fan hold down bracket on amd cpu board

Discussion in 'Asus' started by irv, Mar 9, 2009.

  1. irv

    irv Guest

    i have to go to a friend's house this week and change out the amd cpu fan
    hold down bracket since one of the tabs broke off and the fan/heatsink is
    loose.

    my friend tells me there are plastic pins viewable from the top.
    what will i find underneat since i need to get the plastic pins out and
    replace the bracket and reuse the pins.
    i am hoping that the bottom of the plastic pin is squeezable and the pin can
    be nudged up.

    am i right?

    thanks
    irv, Mar 9, 2009
    #1
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  2. irv

    Paul Guest

    irv wrote:
    > i have to go to a friend's house this week and change out the amd cpu fan
    > hold down bracket since one of the tabs broke off and the fan/heatsink is
    > loose.
    >
    > my friend tells me there are plastic pins viewable from the top.
    > what will i find underneat since i need to get the plastic pins out and
    > replace the bracket and reuse the pins.
    > i am hoping that the bottom of the plastic pin is squeezable and the pin can
    > be nudged up.
    >
    > am i right?
    >
    > thanks
    >


    Does the motherboard have a model number ? There are pictures around.
    For example, Newegg takes pictures of the front and back of the
    motherboard. A number of Asus boards appear to be using screws and
    a backplate. (I picked a picture of a Gigabyte board, because it
    happened to be a bit clearer.)

    Example of AM2 screws.
    http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-128-383-S03?$S640W$

    Example of AM2 backplate.
    http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-128-383-S04?$S640W$

    Things like the Northbridge, might use a plastic pin that expands
    on the back. Those can be squeezed and pushed out, and reused if
    you're careful. The biggest exposure with those, is the pliers
    slipping and cutting a copper track. There must be a proper tool
    for compressing them, but I haven't seen one.

    As far as replacement goes, a typical scenario is the user has
    an Arctic Cooling CPU cooler, with a three tab clip on each end
    of the mechanism. And the plastic retention bracket has one tab
    and only one tab engages. Since all the forces are now on one
    tab, instead of three, the tab snaps off. If a new plastic retention
    bracket is fitted, there is every chance the same thing will happen
    again. I've seen replacement retention brackets for sale, and they're
    not all designed the same. So it may be possible to find one with
    three tabs, or you could change out the cooler for another design
    style.

    This S939 appears to have two screws.

    http://www.ixbt.com/mainboard/asus/a8n32-sli-deluxe/board.jpg

    Paul
    Paul, Mar 9, 2009
    #2
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  3. irv

    Jim E Guest

    use a flatbed screwdriver to lever out the pins and watch where they go as
    they go flying!

    they can be reused no problem!


    "irv" <> wrote in message
    news:KR0tl.17969$...
    >i have to go to a friend's house this week and change out the amd cpu fan
    >hold down bracket since one of the tabs broke off and the fan/heatsink is
    >loose.
    >
    > my friend tells me there are plastic pins viewable from the top.
    > what will i find underneat since i need to get the plastic pins out and
    > replace the bracket and reuse the pins.
    > i am hoping that the bottom of the plastic pin is squeezable and the pin
    > can be nudged up.
    >
    > am i right?
    >
    > thanks
    >
    Jim E, Mar 9, 2009
    #3
  4. irv

    irv Guest

    actually, i don't think it is an asus board but i figure that most amd
    brackets arte the same.
    except for the one you pointed me to which has actual screws.
    i'll play with it later in the week.

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:gp2lq8$9vi$...
    > irv wrote:
    >> i have to go to a friend's house this week and change out the amd cpu fan
    >> hold down bracket since one of the tabs broke off and the fan/heatsink is
    >> loose.
    >>
    >> my friend tells me there are plastic pins viewable from the top.
    >> what will i find underneat since i need to get the plastic pins out and
    >> replace the bracket and reuse the pins.
    >> i am hoping that the bottom of the plastic pin is squeezable and the pin
    >> can be nudged up.
    >>
    >> am i right?
    >>
    >> thanks

    >
    > Does the motherboard have a model number ? There are pictures around.
    > For example, Newegg takes pictures of the front and back of the
    > motherboard. A number of Asus boards appear to be using screws and
    > a backplate. (I picked a picture of a Gigabyte board, because it
    > happened to be a bit clearer.)
    >
    > Example of AM2 screws.
    > http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-128-383-S03?$S640W$
    >
    > Example of AM2 backplate.
    > http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-128-383-S04?$S640W$
    >
    > Things like the Northbridge, might use a plastic pin that expands
    > on the back. Those can be squeezed and pushed out, and reused if
    > you're careful. The biggest exposure with those, is the pliers
    > slipping and cutting a copper track. There must be a proper tool
    > for compressing them, but I haven't seen one.
    >
    > As far as replacement goes, a typical scenario is the user has
    > an Arctic Cooling CPU cooler, with a three tab clip on each end
    > of the mechanism. And the plastic retention bracket has one tab
    > and only one tab engages. Since all the forces are now on one
    > tab, instead of three, the tab snaps off. If a new plastic retention
    > bracket is fitted, there is every chance the same thing will happen
    > again. I've seen replacement retention brackets for sale, and they're
    > not all designed the same. So it may be possible to find one with
    > three tabs, or you could change out the cooler for another design
    > style.
    >
    > This S939 appears to have two screws.
    >
    > http://www.ixbt.com/mainboard/asus/a8n32-sli-deluxe/board.jpg
    >
    > Paul
    irv, Mar 10, 2009
    #4
  5. irv

    Paul Guest

    irv wrote:
    > actually, i don't think it is an asus board but i figure that most amd
    > brackets arte the same.
    > except for the one you pointed me to which has actual screws.
    > i'll play with it later in the week.
    >


    There are plenty of pictures on Newegg, so before you head over to
    your friend's place, you could easily find a picture of it. Then
    you'll know what tools to bring. If the tab is busted, then you
    still have to find a replacement retention bracket as well, and
    the supply of those will vary (some good replacement kits, no
    longer available etc). A bolt thru kit and new heatsink, is another
    possible solution, depending on how prepared you want to be,
    before visiting your friend. But to do something like that, you'd
    really need to look at the pictures of the motherboard carefully,
    to decide whether a bolt-thru setup would work.

    Thermalright Ultra 120 (see AM2 installation section).
    http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_p...120ex/installation_cpu_cooler_u120ex.html#am2

    Picture showing bolt-thru installation in place for heatsink. No
    retention bracket is used with this cooler. The bolts do the
    job, using the holes already present in the motherboard. Some
    bolt-thru threads can be easily stripped, so you want to
    read the reviews before making a purchase.

    http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_p...r/ultra-120_extreme/installation/image025.jpg

    A separately purchased backplate (if one isn't available), is
    used to take the bolts. A downside with the thermalright stuff,
    is getting all the bits and pieces together.

    http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/am2bowiscsp.html

    When using a backplate, you want to check a picture of the
    back of the motherboard, for any obstructions which might
    prevent a backplate from being used.

    So there are other options, depending on your budget, and
    how cheap/easy it is to visit your friend once or twice. For
    example, if I was doing a repair back home, I'd prep
    everything I needed, before hopping in the car for the
    long drive.

    On my current LGA775 motherboard, I use a bolt-thru heatsink,
    specifically so there would be no plastic in my install. You
    can drop my PC out a second story window - the PC might be
    ruined, but the heatsink will still be clamped to the CPU :)
    It is pretty hard to take apart though, so most people would
    hate the thing. Mine fastens from the back, which is a big
    mistake.

    Paul
    Paul, Mar 10, 2009
    #5
  6. irv

    irv Guest

    Paul

    wow!
    thanks for all the links.
    the pix are certainly intertesting.
    i wonder what hold down bracket is underneath the motherboard.

    i did get a new plastic retention bracket from an ebay vendor.
    i am planning on taking the board out and then removing the plastic pin
    inserts and then the plastic pins and reverse the process using the new
    retention bracket.
    i would rather replace the plastic pins with screws, lock washers and nuts
    but can't figure out what thread/length to get.
    the pictures show a weirdly threaded screw that i couldn't hope to find so i
    will plan on reusing the existing plastic pins.

    the chip was the amd 6000+ which uses a bigger heatsink/fan so i hope the
    new retention bracket is up to the task.

    should be an interesting project.
    very little on this topic on a google search.
    we tried marine epoxy but it didn't hold the first time.
    i don't know if my friend tried it again.
    no other solutions other than changing the retention bracket.

    thanks for the help.
    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:gp4s5j$t8a$...
    > irv wrote:
    >> actually, i don't think it is an asus board but i figure that most amd
    >> brackets are the same.
    >> except for the one you pointed me to which has actual screws.
    >> i'll play with it later in the week.
    >>

    >
    > There are plenty of pictures on Newegg, so before you head over to
    > your friend's place, you could easily find a picture of it. Then
    > you'll know what tools to bring. If the tab is busted, then you
    > still have to find a replacement retention bracket as well, and
    > the supply of those will vary (some good replacement kits, no
    > longer available etc). A bolt thru kit and new heatsink, is another
    > possible solution, depending on how prepared you want to be,
    > before visiting your friend. But to do something like that, you'd
    > really need to look at the pictures of the motherboard carefully,
    > to decide whether a bolt-thru setup would work.
    >
    > Thermalright Ultra 120 (see AM2 installation section).
    > http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_p...120ex/installation_cpu_cooler_u120ex.html#am2
    >
    > Picture showing bolt-thru installation in place for heatsink. No
    > retention bracket is used with this cooler. The bolts do the
    > job, using the holes already present in the motherboard. Some
    > bolt-thru threads can be easily stripped, so you want to
    > read the reviews before making a purchase.
    >
    > http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_p...r/ultra-120_extreme/installation/image025.jpg
    >
    > A separately purchased backplate (if one isn't available), is
    > used to take the bolts. A downside with the thermalright stuff,
    > is getting all the bits and pieces together.
    >
    > http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/am2bowiscsp.html
    >
    > When using a backplate, you want to check a picture of the
    > back of the motherboard, for any obstructions which might
    > prevent a backplate from being used.
    >
    > So there are other options, depending on your budget, and
    > how cheap/easy it is to visit your friend once or twice. For
    > example, if I was doing a repair back home, I'd prep
    > everything I needed, before hopping in the car for the
    > long drive.
    >
    > On my current LGA775 motherboard, I use a bolt-thru heatsink,
    > specifically so there would be no plastic in my install. You
    > can drop my PC out a second story window - the PC might be
    > ruined, but the heatsink will still be clamped to the CPU :)
    > It is pretty hard to take apart though, so most people would
    > hate the thing. Mine fastens from the back, which is a big
    > mistake.
    >
    > Paul
    irv, Mar 10, 2009
    #6
  7. irv

    irv Guest

    so it turned out that the original bracket holes were slightly oblong and
    the new bracket holes were round.
    thus the pins which were oblong would not expand properly when exiting the
    holes in the board and i could not insert the 2nd pin into the middle of the
    1st pin..
    so it was off to home depot where we bought some 12-24 x 3/4" bolts and
    nuts and some reall small lockwashers that barely encircled the nuts.
    i then reassembled everything with lockwashers on top and bottom.
    it was good that i had the lockwashers since the bolts might have shorted
    some traces while the lockwashers were not that big.
    the nuts do not touch the board.

    now, my issue is that after letting the amd cpu temps get so high as to shut
    down the computer on many occasions, the chip new seems to be running hot -
    like in the 50's and 60's which is too warm although still in spec.
    another motherboard i have with the same cpu runs 30-35 degrees so there is
    quite the difference.

    is it possible that overheating the chip several times now means it runs
    hotter on a permanent basis.
    i need to get back to my friend's house and take the thing apart again and
    use some artic silver and perhaps add a front case fan.
    no room for a rear case fan.
    gotta get the temp donw or it will be off to get a new cpu.


    "Jim E" <> wrote in message
    news:3h5tl.23398$2...
    > use a flatbed screwdriver to lever out the pins and watch where they go as
    > they go flying!
    >
    > they can be reused no problem!
    >
    >
    > "irv" <> wrote in message
    > news:KR0tl.17969$...
    >>i have to go to a friend's house this week and change out the amd cpu fan
    >>hold down bracket since one of the tabs broke off and the fan/heatsink is
    >>loose.
    >>
    >> my friend tells me there are plastic pins viewable from the top.
    >> what will i find underneat since i need to get the plastic pins out and
    >> replace the bracket and reuse the pins.
    >> i am hoping that the bottom of the plastic pin is squeezable and the pin
    >> can be nudged up.
    >>
    >> am i right?
    >>
    >> thanks
    >>

    >
    >
    irv, Mar 12, 2009
    #7
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