Dell Outlet Store: Certified Refurbished vs. Scratch & Dent?

Discussion in 'Dell' started by powrwrap, May 20, 2011.

  1. powrwrap

    powrwrap Guest

    I'm shopping XPS Studios in the Dell Outlet Store and they have
    "Certified Refurbished" and "Scratch and Dent". The Scratch and Dent
    versions of the computer with exact configurations is cheaper than the
    Certified Refurbished version.

    What's the difference? What does Certified Refurbished mean?
     
    powrwrap, May 20, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Hi!

    > What's the difference? What does Certified Refurbished mean?


    There isn't much. Sometimes the "scratch n dent" machines are in so-
    far-as-anyone-can-tell flawless condition, and sometimes they really
    do have a slight blemish somewhere. It's possible that a scratch-n-
    dent machine has never even been sold, where the certified refurbished
    units are typically customer returns for some reason or another.

    The "certified" part simply means that someone at Dell has inspected
    the system to some degree. However, I'm sure they do that to all the
    machines offered, no matter what they are sold as.

    William
     
    William R. Walsh, May 20, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. powrwrap

    RnR Guest

    On Fri, 20 May 2011 08:13:19 -0700 (PDT), "William R. Walsh"
    <> wrote:

    >Hi!
    >
    >> What's the difference? What does Certified Refurbished mean?

    >
    >There isn't much. Sometimes the "scratch n dent" machines are in so-
    >far-as-anyone-can-tell flawless condition, and sometimes they really
    >do have a slight blemish somewhere. It's possible that a scratch-n-
    >dent machine has never even been sold, where the certified refurbished
    >units are typically customer returns for some reason or another.
    >
    >The "certified" part simply means that someone at Dell has inspected
    >the system to some degree. However, I'm sure they do that to all the
    >machines offered, no matter what they are sold as.
    >
    >William



    William in the past I bought some scratch and dent machines and I
    couldn't see a flaw but you are correct what you said above.
     
    RnR, May 20, 2011
    #3
  4. On Fri, 20 May 2011 08:05:38 -0700, powrwrap wrote:

    > I'm shopping XPS Studios in the Dell Outlet Store and they have
    > "Certified Refurbished" and "Scratch and Dent". The Scratch and Dent
    > versions of the computer with exact configurations is cheaper than the
    > Certified Refurbished version.
    >
    > What's the difference? What does Certified Refurbished mean?



    "Certified Refurbished" is a machine that was returned to Dell from a
    lease, or repurchased by Dell for resale, or has been returned because
    more then three attempts at a field repair were ineffective. They are
    brought in, repaired and tested and then sold with a warranty.

    "Scratch and Dent" are units that have either been refused by the receiver
    (usually because of a mistake in fulfilling an order) or were slightly
    damaged during manufacturing or before packaging. They are usually NEW.

    Either should be good. General rule of thumb is the older the better. Some
    of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones.


    Dell Certified Field Engineer.
     
    Hachiroku ハチロク, May 21, 2011
    #4
  5. powrwrap

    Ben Myers Guest

    On May 21, 4:21 pm, Hachiroku ハチロク <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 20 May 2011 08:05:38 -0700, powrwrap wrote:
    > > I'm shopping XPS Studios in the Dell Outlet Store and they have
    > > "Certified Refurbished" and "Scratch and Dent". The Scratch and Dent
    > > versions of the computer with exact configurations is cheaper than the
    > > Certified Refurbished version.

    >
    > > What's the difference? What does Certified Refurbished mean?

    >
    > "Certified Refurbished" is a machine that was returned to Dell from a
    > lease, or repurchased by Dell for resale, or has been returned because
    > more then three attempts at a field repair were ineffective. They are
    > brought in, repaired and tested and then sold with a warranty.
    >
    > "Scratch and Dent" are units that have either been refused by the receiver
    > (usually because of a mistake in fulfilling an order) or were slightly
    > damaged during manufacturing or before packaging. They are usually NEW.
    >
    > Either should be good. General rule of thumb is the older the better. Some
    > of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones.
    >
    > Dell Certified Field Engineer.


    "Some of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones." An
    industry-wide trend, not just Dell. Ever cheapened construction and
    choice of components, especially thin sheet metal desktop cases.

    Some people whine and complain about black Dell clamshell cases, but
    they were sturdy. The much criticized black Mitac case used for the
    wildly popular Dimension 2400 as well as the much nicer 4600 and 4700
    is more sturdy than the cases of most all current Dell models... Ben
    Myers
     
    Ben Myers, May 22, 2011
    #5
  6. On Sat, 21 May 2011 18:40:41 -0700, Ben Myers wrote:

    > On May 21, 4:21 pm, Hachiroku <> wrote:
    >> On Fri, 20 May 2011 08:05:38 -0700, powrwrap wrote:
    >> > I'm shopping XPS Studios in the Dell Outlet Store and they have
    >> > "Certified Refurbished" and "Scratch and Dent". The Scratch and Dent
    >> > versions of the computer with exact configurations is cheaper than the
    >> > Certified Refurbished version.

    >>
    >> > What's the difference? What does Certified Refurbished mean?

    >>
    >> "Certified Refurbished" is a machine that was returned to Dell from a
    >> lease, or repurchased by Dell for resale, or has been returned because
    >> more then three attempts at a field repair were ineffective. They are
    >> brought in, repaired and tested and then sold with a warranty.
    >>
    >> "Scratch and Dent" are units that have either been refused by the receiver
    >> (usually because of a mistake in fulfilling an order) or were slightly
    >> damaged during manufacturing or before packaging. They are usually NEW.
    >>
    >> Either should be good. General rule of thumb is the older the better. Some
    >> of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones.
    >>
    >> Dell Certified Field Engineer.

    >
    > "Some of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones." An
    > industry-wide trend, not just Dell. Ever cheapened construction and
    > choice of components, especially thin sheet metal desktop cases.


    This is quite true.
    Almost all laptops are made in the same factory, and that includes Apples.

    No, it's not just Dell, but my experieince is the ones made in Malaysia
    are more robust systems. And the Inspiron and XPS models from 3-5 years
    back are the best. Also, D600 and D610 models.

    >
    > Some people whine and complain about black Dell clamshell cases, but
    > they were sturdy. The much criticized black Mitac case used for the
    > wildly popular Dimension 2400 as well as the much nicer 4600 and 4700
    > is more sturdy than the cases of most all current Dell models... Ben
    > Myers



    Nothing wrong with the black clamshells. They can be a little difficult to
    open, but no tools required. Press the latches, grasp and pull. Very nice
    design.

    The two things I have against Dell is proprietary parts, like power
    supplies. If the PSU goes belly up, you can't just run to Staples or Best
    Buy and buy one off the rack. Gotta get the Dell.

    The other is the locked BIOS, but there are good things about it: you
    can't fry something, which is probably why they did it, and Dells usually
    boot FAST! I have one of the USFF SX 260s and a 270, and the 260 boots in
    30 seconds!


    When they take enough of a hit in popularity they'll smarten up again. It
    happens about every 4-5 years...
     
    Hachiroku ハチロク, May 22, 2011
    #6
  7. powrwrap

    Bob Villa Guest

    On May 22, 3:43 am, Hachiroku ハチロク <> wrote:

    >
    > The two things I have against Dell is proprietary parts, like power
    > supplies. If the PSU goes belly up, you can't just run to Staples or Best
    > Buy and buy one off the rack. Gotta get the Dell.
    >


    This hasn't been true in probably tens years! I bought a PSU for a
    friend's Dell a few years ago and the store owner/repair person said
    it wouldn't fit...it is still working now!
     
    Bob Villa, May 22, 2011
    #7
  8. powrwrap

    RnR Guest

    On Sun, 22 May 2011 03:43:53 -0500, Hachiroku ???? <>
    wrote:

    >On Sat, 21 May 2011 18:40:41 -0700, Ben Myers wrote:
    >
    >> On May 21, 4:21 pm, Hachiroku ???? <> wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 20 May 2011 08:05:38 -0700, powrwrap wrote:
    >>> > I'm shopping XPS Studios in the Dell Outlet Store and they have
    >>> > "Certified Refurbished" and "Scratch and Dent". The Scratch and Dent
    >>> > versions of the computer with exact configurations is cheaper than the
    >>> > Certified Refurbished version.
    >>>
    >>> > What's the difference? What does Certified Refurbished mean?
    >>>
    >>> "Certified Refurbished" is a machine that was returned to Dell from a
    >>> lease, or repurchased by Dell for resale, or has been returned because
    >>> more then three attempts at a field repair were ineffective. They are
    >>> brought in, repaired and tested and then sold with a warranty.
    >>>
    >>> "Scratch and Dent" are units that have either been refused by the receiver
    >>> (usually because of a mistake in fulfilling an order) or were slightly
    >>> damaged during manufacturing or before packaging. They are usually NEW.
    >>>
    >>> Either should be good. General rule of thumb is the older the better. Some
    >>> of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones.
    >>>
    >>> Dell Certified Field Engineer.

    >>
    >> "Some of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones." An
    >> industry-wide trend, not just Dell. Ever cheapened construction and
    >> choice of components, especially thin sheet metal desktop cases.

    >
    >This is quite true.
    >Almost all laptops are made in the same factory, and that includes Apples.
    >
    >No, it's not just Dell, but my experieince is the ones made in Malaysia
    >are more robust systems. And the Inspiron and XPS models from 3-5 years
    >back are the best. Also, D600 and D610 models.
    >
    >>
    >> Some people whine and complain about black Dell clamshell cases, but
    >> they were sturdy. The much criticized black Mitac case used for the
    >> wildly popular Dimension 2400 as well as the much nicer 4600 and 4700
    >> is more sturdy than the cases of most all current Dell models... Ben
    >> Myers

    >
    >
    >Nothing wrong with the black clamshells. They can be a little difficult to
    >open, but no tools required. Press the latches, grasp and pull. Very nice
    >design.
    >
    >The two things I have against Dell is proprietary parts, like power
    >supplies. If the PSU goes belly up, you can't just run to Staples or Best
    >Buy and buy one off the rack. Gotta get the Dell.
    >
    >The other is the locked BIOS, but there are good things about it: you
    >can't fry something, which is probably why they did it, and Dells usually
    >boot FAST! I have one of the USFF SX 260s and a 270, and the 260 boots in
    >30 seconds!
    >
    >
    >When they take enough of a hit in popularity they'll smarten up again. It
    >happens about every 4-5 years...
    >


    30 seconds is good but is that straight from Dell or after you
    installed a lot of software? I haven't timed my machines but I think
    mine are more in the order of 1 or 1.5 minutes but I have a lot
    installed. Also depending on my machines, forgot which are 5400 or
    7200 drives.
     
    RnR, May 22, 2011
    #8
  9. powrwrap

    RnR Guest

    On Sun, 22 May 2011 06:14:22 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa
    <> wrote:

    >On May 22, 3:43 am, Hachiroku ???? <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> The two things I have against Dell is proprietary parts, like power
    >> supplies. If the PSU goes belly up, you can't just run to Staples or Best
    >> Buy and buy one off the rack. Gotta get the Dell.
    >>

    >
    >This hasn't been true in probably tens years! I bought a PSU for a
    >friend's Dell a few years ago and the store owner/repair person said
    >it wouldn't fit...it is still working now!



    Bob, what model? Everything I read does say proprietary and I can
    understand the frustration having to only buy from Dell. Of course I
    hope you are correct <grin>.
     
    RnR, May 22, 2011
    #9
  10. powrwrap

    Bob Villa Guest

    On May 22, 8:21am, "RnR" <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 22 May 2011 06:14:22 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa
    >
    > <> wrote:
    > >On May 22, 3:43 am, Hachiroku ???? <> wrote:

    >
    > >> The two things I have against Dell is proprietary parts, like power
    > >> supplies. If the PSU goes belly up, you can't just run to Staples or Best
    > >> Buy and buy one off the rack. Gotta get the Dell.

    >
    > >This hasn't been true in probably tens years! I bought a PSU for a
    > >friend's Dell a few years ago and the store owner/repair person said
    > >it wouldn't fit...it is still working now!

    >
    > Bob, what model? Everything I read does say proprietary and I can
    > understand the frustration having to only buy from Dell. Of course I
    > hope you are correct <grin>.


    Dim 5100. 3 of the 4 screws lined-up. The universal PSU's have
    multiple connectors...the M/B connector was 2-piece.
     
    Bob Villa, May 22, 2011
    #10
  11. powrwrap

    Ben Myers Guest

    On May 22, 4:43 am, Hachiroku ハチロク <> wrote:
    > On Sat, 21 May 2011 18:40:41 -0700, Ben Myers wrote:
    > > On May 21, 4:21 pm, Hachiroku ハチロク <> wrote:
    > >> On Fri, 20 May 2011 08:05:38 -0700, powrwrap wrote:
    > >> > I'm shopping XPS Studios in the Dell Outlet Store and they have
    > >> > "Certified Refurbished" and "Scratch and Dent". The Scratch and Dent
    > >> > versions of the computer with exact configurations is cheaper than the
    > >> > Certified Refurbished version.

    >
    > >> > What's the difference? What does Certified Refurbished mean?

    >
    > >> "Certified Refurbished" is a machine that was returned to Dell from a
    > >> lease, or repurchased by Dell for resale, or has been returned because
    > >> more then three attempts at a field repair were ineffective. They are
    > >> brought in, repaired and tested and then sold with a warranty.

    >
    > >> "Scratch and Dent" are units that have either been refused by the receiver
    > >> (usually because of a mistake in fulfilling an order) or were slightly
    > >> damaged during manufacturing or before packaging. They are usually NEW.

    >
    > >> Either should be good. General rule of thumb is the older the better. Some
    > >> of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones.

    >
    > >> Dell Certified Field Engineer.

    >
    > > "Some of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones." An
    > > industry-wide trend, not just Dell. Ever cheapened construction and
    > > choice of components, especially thin sheet metal desktop cases.

    >
    > This is quite true.
    > Almost all laptops are made in the same factory, and that includes Apples.
    >
    > No, it's not just Dell, but my experieince is the ones made in Malaysia
    > are more robust systems. And the Inspiron and XPS models from 3-5 years
    > back are the best. Also, D600 and D610 models.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Some people whine and complain about black Dell clamshell cases, but
    > > they were sturdy. The much criticized black Mitac case used for the
    > > wildly popular Dimension 2400 as well as the much nicer 4600 and 4700
    > > is more sturdy than the cases of most all current Dell models... Ben
    > > Myers

    >
    > Nothing wrong with the black clamshells. They can be a little difficult to
    > open, but no tools required. Press the latches, grasp and pull. Very nice
    > design.
    >
    > The two things I have against Dell is proprietary parts, like power
    > supplies. If the PSU goes belly up, you can't just run to Staples or Best
    > Buy and buy one off the rack. Gotta get the Dell.
    >
    > The other is the locked BIOS, but there are good things about it: you
    > can't fry something, which is probably why they did it, and Dells usually
    > boot FAST! I have one of the USFF SX 260s and a 270, and the 260 boots in
    > 30 seconds!
    >
    > When they take enough of a hit in popularity they'll smarten up again. It
    > happens about every 4-5 years...


    Dell systems have a mix of proprietary and non-proprietary parts, more
    or less proprietary depending on the models..

    Re: power supplies, some of them are proprietary and some not. The
    biggest difficulty I found with the older black Dell towers is that
    many 3rd party power supplies have an on-off rocker switch in back,
    and the switch does not fit the power supply cutout on the back of the
    case.

    The Dimension 5100 has the BTX form factor, with the layout of the
    motherboard being reversed from the older ATX. AFAIK, Dell and
    Gateway drank Intel's Kool-Aid about the technical superiority of
    BTX. Not too many other manufacturers did, and white-box BTX cases
    have always been hard to come by. BTX may well be dead or on life
    support. No surprise that a 3rd party ATX12v power supply is not a
    perfect for a BTX case.

    Any of the Dell small form factor systems have custom-sized power
    supplies with standard power connectors. But then, so do "white box"
    smaller-than-mini-ATX cases, and other manufacturers' SFF systems. I
    have a PSU problem with one of my clients in a building with lousy
    electricity. PSUs blow out on custom systems I make for them, and the
    cost of a replacement PSU is about the same as an entire case with
    PSU.

    Finally, the "two power connectors" on the 3rd party ATX12v power
    supplies. This is by design. The PSU manufacturers make them that
    way so they can be used with both older Socket 478 and newer LGA775
    motherboards. LGA775 requires a 24-pin connector, and Socket 478 uses
    20-pin. So separate the second 4-pin connector from the entire 24-pin
    one and VOILA! you have a 20-pin connector.

    The newer cheaply made Inspiron mini-towers have reverted back to mini-
    ATX from BTX. "When they take enough of a hit in popularity they'll
    smarten up again. It
    happens about every 4-5 years." Already happened... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, May 22, 2011
    #11
  12. powrwrap

    Bob Villa Guest

    On May 22, 9:38am, Ben Myers <> wrote:

    >
    > The Dimension 5100 has the BTX form factor, with the layout of the
    > motherboard being reversed from the older ATX. AFAIK, Dell and
    > Gateway drank Intel's Kool-Aid about the technical superiority of
    > BTX. Not too many other manufacturers did, and white-box BTX cases
    > have always been hard to come by. BTX may well be dead or on life
    > support. No surprise that a 3rd party ATX12v power supply is not a
    > perfect for a BTX case.
    >


    So, to re-cap...I got lucky!?
     
    Bob Villa, May 23, 2011
    #12
  13. powrwrap

    RnR Guest

    On Mon, 23 May 2011 04:41:43 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa
    <> wrote:

    >On May 22, 9:38am, Ben Myers <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> The Dimension 5100 has the BTX form factor, with the layout of the
    >> motherboard being reversed from the older ATX. AFAIK, Dell and
    >> Gateway drank Intel's Kool-Aid about the technical superiority of
    >> BTX. Not too many other manufacturers did, and white-box BTX cases
    >> have always been hard to come by. BTX may well be dead or on life
    >> support. No surprise that a 3rd party ATX12v power supply is not a
    >> perfect for a BTX case.
    >>

    >
    >So, to re-cap...I got lucky!?



    Sure looks that way. I wish there was a site that offers which dell
    models are proprietary and non-proprietary for power supplies. I
    realize there are a lot of dell models going way back but still would
    be handy for the DIYs.
     
    RnR, May 23, 2011
    #13
  14. powrwrap

    Bob Villa Guest

    On May 23, 6:47am, "RnR" <> wrote:
    > On Mon, 23 May 2011 04:41:43 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa
    >
    > <> wrote:
    > >On May 22, 9:38am, Ben Myers <> wrote:

    >
    > >> The Dimension 5100 has the BTX form factor, with the layout of the
    > >> motherboard being reversed from the older ATX. AFAIK, Dell and
    > >> Gateway drank Intel's Kool-Aid about the technical superiority of
    > >> BTX. Not too many other manufacturers did, and white-box BTX cases
    > >> have always been hard to come by. BTX may well be dead or on life
    > >> support. No surprise that a 3rd party ATX12v power supply is not a
    > >> perfect for a BTX case.

    >
    > >So, to re-cap...I got lucky!?

    >
    > Sure looks that way. I wish there was a site that offers which dell
    > models are proprietary and non-proprietary for power supplies. I
    > realize there are a lot of dell models going way back but still would
    > be handy for the DIYs.


    I had the old PSU to compare at the guy's shop...even then, he said it
    wouldn't work! Some people have no flexibility in their thought
    process.
     
    Bob Villa, May 23, 2011
    #14
  15. powrwrap

    Ben Myers Guest

    On May 23, 7:41am, Bob Villa <> wrote:
    > On May 22, 9:38am, Ben Myers <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > The Dimension 5100 has the BTX form factor, with the layout of the
    > > motherboard being reversed from the older ATX. AFAIK, Dell and
    > > Gateway drank Intel's Kool-Aid about the technical superiority of
    > > BTX. Not too many other manufacturers did, and white-box BTX cases
    > > have always been hard to come by. BTX may well be dead or on life
    > > support. No surprise that a 3rd party ATX12v power supply is not a
    > > perfect for a BTX case.

    >
    > So, to re-cap...I got lucky!?


    Meatloaf said two out of three ain't bad. Three out of four is even a
    higher percentage, and solid enough to hold a power supply in place.
    Lucky? Not exactly. A victim of serendipity.

    Now you understand why may computer shops cringe at the prospect of
    repairing a name brand computer.

    It has been a long time since any computer manufacturer used a
    proprietary power supply connector in anything except the little small
    form factor units. And even those can be standard, e.g. little black
    Optiplex GX240/GX260/GX270/GX280.

    The screw mounting holes and the dimensions of the power supply,
    including depth in the case, are the two most important factors in
    making sure a generic power supply replacement is OK. Next are the
    cables to connect peripheral devices, both number and length. The
    latter are not at all standard, as some power supplies (e.g. Antec)
    are made to power a full ATX tower stuffed with numerous hard drives.
    I have used Antec power supplies as replacements in Dell systems, and
    ended up bundling extra cables with cable ties to keep them out of the
    way... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, May 23, 2011
    #15
  16. powrwrap

    powrwrap Guest

    On May 22, 8:14 am, Bob Villa <> wrote:
    > On May 22, 3:43 am, Hachiroku ハチロク <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > The two things I have against Dell is proprietary parts, like power
    > > supplies. If the PSU goes belly up, you can't just run to Staples or Best
    > > Buy and buy one off the rack. Gotta get the Dell.

    >
    > This hasn't been true in probably tens years! I bought a PSU for a
    > friend's Dell a few years ago and the store owner/repair person said
    > it wouldn't fit...it is still working now!


    Indeed. I recently replaced the power supply in my Dim 4600 with an
    off the shelf unit. Everything lined up, everything works.
     
    powrwrap, May 23, 2011
    #16
  17. powrwrap

    RnR Guest

    On Mon, 23 May 2011 06:15:02 -0700 (PDT), Ben Myers
    <> wrote:

    >On May 23, 7:41am, Bob Villa <> wrote:
    >> On May 22, 9:38am, Ben Myers <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > The Dimension 5100 has the BTX form factor, with the layout of the
    >> > motherboard being reversed from the older ATX. AFAIK, Dell and
    >> > Gateway drank Intel's Kool-Aid about the technical superiority of
    >> > BTX. Not too many other manufacturers did, and white-box BTX cases
    >> > have always been hard to come by. BTX may well be dead or on life
    >> > support. No surprise that a 3rd party ATX12v power supply is not a
    >> > perfect for a BTX case.

    >>
    >> So, to re-cap...I got lucky!?

    >
    >Meatloaf said two out of three ain't bad. Three out of four is even a
    >higher percentage, and solid enough to hold a power supply in place.
    >Lucky? Not exactly. A victim of serendipity.
    >
    >Now you understand why may computer shops cringe at the prospect of
    >repairing a name brand computer.
    >
    >It has been a long time since any computer manufacturer used a
    >proprietary power supply connector in anything except the little small
    >form factor units. And even those can be standard, e.g. little black
    >Optiplex GX240/GX260/GX270/GX280.
    >
    >The screw mounting holes and the dimensions of the power supply,
    >including depth in the case, are the two most important factors in
    >making sure a generic power supply replacement is OK. Next are the
    >cables to connect peripheral devices, both number and length. The
    >latter are not at all standard, as some power supplies (e.g. Antec)
    >are made to power a full ATX tower stuffed with numerous hard drives.
    >I have used Antec power supplies as replacements in Dell systems, and
    >ended up bundling extra cables with cable ties to keep them out of the
    >way... Ben Myers



    Doesn't sound like it's for the faint of heart <grin>. I never
    messed with any (not counting using splitters) as I"ve been lucky
    with power supplies on my dells but I don't think I would mess with
    them unless I replaced with the same... of course that would cost me
    but I'd have a piece of mind knowing I don't have to worry if it will
    work. I don't like messing with power supplies tho I don't mind
    messing with the rest of the components and could build my own system
    but as I get older, I get lazier and just prefer to buy another dell
    (I bet Michael likes to hear that)... besides I'm no gamer so I don't
    need anything custom built.
     
    RnR, May 23, 2011
    #17
  18. On Sun, 22 May 2011 08:18:31 -0500, RnR wrote:

    > On Sun, 22 May 2011 03:43:53 -0500, Hachiroku ???? <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 21 May 2011 18:40:41 -0700, Ben Myers wrote:
    >>
    >>> On May 21, 4:21 pm, Hachiroku ???? <> wrote:
    >>>> On Fri, 20 May 2011 08:05:38 -0700, powrwrap wrote:
    >>>> > I'm shopping XPS Studios in the Dell Outlet Store and they have
    >>>> > "Certified Refurbished" and "Scratch and Dent". The Scratch and Dent
    >>>> > versions of the computer with exact configurations is cheaper than the
    >>>> > Certified Refurbished version.
    >>>>
    >>>> > What's the difference? What does Certified Refurbished mean?
    >>>>
    >>>> "Certified Refurbished" is a machine that was returned to Dell from a
    >>>> lease, or repurchased by Dell for resale, or has been returned because
    >>>> more then three attempts at a field repair were ineffective. They are
    >>>> brought in, repaired and tested and then sold with a warranty.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Scratch and Dent" are units that have either been refused by the receiver
    >>>> (usually because of a mistake in fulfilling an order) or were slightly
    >>>> damaged during manufacturing or before packaging. They are usually NEW.
    >>>>
    >>>> Either should be good. General rule of thumb is the older the better. Some
    >>>> of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones.
    >>>>
    >>>> Dell Certified Field Engineer.
    >>>
    >>> "Some of the new machines aren't as good as the older ones." An
    >>> industry-wide trend, not just Dell. Ever cheapened construction and
    >>> choice of components, especially thin sheet metal desktop cases.

    >>
    >>This is quite true.
    >>Almost all laptops are made in the same factory, and that includes Apples.
    >>
    >>No, it's not just Dell, but my experieince is the ones made in Malaysia
    >>are more robust systems. And the Inspiron and XPS models from 3-5 years
    >>back are the best. Also, D600 and D610 models.
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Some people whine and complain about black Dell clamshell cases, but
    >>> they were sturdy. The much criticized black Mitac case used for the
    >>> wildly popular Dimension 2400 as well as the much nicer 4600 and 4700
    >>> is more sturdy than the cases of most all current Dell models... Ben
    >>> Myers

    >>
    >>
    >>Nothing wrong with the black clamshells. They can be a little difficult to
    >>open, but no tools required. Press the latches, grasp and pull. Very nice
    >>design.
    >>
    >>The two things I have against Dell is proprietary parts, like power
    >>supplies. If the PSU goes belly up, you can't just run to Staples or Best
    >>Buy and buy one off the rack. Gotta get the Dell.
    >>
    >>The other is the locked BIOS, but there are good things about it: you
    >>can't fry something, which is probably why they did it, and Dells usually
    >>boot FAST! I have one of the USFF SX 260s and a 270, and the 260 boots in
    >>30 seconds!
    >>
    >>
    >>When they take enough of a hit in popularity they'll smarten up again. It
    >>happens about every 4-5 years...
    >>

    >
    > 30 seconds is good but is that straight from Dell or after you
    > installed a lot of software? I haven't timed my machines but I think
    > mine are more in the order of 1 or 1.5 minutes but I have a lot
    > installed. Also depending on my machines, forgot which are 5400 or
    > 7200 drives.



    This is a machine I use basically to print my tickets in the morning and
    is near my garage door, so is used as an "OOOPS" system when I can't get a
    part off a car.

    So, basically, it doesn't have a lot of stuff on it. Basic system, MS
    Office and FireFox.
     
    Hachiroku ハチロク, May 25, 2011
    #18
  19. On Sun, 22 May 2011 06:14:22 -0700, Bob Villa wrote:

    > On May 22, 3:43 am, Hachiroku <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> The two things I have against Dell is proprietary parts, like power
    >> supplies. If the PSU goes belly up, you can't just run to Staples or Best
    >> Buy and buy one off the rack. Gotta get the Dell.
    >>

    >
    > This hasn't been true in probably tens years! I bought a PSU for a
    > friend's Dell a few years ago and the store owner/repair person said
    > it wouldn't fit...it is still working now!


    interesting. What model was it? Some of the Chinese ones I'm seeing are
    pretty much "Dell" in name only. A bunch of off the rack parts thrown into
    a Dell box.

    A friend of mine sent me a message needing a PSU for his 4600, and had to
    get a dead computer from one of my clients to get a PSU for it.

    I have noticed the preprietary stuff going away in the current generation.
     
    Hachiroku ハチロク, May 25, 2011
    #19
  20. powrwrap

    Ben Myers Guest

    On May 24, 9:33 pm, Hachiroku ハチロク <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 22 May 2011 06:14:22 -0700, Bob Villa wrote:
    > > On May 22, 3:43 am, Hachiroku ハチロク <> wrote:

    >
    > >> The two things I have against Dell is proprietary parts, like power
    > >> supplies. If the PSU goes belly up, you can't just run to Staples or Best
    > >> Buy and buy one off the rack. Gotta get the Dell.

    >
    > > This hasn't been true in probably tens years! I bought a PSU for a
    > > friend's Dell a few years ago and the store owner/repair person said
    > > it wouldn't fit...it is still working now!

    >
    > interesting. What model was it? Some of the Chinese ones I'm seeing are
    > pretty much "Dell" in name only. A bunch of off the rack parts thrown into
    > a Dell box.
    >
    > A friend of mine sent me a message needing a PSU for his 4600, and had to
    > get a dead computer from one of my clients to get a PSU for it.
    >
    > I have noticed the preprietary stuff going away in the current generation.


    Huh? Why not a generic power supply for a 4600? There is exactly one
    difference between an original 4600 power supply and a generic one.
    If the generic power supply has an on-off rocker switch in the back,
    the placement of the switch may not fit the power supply cutout hole
    on the back of the 4600 case. I have selectively used non-Dell power
    supplies in all manner of black chassis Dell Precision, Dimension, and
    Optiplex boxes with no ill effects to the PSU, the system or me.
    These are systems even 8 or 9 years old, so use of mostly non-
    proprietary parts by Dell is not new.

    "Some of the Chinese ones I'm seeing are pretty much "Dell" in name
    only." Um, aren't they all Chinese? Haven't they been so for some
    time. The 4600 uses a Mitac case. Mitac stuff is made in? Yes!
    Right! China! Optiplex GX270's were manufactured by Foxconn, the
    same Foxconn (aka Hon Hai) that has massive factories on mainland
    China.

    Get you facts right... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, May 25, 2011
    #20
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