Difference between i865 and i875?

Discussion in 'Abit' started by husker3in4, Oct 29, 2004.

  1. husker3in4

    husker3in4 Guest

    Im about to get a new board. I've used the i865 in the past, and had no problems with it. The 875 is more expensive, so I'm
    assuming its better. Some of the benchmarks that came out when both chipsets were new show not much if any performance
    differance. What warrants the higher price on the i875 chipsets then? Im debating between the IS-7 and the IC-7. I do alot of
    gaming on my computer too. Can anyone offer any insight? Thanks.
    husker3in4, Oct 29, 2004
    #1
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  2. "husker3in4" wrote in message...
    > The 875 is more expensive, so I'm assuming its better.


    A little bit, but the performances aren't huge. The original differences
    between the chipsets were that the 875 supports ECC main memory (nobody
    apart from server users care about that anyway) and Performance Acceleration
    Technology, which shortens the memory pathways, boosting performance.

    The thing was that the motherboard makers worked out a way to enable
    PAT-like performance on 865 too, which is why the benchmarks are close.

    > What warrants the higher price on the i875 chipsets then?


    It's the best Intel/DDR chipset, period. That's not to say 865 isn't really
    good as well, just not quite there.

    > Im debating between the IS-7 and the IC-7. I do alot of gaming on my
    > computer too. Can anyone offer any insight? Thanks.


    The IC7-G and IC7-Max3 are excellent overclocking platforms, slightly better
    than the IS7 series. The best way to use these boards is with a Northwood
    2.4, 2.6 or 2.8C and some really fast memory. If you want to squeeze the
    last bit of performance and want the best you can buy, one of these boards
    will be the choice, depending on whether or not you need serial or parallel
    ports. If, however, you don't need the extra SATA controllers, CSA ethernet,
    ultimate overclockability and so-on, save yourself a few quid and get the
    IS7.
    --


    Richard Hopkins
    Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    (replace .nospam with .com in reply address)

    The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
    Get the most out of your digital photos www.dabsxpose.com
    Richard Hopkins, Oct 29, 2004
    #2
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  3. husker3in4

    husker3in4 Guest

    Thanks for the advice. I dont do overclocking at all, so I wouldnt need that capability. Regarding the extra SATA ports, does
    that mean I can run 2, 3 or 4 SATA drives and still be able to use the 2 IDE ports for my DVD-rom and DVD-burner? Also, does
    the IC7 come with a built in Firewire port? That would be handy. I would probably putting on a P4 3.2E cpu on there, and not
    overclock it. I already have 1GB of PC3200 DDR, and a kickin video card (GF 6800 GT). I've used ASUS motherboards for a
    couple years now, but have had great luck with the ABIT IS-10/7 while building machines for other people. The onboard sound
    on those ABITs seems to be a little more clear also. Thanks for your help.

    On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 22:03:59 +0100, "Richard Hopkins" <> wrote:

    >"husker3in4" wrote in message...
    >> The 875 is more expensive, so I'm assuming its better.

    >
    >A little bit, but the performances aren't huge. The original differences
    >between the chipsets were that the 875 supports ECC main memory (nobody
    >apart from server users care about that anyway) and Performance Acceleration
    >Technology, which shortens the memory pathways, boosting performance.
    >
    >The thing was that the motherboard makers worked out a way to enable
    >PAT-like performance on 865 too, which is why the benchmarks are close.
    >
    >> What warrants the higher price on the i875 chipsets then?

    >
    >It's the best Intel/DDR chipset, period. That's not to say 865 isn't really
    >good as well, just not quite there.
    >
    >> Im debating between the IS-7 and the IC-7. I do alot of gaming on my
    >> computer too. Can anyone offer any insight? Thanks.

    >
    >The IC7-G and IC7-Max3 are excellent overclocking platforms, slightly better
    >than the IS7 series. The best way to use these boards is with a Northwood
    >2.4, 2.6 or 2.8C and some really fast memory. If you want to squeeze the
    >last bit of performance and want the best you can buy, one of these boards
    >will be the choice, depending on whether or not you need serial or parallel
    >ports. If, however, you don't need the extra SATA controllers, CSA ethernet,
    >ultimate overclockability and so-on, save yourself a few quid and get the
    >IS7.
    husker3in4, Oct 29, 2004
    #3
  4. "husker3in4" <> wrote in message...
    > Thanks for the advice. I dont do overclocking at all


    If you "don't do" overclocking, why on earth are you here talking about
    premium motherboards? Intel makes plenty of motherboards that are free of
    any overclocking related features, as do plenty of the cheaper motherboard
    makers. Are you allergic to it or something?

    > so I wouldnt need that capability.


    Really? Your logic seems a little screwed up. You seem to want a high
    performance system, but you're completely ignoring a way to get yourself a
    stack more performance for free.

    > Regarding the extra SATA ports, does that mean I can run 2, 3 or 4 SATA
    > drives and still be able to use the 2 IDE ports for my DVD-rom and
    > DVD-burner?


    The IC7-G will let you run four S-ATA devices plus four parallel ATA
    devices. The IC7 Max 3 will let you run six S-ATA devices plus four parallel
    giving ten in total.

    > Also, does the IC7 come with a built in Firewire port?


    Don't remember. Why don't you look at the specs on Abit's website and find
    out?

    > I would probably putting on a P4 3.2E cpu on there, and not
    > overclock it.


    Why? The Prescott CPU's are poor performers, and if you can still find one,
    you'd be far better off with a Northwood. Even then, if you're building this
    system for performance, you'd be far better off finding a 2.6 or 2.8GHz CPU
    and getting over your apparent aversion to overclocking. The result will
    piss on your proposed 3.2E system running at stock speed.
    --


    Richard Hopkins
    Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    (replace .nospam with .com in reply address)

    The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
    Get the most out of your digital photos www.dabsxpose.com
    Richard Hopkins, Oct 30, 2004
    #4
  5. husker3in4

    husker3in4 Guest

    I just prefer to stick with known brands of motherboards. I dont overclock because Id rather not risk burning up or otherwise
    damaging the hardware I just shelled out for, for a few fps. Thanks for the advice tho.

    On Sat, 30 Oct 2004 01:02:59 +0100, "Richard Hopkins" <> wrote:

    >"husker3in4" <> wrote in message...
    >> Thanks for the advice. I dont do overclocking at all

    >
    >If you "don't do" overclocking, why on earth are you here talking about
    >premium motherboards? Intel makes plenty of motherboards that are free of
    >any overclocking related features, as do plenty of the cheaper motherboard
    >makers. Are you allergic to it or something?
    >
    >> so I wouldnt need that capability.

    >
    >Really? Your logic seems a little screwed up. You seem to want a high
    >performance system, but you're completely ignoring a way to get yourself a
    >stack more performance for free.
    >
    >> Regarding the extra SATA ports, does that mean I can run 2, 3 or 4 SATA
    >> drives and still be able to use the 2 IDE ports for my DVD-rom and
    >> DVD-burner?

    >
    >The IC7-G will let you run four S-ATA devices plus four parallel ATA
    >devices. The IC7 Max 3 will let you run six S-ATA devices plus four parallel
    >giving ten in total.
    >
    >> Also, does the IC7 come with a built in Firewire port?

    >
    >Don't remember. Why don't you look at the specs on Abit's website and find
    >out?
    >
    >> I would probably putting on a P4 3.2E cpu on there, and not
    >> overclock it.

    >
    >Why? The Prescott CPU's are poor performers, and if you can still find one,
    >you'd be far better off with a Northwood. Even then, if you're building this
    >system for performance, you'd be far better off finding a 2.6 or 2.8GHz CPU
    >and getting over your apparent aversion to overclocking. The result will
    >piss on your proposed 3.2E system running at stock speed.
    husker3in4, Oct 30, 2004
    #5
  6. "husker3in4" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I just prefer to stick with known brands of motherboards.


    Intel isn't a known brand?

    > I dont overclock because Id rather not risk burning up or
    > otherwise damaging the hardware I just shelled out for,
    > for a few fps.


    Again, your logic is crap. If you overclock sensibly and with a degree of
    thought and attention, there is *no* more risk of the components "burning
    up" than there is from running them at default speeds. This is especially
    true nowadays with the thermal protection mechanisms built into P4
    motherboards.

    At end of day if you are stupid/inept/ignorant enough to "burn up" an
    overclocked system, you are also stupid/inept/ignorant enough to f*ck up a
    non-overclocked system. If you genuinely are stupid, inept or ignorant, the
    safest course of action would be to avoid DIY computers altogether and go
    buy a Dell or something like that.
    --


    Richard Hopkins
    Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    (replace .nospam with .com in reply address)

    The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
    Get the most out of your digital photos www.dabsxpose.com
    Richard Hopkins, Oct 30, 2004
    #6
  7. husker3in4

    dutchovenguy Guest

    Not everyone wants to do it your way. Get over yourself. People are allowed
    to stray outside YOUR idea of what people should do.

    Husker3in4... I say go for it and let us know how it turns out!

    "Richard Hopkins" <> wrote in message
    >
    > At end of day if you are stupid/inept/ignorant enough to "burn up" an
    > overclocked system, you are also stupid/inept/ignorant enough to f*ck up a
    > non-overclocked system. If you genuinely are stupid, inept or ignorant,

    the
    > safest course of action would be to avoid DIY computers altogether and go
    > buy a Dell or something like that.
    > --
    >
    >
    > Richard Hopkins
    > Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    > (replace .nospam with .com in reply address)
    >
    dutchovenguy, Nov 1, 2004
    #7
  8. "dutchovenguy" wrote in message...
    > Not everyone wants to do it your way.


    "My" way? I didn't mention a way, one way or the other.

    Husker was making out like there's some sort of risk inherent in
    overclocking his computer: "I dont overclock because Id rather not risk
    burning up or otherwise damaging the hardware". Without wishing to labour
    the point, I said that the only circumstances under which you'd damage an
    overclocked computer were if you were stupid (etc.), and if you *were*
    stupid, you'd damage a non-overclocked computer just as quickly.

    > Get over yourself. People are allowed to stray outside YOUR idea
    > of what people should do.


    Pmsl, suggest you count to ten and read my post again, as you've got totally
    the wrong end of the stick. The inference is that if the OP is not inept
    (etc.), there's no greater risk involved in running an overclocked system
    than there is in running it stock, and a nice, free performance gain to be
    had into the bargain.
    --


    Richard Hopkins
    Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    (replace .nospam with .com in reply address)

    The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
    Get the most out of your digital photos www.dabsxpose.com
    Richard Hopkins, Nov 1, 2004
    #8
  9. husker3in4

    JH Guest

    >Also, does
    > the IC7 come with a built in Firewire port?


    I have the IS7 and it includes an onboard Firewire port.


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    JH, Nov 1, 2004
    #9
  10. husker3in4

    husker3in4 Guest

    Thanks for all the input in this thread. I ordered the IS7.

    On Mon, 1 Nov 2004 08:23:08 -0500, "JH" <> wrote:

    >>Also, does
    >> the IC7 come with a built in Firewire port?

    >
    >I have the IS7 and it includes an onboard Firewire port.
    >
    >
    >---
    >Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    >Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    >Version: 6.0.786 / Virus Database: 532 - Release Date: 10/29/2004
    >
    husker3in4, Nov 4, 2004
    #10
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