn't have to wait on it,
    these numbers don't mean crap.:)

    Now just try and use these false numbers when building an actual bus,
    determining the correct multiplier, even determining the speed to set, and
    the list goes on. Everyone knows the Athlon XP 3200+ has a muliplier of 11
    and the default speed of the cpu is a real 2200MHz. Now how easy is it to
    figure out the speed of the clock of the FSB? 2200/11=200, not 400. Bus
    speed refers to clock rates. Data rates have a whole new meaning. See The
    Real Front Side Bus in link below.

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
     
    Wes Newell, Jul 27, 2004
    #15
  16. "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 22:24:47 -0400, Dennis E Strausser Jr wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "Wes Newell" <> wrote in message
    > > news:p...
    > >> On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 00:28:51 -0400, Dennis E Strausser Jr wrote:

    > > <Snip>
    > > I e-mailed AMD to just find out which of us is right on
    > > the FSB thing.

    >
    > You didn't have to do that. All you have to do is look at the data sheets.
    > I tried pinning AMD to wall a while back about why they erroniously use
    > the wrong speed of the FSB. Here's the reply.
    > ------------------------------------------
    >
    > Thanks for contacting AMD's Technical Service Center. The stated FSB
    > speed is the effective frequency. The physical frequency is half the
    > effective frequency - 100, 133, or 166MHz. Most motherboards will state
    > this physical frequency rather than the effective frequency.
    >
    > The reason for this is that, in the past, chipsets would transfer data
    > once per clock cycle. With the introduction of the Athlon's chipset,
    > they began transferring data twice per clock cycle, effectively doubling
    > the amount of data transferred even though the physical frequency
    > remained constant. This is similar to DDR (Double Data Rate) Technology,
    > which is used in DDR SDRAM. You will also find similar technology used
    > in other products as well, such as RDRAM.
    >
    > Hope this helps.
    > Best Regards,
    > Jeff Hanaoka
    > AMD Technical Service Center
    >
    >
    > Original Message Follows:
    > ------------------------
    > You refer to the Athlon FSB speeds as 200mhz, 266mhz, and 333mhz. Is
    > this really the front side bus speed? I can't find a motherboard that
    > supports front side bus speeds higher than 166mhz. What gives?
    >
    > ------------------------------
    >
    > > They are yet to get back to me.
    > > By this point, this thread is getting so big, I don't care
    > > which of us is right or wrong on it.
    > > I just want to know for sure.
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > > I might just e-mail Intel on this as well, I want to know why..
    > > When they say 800 (FSB) why they don't just say 200 fsb.
    > > and what the heck does this 200 x 4 help?

    >
    > Well, DDR, QDR (as I call it) helps with data throughput, and marketing
    > types tlike big numbers, so they just play with them.
    >
    > > Only thing I can think of is this.
    > >
    > > 200 x 2 = 400 CPU 1
    > > 200 x 2 = 400 CPU 2
    > > to a total of 800
    > > To make it act more like there's really 2 CPU's
    > > If there was no bottle neck, it would be like having 2 CPU's
    > >
    > > What do you think on this?

    >
    > What? It's just data bandwidth. And to be honest, enough is enough. IOW's
    > as long as the bandwidth is there and the cpu doesn't have to wait on it,
    > these numbers don't mean crap.:)
    >
    > Now just try and use these false numbers when building an actual bus,
    > determining the correct multiplier, even determining the speed to set, and
    > the list goes on. Everyone knows the Athlon XP 3200+ has a muliplier of 11
    > and the default speed of the cpu is a real 2200MHz. Now how easy is it to
    > figure out the speed of the clock of the FSB? 2200/11=200, not 400. Bus
    > speed refers to clock rates. Data rates have a whole new meaning. See The
    > Real Front Side Bus in link below.
    >
    > --
    > Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    > http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm


    OK..
    So in a lot of ways, we are both right.
    Hm, marketing, only thing I can think of now.
    And with both company's, but why?
    I don't think either one of us can answer this one.

    Denny. :)
     
    Dennis E Strausser Jr, Jul 27, 2004
    #16
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