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Fan replacement made easy...not

Discussion in 'Sun Hardware' started by David Lesher, May 31, 2009.

  1. David Lesher

    David Lesher Guest

    <RANT>

    &%*%^*%^*&

    I had to swap fans in a Enterprise SPARC 250 power supply yesterday.
    It's cleverly designed to make a simple task as hard as possible.

    The module is ~14 long, ~3" deep and ~5" wide. The 80mm fan is at the
    end. It's screwed down to 4 studs coming through the end.

    Now, if they were normal screws; changing it out would be trivial, but oh
    no, that would be too simple. The studs are solidly swedged into the case
    end.

    You can't unbolt the fan and slide it away from the end, the main board
    interferes. So you remove the 6 screws holding it down; but getting to
    #6 means first pulling the line filter. Then you lift the board part way
    out and slide the fan off the studs.

    I wanted to replace the 80mm/1" thick fan with a 1.25" one. There's
    spaceI for it but I needed longer bolts. I finally managed to press out
    the top two swedged studs and used 1.5" long 6/32 machine screws.

    It's all back together, but grrrr...


    </RANT>
    --
    A host is a host from coast to
    & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
    Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
    is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
     
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  2. Steve Firth

    Steve Firth Guest

    David Lesher <> wrote:

    > I had to swap fans in a Enterprise SPARC 250 power supply yesterday.
    > It's cleverly designed to make a simple task as hard as possible.


    Heh, try that in a V20Z then you will learn the power of cursing, and
    the strong desire for supplies of Band-Aid.
     
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  3. In comp.sys.sun.hardware Steve Firth <%steve%@malloc.co.uk> wrote:
    > David Lesher <> wrote:
    >
    >> I had to swap fans in a Enterprise SPARC 250 power supply yesterday.
    >> It's cleverly designed to make a simple task as hard as possible.

    >
    > Heh, try that in a V20Z then you will learn the power of cursing, and
    > the strong desire for supplies of Band-Aid.


    Well, at least they have improved on recent models. For an x4200 I just
    pop open the lid, lift out the problem fan and put in the replacement. All
    this happens while the machine is still running. No tools required.

    Okay, so those are the chassis fans not the PSU ones, but really, much
    imporved over previous machines.

    --
    Dr Tristram J. Scott
    Energy Consultant
     
  4. DoN. Nichols

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2009-06-01, Tristram Scott <> wrote:
    > In comp.sys.sun.hardware Steve Firth <%steve%@malloc.co.uk> wrote:
    >> David Lesher <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I had to swap fans in a Enterprise SPARC 250 power supply yesterday.
    >>> It's cleverly designed to make a simple task as hard as possible.

    >>
    >> Heh, try that in a V20Z then you will learn the power of cursing, and
    >> the strong desire for supplies of Band-Aid.

    >
    > Well, at least they have improved on recent models. For an x4200 I just
    > pop open the lid, lift out the problem fan and put in the replacement. All
    > this happens while the machine is still running. No tools required.


    Hmm ... I should be able to do the same with a Sun Fire 280R, as
    the fan tray plugs in, and the wires which go past it either pass
    through notches on the bottom or are held by spring clips on the sides.
    I learned how they removed when I discovered that to move up to Cu CPUs,
    I would have to upgrade the fan tray -- and I had a spare chassis which
    had the right fan tay. (FWIW, the difference is that the middle fan for
    the later one is 14W instead of 7W, but the fans are three-wire ones so
    the system can monitor the status of the fans, so it is easier to simply
    get the right fan tray if you can.

    And I did not need to swap it under power, because it was not in
    service yet -- just an experimental machine -- on which I learned that
    the last Solaris 10 which I downloaded last year would install on a
    zfs filesystem, which was then easy to expand to a mirrored drive. (I
    did not see a way to specify to make it mirrored when I was building it
    however.)

    > Okay, so those are the chassis fans not the PSU ones, but really, much
    > imporved over previous machines.


    Well ... the PSUs for the 280R are hot swappable, so you can
    pull one out and replace the fan while operating off the other, even if
    you don't have any spare PSUs around. (I do -- now. :)

    Enjoy,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
     
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