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Enclosures

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by D Yuniskis, Mar 19, 2010.

  1. D Yuniskis

    D Yuniskis Guest

    Hi,

    I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    simple rectangular prism shape.

    So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    the angle is too shallow).

    If push comes to shove, I can have a friend mill them
    out of blocks of aluminum but that seems terribly wasteful!

    I'm wondering, instead, if I can't hack together something
    with a sheet metal skeleton (or, maybe even a cardboard or
    wooden form!) and fiberglass? This doesn't need to be
    terribly strong, structurally. And, I could no doubt
    come up with a way of mounting everything to a *base*
    (i.e., to eliminate the need for fasteners *in* the skin).

    Has anyone done this sort of thing before? Pointers to
    helpful tips as well as things to avoid... :>

    Thanks!
    --don
     
    D Yuniskis, Mar 19, 2010
    #1
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  2. D Yuniskis

    Rich Webb Guest

    On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 10:32:42 -0700, D Yuniskis
    <> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >simple rectangular prism shape.
    >
    >So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    >appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    >the angle is too shallow).
    >
    >If push comes to shove, I can have a friend mill them
    >out of blocks of aluminum but that seems terribly wasteful!
    >
    >I'm wondering, instead, if I can't hack together something
    >with a sheet metal skeleton (or, maybe even a cardboard or
    >wooden form!) and fiberglass? This doesn't need to be
    >terribly strong, structurally. And, I could no doubt
    >come up with a way of mounting everything to a *base*
    >(i.e., to eliminate the need for fasteners *in* the skin).
    >
    >Has anyone done this sort of thing before? Pointers to
    >helpful tips as well as things to avoid... :>


    Some possibles from my bookmarks list:
    http://www.polycase.com/
    http://www.rose-bopla.com/Main_Pgs/Table_of_Contents.htm
    and of course http://www.hammondmfg.com/


    --
    Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
     
    Rich Webb, Mar 19, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. D Yuniskis

    Dombo Guest

    D Yuniskis schreef:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    > enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    > simple rectangular prism shape.
    >
    > So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    > appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    > the angle is too shallow).


    Depending on your specific requirements a 3D printer could be an option
    for plastic enclosures. Companies which offer prototyping services often
    have one.
     
    Dombo, Mar 19, 2010
    #3
  4. D Yuniskis

    Charlie E. Guest

    On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 11:02:04 -0700, Tim Wescott <>
    wrote:

    >D Yuniskis wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >> enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >> simple rectangular prism shape.
    >>
    >> So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    >> appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    >> the angle is too shallow).
    >>
    >> If push comes to shove, I can have a friend mill them
    >> out of blocks of aluminum but that seems terribly wasteful!
    >>
    >> I'm wondering, instead, if I can't hack together something
    >> with a sheet metal skeleton (or, maybe even a cardboard or
    >> wooden form!) and fiberglass? This doesn't need to be
    >> terribly strong, structurally. And, I could no doubt
    >> come up with a way of mounting everything to a *base*
    >> (i.e., to eliminate the need for fasteners *in* the skin).
    >>
    >> Has anyone done this sort of thing before? Pointers to
    >> helpful tips as well as things to avoid... :>
    >>
    >> Thanks!
    >> --don

    >
    >I'm not sure what you're thinking of in terms of a "skeleton", but a
    >fiberglass enclosure, by itself, would certainly be structurally sound
    >enough for anything small.
    >
    >Be aware that polyester resin has a smell that many find objectionable
    >when it's fresh, and it takes quite a while to tone down. Cheap
    >polyester resin is worse (it's actually the styrene filler that smells
    >bad), and applying it poorly also makes it worse.
    >
    >So fiberglass with some other resin may work better, if you're willing
    >to dink with it, or if you can find a fabricator who is.
    >
    >If a sheet metal case would be acceptable, then consider finding a sheet
    >metal fabricator to make you some. A run of 20 will cost a lot more in
    >setup and design than in the actual case itself, but if you just gotta
    >have a case, you just gotta have a case.


    If you really need something custom, then consider clear plastic, like
    you can get at Home Depot. It is easy to cut, and you can get plastic
    glues that bond it like it is all one piece. If you don't want it
    transparent, get some plastic spray paint and paint the inside to any
    color you want!

    If you are careful, you can even drill and tap it, although I would
    recommend using a nut glued and embedded in the plastic as more
    reliable.

    Charlie
     
    Charlie E., Mar 19, 2010
    #4
  5. D Yuniskis wrote:

    > I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    > enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    > simple rectangular prism shape.


    So now we know what you're _not_ looking for. But we don't know what
    you _are_ looking for. How is anybody supposed to be able to offer
    meaningful suggestions based on that?

    What actually is the shape you're trying to get?
    What size?
    What colour / surface finish?
    How good does it have to look (e.g.: visible screws, tool marks)?
    Any requirements about sharp edges / curve radii?
    What's it allowed to weigh?
    How tightly does it have to fit the content?
    What tolerances (i.e. how equal do those 20 units have to be)?
    What's the budget, both in terms of money and time?
    What skill level can be expected from the person building it?
     
    Hans-Bernhard Bröker, Mar 19, 2010
    #5
  6. D Yuniskis

    D Yuniskis Guest

    Hi Tim,

    Tim Wescott wrote:
    > D Yuniskis wrote:
    >> I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >> enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >> simple rectangular prism shape.
    >>
    >> I'm wondering, instead, if I can't hack together something
    >> with a sheet metal skeleton (or, maybe even a cardboard or
    >> wooden form!) and fiberglass? This doesn't need to be
    >> terribly strong, structurally. And, I could no doubt
    >> come up with a way of mounting everything to a *base*
    >> (i.e., to eliminate the need for fasteners *in* the skin).

    >
    > I'm not sure what you're thinking of in terms of a "skeleton", but a
    > fiberglass enclosure, by itself, would certainly be structurally sound
    > enough for anything small.


    The "skeleton" idea would allow me to fasten things to
    that skeleton and drape the fiberglass around it.
    (i.e., instead of trying to fasten to the fiberglass
    itself)

    The other option was to fasten everything to a "base"
    and hang the fiberglass shell over that.

    > Be aware that polyester resin has a smell that many find objectionable
    > when it's fresh, and it takes quite a while to tone down. Cheap


    Yes. But time "cures" that problem ;-)

    > polyester resin is worse (it's actually the styrene filler that smells
    > bad), and applying it poorly also makes it worse.
    >
    > So fiberglass with some other resin may work better, if you're willing
    > to dink with it, or if you can find a fabricator who is.
    >
    > If a sheet metal case would be acceptable, then consider finding a sheet
    > metal fabricator to make you some. A run of 20 will cost a lot more in
    > setup and design than in the actual case itself, but if you just gotta
    > have a case, you just gotta have a case.


    Sheet metal as the *exposed* case makes it a bit more
    difficult to get nice edges, etc. (unless you are extruding
    something). "Seams" would need to be finished (filler?)
    and then painted, etc.

    That's why I came up with the fiberglass-over-skeleton
    approach -- let the skeleton (aluminum/sheet metal)
    give a basic form and some support for the internals
    and then let the fiberglass "sex it up" :-/
     
    D Yuniskis, Mar 19, 2010
    #6
  7. D Yuniskis

    D Yuniskis Guest

    Hi Charlie,

    Charlie E. wrote:
    > On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 11:02:04 -0700, Tim Wescott <>
    >
    >> D Yuniskis wrote:
    >>> I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >>> enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >>> simple rectangular prism shape.
    >>>
    >>> I'm wondering, instead, if I can't hack together something
    >>> with a sheet metal skeleton (or, maybe even a cardboard or
    >>> wooden form!) and fiberglass? This doesn't need to be
    >>> terribly strong, structurally. And, I could no doubt
    >>> come up with a way of mounting everything to a *base*
    >>> (i.e., to eliminate the need for fasteners *in* the skin).
    >>>

    >> I'm not sure what you're thinking of in terms of a "skeleton", but a
    >> fiberglass enclosure, by itself, would certainly be structurally sound
    >> enough for anything small.
    >>
    >> If a sheet metal case would be acceptable, then consider finding a sheet
    >> metal fabricator to make you some. A run of 20 will cost a lot more in
    >> setup and design than in the actual case itself, but if you just gotta
    >> have a case, you just gotta have a case.

    >
    > If you really need something custom, then consider clear plastic, like
    > you can get at Home Depot. It is easy to cut, and you can get plastic
    > glues that bond it like it is all one piece. If you don't want it
    > transparent, get some plastic spray paint and paint the inside to any
    > color you want!


    I've used lexan in the past for this sort of approach. Solvent
    weld the "corners", file to debur, paint.

    But, it's hard to get anything other than a bunch of "planar
    surfaces". (well, maybe if you used *thick* plastic and
    filed/sanded away a *lot* you could get to an arbitrary
    curved surface)

    The fiberlass advantage -- especially over a wooden form -- would
    let me "sculpt" the outer surface instead of relying on how
    many flat "facets" I wanted to glue together :-/

    > If you are careful, you can even drill and tap it, although I would
    > recommend using a nut glued and embedded in the plastic as more
    > reliable.
     
    D Yuniskis, Mar 19, 2010
    #7
  8. hamilton wrote:

    > I have seen 3D printer cases that I would not give to a customer.


    Strongly seconded. 3D printer output material tends to be _way_ too
    brittle to actually expose to customer hands --- and it's usually in the
    wrong colour or opacity, too.

    It's good to _show_ a shape, but sucks at _holding_ that shape.

    As a rough reference point, you shouldn't try to hold an LCD's
    zebra-rubber connectors in place using 3D-printer pieces only. At least
    those parts of the setup experiencing pull-stress will break almost
    immediately.
     
    Hans-Bernhard Bröker, Mar 19, 2010
    #8
  9. D Yuniskis

    D Yuniskis Guest

    Hi Rich,

    Rich Webb wrote:
    > On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 10:32:42 -0700, D Yuniskis
    >> I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >> enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >> simple rectangular prism shape.
    >>
    >> So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    >> appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    >> the angle is too shallow).

    >
    > Some possibles from my bookmarks list:
    > http://www.polycase.com/
    > http://www.rose-bopla.com/Main_Pgs/Table_of_Contents.htm
    > and of course http://www.hammondmfg.com/


    I had already checked ploycase and hammond -- no joy there.
    I chased the second link you provided and they don't seem to have
    anything either.

    I'm pretty sure I am going to have to roll my own.
    So, it boils down to figuring out what the limitations
    of any process I might adopt would be.
     
    D Yuniskis, Mar 19, 2010
    #9
  10. D Yuniskis

    whit3rd Guest

    On Mar 19, 10:32 am, D Yuniskis <> wrote:

    > I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    > enclosures.  But, I'm looking for something other than a
    > simple rectangular prism shape.
    >
    > So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    > appropriate


    Three ideas: sheetmetal work is fairly easy, if you can
    find a shop with brakes and shears, they
    can whip up a variety of flat-surfaced boxy things.
    Spotwelding or POP rivets or PEM nuts are suitable
    for the fastenings.

    Polycarbonate or acrylic sheeting can be heated in an
    oven to sag into any mold shape (or over any interior
    shapes), at modest temperatures.

    Lots of 'box' items are available for lots of purposes,
    can you get a file-card box or a lunchbox to suit your
    purposes? How about an Altoids tin? Hubcap
    from a '57 Chevy?
     
    whit3rd, Mar 19, 2010
    #10
  11. D Yuniskis

    hamilton Guest

    Dombo wrote:
    > D Yuniskis schreef:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >> enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >> simple rectangular prism shape.
    >>
    >> So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    >> appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    >> the angle is too shallow).

    >
    > Depending on your specific requirements a 3D printer could be an option
    > for plastic enclosures. Companies which offer prototyping services often
    > have one.


    I have seen 3D printer cases that I would not give to a customer.

    Its great for a sales guy showing off a NEW product, but the strength of
    the model is still not what I would expect for a real case.

    hamilton
     
    hamilton, Mar 19, 2010
    #11
  12. D Yuniskis

    D Yuniskis Guest

    whit3rd wrote:
    > On Mar 19, 10:32 am, D Yuniskis <> wrote:
    >
    >> I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >> enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >> simple rectangular prism shape.
    >>
    >> So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    >> appropriate

    >
    > Three ideas: sheetmetal work is fairly easy, if you can
    > find a shop with brakes and shears, they
    > can whip up a variety of flat-surfaced boxy things.
    > Spotwelding or POP rivets or PEM nuts are suitable
    > for the fastenings.
    >
    > Polycarbonate or acrylic sheeting can be heated in an
    > oven to sag into any mold shape (or over any interior
    > shapes), at modest temperatures.


    Ooooh! That's an idea! Much less work than fiberglass,
    too! (though I suspect relying on gravity means you
    need to constrain your "shape" somewhat -- e.g., I imagine
    there are "minimum sag radii" :> )

    > Lots of 'box' items are available for lots of purposes,
    > can you get a file-card box or a lunchbox to suit your
    > purposes? How about an Altoids tin? Hubcap
    > from a '57 Chevy?
     
    D Yuniskis, Mar 19, 2010
    #12
  13. D Yuniskis

    Rich Webb Guest

    On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 12:41:05 -0700, D Yuniskis
    <> wrote:

    >Hi Rich,
    >
    >Rich Webb wrote:
    >> On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 10:32:42 -0700, D Yuniskis
    >>> I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >>> enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >>> simple rectangular prism shape.
    >>>
    >>> So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    >>> appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    >>> the angle is too shallow).

    >>
    >> Some possibles from my bookmarks list:
    >> http://www.polycase.com/
    >> http://www.rose-bopla.com/Main_Pgs/Table_of_Contents.htm
    >> and of course http://www.hammondmfg.com/

    >
    >I had already checked ploycase and hammond -- no joy there.
    >I chased the second link you provided and they don't seem to have
    >anything either.
    >
    >I'm pretty sure I am going to have to roll my own.
    >So, it boils down to figuring out what the limitations
    >of any process I might adopt would be.


    The "how big" question is still out there. A non-rectangular shape could
    also be a pretty big animated head for a carnival float... ;-)

    There are some "craft" approaches, like a papier mache shell over a wire
    armature or a putty build-up over an existing form. Use that as a
    positive to create a negative mold and then a small production run using
    cast resin. http://www.micromark.com/Casting-and-Molding-Supplies.html
    has the supplies to get started.

    Or, talk to the folks at http://www.protomold.com/

    --
    Rich Webb Norfolk, VA
     
    Rich Webb, Mar 19, 2010
    #13
  14. D Yuniskis

    D Yuniskis Guest

    Hi Hans-Bernhard,

    Hans-Bernhard Bröker wrote:
    > D Yuniskis wrote:
    >
    >> I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >> enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >> simple rectangular prism shape.

    >
    > So now we know what you're _not_ looking for. But we don't know what
    > you _are_ looking for. How is anybody supposed to be able to offer
    > meaningful suggestions based on that?


    Apparently, *other* have managed to do so! But, if you
    need more details...

    > What actually is the shape you're trying to get?


    Klein bottle

    > What size?


    3 gills

    > What colour / surface finish?


    Must not reflect any light in the visible specturm

    > How good does it have to look (e.g.: visible screws, tool marks)?


    See above

    > Any requirements about sharp edges / curve radii?


    Yes

    > What's it allowed to weigh?


    < 0.0375 stone

    > How tightly does it have to fit the content?


    tight enough to keep the contents from escaping!

    > What tolerances (i.e. how equal do those 20 units have to be)?


    racial, ethnic and religious

    > What's the budget, both in terms of money and time?


    3 peng, less than a hebdomad

    > What skill level can be expected from the person building it?


    Somewhere between rocket-scientist and cancer-curer

    Does any of this change your potential solution?? :-/
    (If I could boil it down to "X = 2 * 3 + 4 / 5" then
    I wouldn't need to ask for suggestions, would I? :< )
     
    D Yuniskis, Mar 19, 2010
    #14
  15. D Yuniskis

    mpm Guest

    On Mar 19, 12:32 pm, D Yuniskis <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    > enclosures.  But, I'm looking for something other than a
    > simple rectangular prism shape.
    >
    > So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    > appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    > the angle is too shallow).
    >
    > If push comes to shove, I can have a friend mill them
    > out of blocks of aluminum but that seems terribly wasteful!
    >
    > I'm wondering, instead, if I can't hack together something
    > with a sheet metal skeleton (or, maybe even a cardboard or
    > wooden form!) and fiberglass?  This doesn't need to be
    > terribly strong, structurally.  And, I could no doubt
    > come up with a way of mounting everything to a *base*
    > (i.e., to eliminate the need for fasteners *in* the skin).
    >
    > Has anyone done this sort of thing before?  Pointers to
    > helpful tips as well as things to avoid...  :>
    >
    > Thanks!
    > --don


    Have you looked at PacTec Enclosures yet?
    Link: http://www.pactecenclosures.com/

    -mpm
     
    mpm, Mar 19, 2010
    #15
  16. D Yuniskis

    D Yuniskis Guest

    Hi Tim,

    Tim Wescott wrote:
    >>>> I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >>>> enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >>>> simple rectangular prism shape.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm wondering, instead, if I can't hack together something
    >>>> with a sheet metal skeleton (or, maybe even a cardboard or
    >>>> wooden form!) and fiberglass? This doesn't need to be
    >>>> terribly strong, structurally. And, I could no doubt
    >>>> come up with a way of mounting everything to a *base*
    >>>> (i.e., to eliminate the need for fasteners *in* the skin).
    >>>
    >>> I'm not sure what you're thinking of in terms of a "skeleton", but a
    >>> fiberglass enclosure, by itself, would certainly be structurally
    >>> sound enough for anything small.

    >>
    >> The "skeleton" idea would allow me to fasten things to
    >> that skeleton and drape the fiberglass around it.
    >> (i.e., instead of trying to fasten to the fiberglass
    >> itself)
    >>
    >> The other option was to fasten everything to a "base"
    >> and hang the fiberglass shell over that.

    >
    > By "drape" I sincerely hope that you mean "take a cured molded top piece
    > and bolt it to the metal chassis piece".


    Refering to the P in which I used the term, I meant "mold the
    fiberglass around that skeleton". E.g., deliberately design
    the skeleton's shape so that the fiberglass shell "klinged"
    (klung?) to that shell. So, the shell/skeleton could have
    bits fastened *to* it and then *it* fastened to a base.

    In the second P, fasten everything to a base and then
    "place" the fiberglass shell on top of it (so the fiberglass
    is just a cosmetic cover only supporting itself and loosely
    fastened to the rest of the lot)

    > Free-form fiberglass layup can be done, but it's a tremendous amount of
    > work. If you do something like this in fiberglass you want to make a
    > plaster (or wood and Bondo, or wax, etc.) mock-up, then take a mold off
    > of it, then make your fiberglass parts in that mold.


    Yes. Hence my original comment re: wood (machining out of plastic
    would require going the full CNC route whereas you can "eyeball"
    something out of wood)

    >> That's why I came up with the fiberglass-over-skeleton
    >> approach -- let the skeleton (aluminum/sheet metal)
    >> give a basic form and some support for the internals
    >> and then let the fiberglass "sex it up" :-/

    >
    > If you say "fiberglass housing over a metal chassis" then you start
    > making lots of sense. It may not be the best solution, but you're
    > getting into a tolerably wide range of solutions.
    >
    > As asked somewhere else -- how big is this thing?


    "3 gill" :> Figure the volume of two (respectible) fists.
     
    D Yuniskis, Mar 19, 2010
    #16
  17. D Yuniskis

    D Yuniskis Guest

    Hi Rich,

    Rich Webb wrote:
    >> I had already checked ploycase and hammond -- no joy there.
    >> I chased the second link you provided and they don't seem to have
    >> anything either.
    >>
    >> I'm pretty sure I am going to have to roll my own.
    >> So, it boils down to figuring out what the limitations
    >> of any process I might adopt would be.

    >
    > The "how big" question is still out there. A non-rectangular shape could
    > also be a pretty big animated head for a carnival float... ;-)
    >
    > There are some "craft" approaches, like a papier mache shell over a wire
    > armature or a putty build-up over an existing form. Use that as a
    > positive to create a negative mold and then a small production run using
    > cast resin. http://www.micromark.com/Casting-and-Molding-Supplies.html
    > has the supplies to get started.


    Ah, excellent! Thanks!

    > Or, talk to the folks at http://www.protomold.com/


    <frown>
     
    D Yuniskis, Mar 19, 2010
    #17
  18. D Yuniskis

    D Yuniskis Guest

    mpm wrote:
    > On Mar 19, 12:32 pm, D Yuniskis <> wrote:
    >> I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >> enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >> simple rectangular prism shape.
    >>
    >> So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    >> appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    >> the angle is too shallow).

    >
    > Have you looked at PacTec Enclosures yet?
    > Link: http://www.pactecenclosures.com/


    Ah, I had forgotten about them! But, no, they don't have
    anything "stock", either. Everything COTS seems to be
    "a box" -- with only minor deviations on that "rectangular
    prism" theme.
     
    D Yuniskis, Mar 19, 2010
    #18
  19. D Yuniskis

    Fred Abse Guest

    On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 10:32:42 -0700, D Yuniskis wrote:

    > I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    > enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    > simple rectangular prism shape.
    >
    > So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    > appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    > the angle is too shallow).


    Have you looked at OKW?

    http://www.okwenclosures.com


    --
    "Electricity is of two kinds, positive and negative. The difference
    is, I presume, that one comes a little more expensive, but is more
    durable; the other is a cheaper thing, but the moths get into it."
    (Stephen Leacock)
     
    Fred Abse, Mar 19, 2010
    #19
  20. On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 10:32:42 -0700, D Yuniskis
    <> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >I need a small quantity (~20) of small {plastic,aluminum}
    >enclosures. But, I'm looking for something other than a
    >simple rectangular prism shape.
    >
    >So far, I haven't found anything "stock" that looks
    >appropriate (I did find a COTS "console-like" case but
    >the angle is too shallow).
    >
    >If push comes to shove, I can have a friend mill them
    >out of blocks of aluminum but that seems terribly wasteful!
    >
    >I'm wondering, instead, if I can't hack together something
    >with a sheet metal skeleton (or, maybe even a cardboard or
    >wooden form!) and fiberglass? This doesn't need to be
    >terribly strong, structurally. And, I could no doubt
    >come up with a way of mounting everything to a *base*
    >(i.e., to eliminate the need for fasteners *in* the skin).
    >
    >Has anyone done this sort of thing before? Pointers to
    >helpful tips as well as things to avoid... :>
    >



    Try

    http://www.tekoenclosures.com/
    (USA site, actual fabrication in Italy)

    RS Components and Farnell sell some of their enclosures.

    Regards
    Anton Erasmus
     
    Anton Erasmus, Mar 20, 2010
    #20
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