Fast User Switching ?

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Norm, Mar 17, 2005.

  1. Norm

    Norm Guest

    This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in Help....

    Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching enabled.

    I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    then the admin must login during startup not via fast user switching.

    Is this correct?

    Thanks.

    <posted to comp.sys.mac.system>

    --
    Please send email to: nwhiii at yahoo dot com
     
    Norm, Mar 17, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Norm

    Zaphod B Guest

    Norm <> wrote:

    > This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in Help....
    >
    > Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching enabled.
    >
    > I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    > then the admin must login during startup not via fast user switching.
    >
    > Is this correct?


    No. IF Admin is logged in, he/she is logged in - no matter how. In
    addition, very often you'll get teh chance to autheticate as Admin when
    requesting an authorized task, even when not being logged in as Admin.
    E.g., when clickinng a padlock icon next to a locked System Preference.

    --
    /Z
     
    Zaphod B, Mar 17, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Norm

    Jeff Wiseman Guest

    Norm wrote:

    > This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in Help....
    >
    > Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching enabled.
    >
    > I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    > then the admin must login during startup not via fast user switching.



    Would you please elaborate on these limited "actions" that
    require the admin to be the first one logged in?

    There was a discussion here earlier about a problem with the
    WindowServer when a standard account logs in before an admin
    account when using fast switching. Your information might be related.


    --
    Jeff Wiseman
    to reply, just remove ALLTHESPAM
     
    Jeff Wiseman, Mar 17, 2005
    #3
  4. Norm

    Norm Guest

    In article <Nlj_d.13208$>,
    Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:

    > Norm wrote:
    >
    > > This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in Help....
    > >
    > > Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching enabled.
    > >
    > > I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    > > then the admin must login during startup not via fast user switching.

    >
    >
    > Would you please elaborate on these limited "actions" that
    > require the admin to be the first one logged in?
    >
    > There was a discussion here earlier about a problem with the
    > WindowServer when a standard account logs in before an admin
    > account when using fast switching. Your information might be related.




    OP responding to question.

    The ones I'm focusing on are changes in System Preferences -> Accounts.

    The Other Accounts are grayed out even if Accounts padlock is open. And
    I believe changes to a managed account were grayed out as well but I've
    since changed that.

    If admin signs in on startup, all changes to Accounts are available but
    were not available when signed in using Fast User Switching.

    Hope I'm explaining that clearly.

    Thanks for the help.

    --
    Please send email to: nwhiii at yahoo dot com
     
    Norm, Mar 17, 2005
    #4
  5. Norm

    Alwyn Guest

    On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 13:38:43 -0500, Norm wrote:

    > In article <Nlj_d.13208$>,
    > Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    >
    >> Norm wrote:
    >>
    >> > This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in Help....
    >> >
    >> > Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching enabled.
    >> >
    >> > I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    >> > then the admin must login during startup not via fast user switching.

    >>
    >>
    >> Would you please elaborate on these limited "actions" that
    >> require the admin to be the first one logged in?
    >>
    >> There was a discussion here earlier about a problem with the
    >> WindowServer when a standard account logs in before an admin
    >> account when using fast switching. Your information might be related.

    >
    >
    >
    > OP responding to question.
    >
    > The ones I'm focusing on are changes in System Preferences -> Accounts.
    >
    > The Other Accounts are grayed out even if Accounts padlock is open. And
    > I believe changes to a managed account were grayed out as well but I've
    > since changed that.
    >
    > If admin signs in on startup, all changes to Accounts are available but
    > were not available when signed in using Fast User Switching.


    You cannot modify other people's accounts while they are still logged in.
    If you want to make changes, first make sure the accounts you want to
    change are logged out.


    Alwyn
     
    Alwyn, Mar 17, 2005
    #5
  6. Norm

    Norm Guest

    In article <>,
    Alwyn <> wrote:

    > On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 13:38:43 -0500, Norm wrote:
    >
    > > In article <Nlj_d.13208$>,
    > > Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Norm wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in Help....
    > >> >
    > >> > Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching enabled.
    > >> >
    > >> > I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    > >> > then the admin must login during startup not via fast user switching.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Would you please elaborate on these limited "actions" that
    > >> require the admin to be the first one logged in?
    > >>
    > >> There was a discussion here earlier about a problem with the
    > >> WindowServer when a standard account logs in before an admin
    > >> account when using fast switching. Your information might be related.

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > OP responding to question.
    > >
    > > The ones I'm focusing on are changes in System Preferences -> Accounts.
    > >
    > > The Other Accounts are grayed out even if Accounts padlock is open. And
    > > I believe changes to a managed account were grayed out as well but I've
    > > since changed that.
    > >
    > > If admin signs in on startup, all changes to Accounts are available but
    > > were not available when signed in using Fast User Switching.

    >
    > You cannot modify other people's accounts while they are still logged in.
    > If you want to make changes, first make sure the accounts you want to
    > change are logged out.
    >
    >
    > Alwyn


    OP....

    Aha....I may have very well have had the other user logged in when I
    went to System Preferences->Accounts. So that would explain the grayed
    out and not the way I logged in.

    Thanks for that tip....to this beginner. I appreciate.

    --
    Please send email to: nwhiii at yahoo dot com
     
    Norm, Mar 17, 2005
    #6
  7. Norm

    Jeff Wiseman Guest

    Norm wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Alwyn <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 13:38:43 -0500, Norm wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>In article <Nlj_d.13208$>,
    >>> Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Norm wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in Help....
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching enabled.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    >>>>>then the admin must login during startup not via fast user switching.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Would you please elaborate on these limited "actions" that
    >>>>require the admin to be the first one logged in?
    >>>>
    >>>>There was a discussion here earlier about a problem with the
    >>>>WindowServer when a standard account logs in before an admin
    >>>>account when using fast switching. Your information might be related.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>OP responding to question.
    >>>
    >>>The ones I'm focusing on are changes in System Preferences -> Accounts.
    >>>
    >>>The Other Accounts are grayed out even if Accounts padlock is open. And
    >>>I believe changes to a managed account were grayed out as well but I've
    >>>since changed that.
    >>>
    >>>If admin signs in on startup, all changes to Accounts are available but
    >>>were not available when signed in using Fast User Switching.

    >>
    >>You cannot modify other people's accounts while they are still logged in.
    >>If you want to make changes, first make sure the accounts you want to
    >>change are logged out.
    >>
    >>
    >>Alwyn

    >
    >
    > OP....
    >
    > Aha....I may have very well have had the other user logged in when I
    > went to System Preferences->Accounts. So that would explain the grayed
    > out and not the way I logged in.
    >
    > Thanks for that tip....to this beginner. I appreciate.



    It sounds like you're on the right track but please try it out
    and if it still behaves unexpectedly, let us know.


    --
    Jeff Wiseman
    to reply, just remove ALLTHESPAM
     
    Jeff Wiseman, Mar 17, 2005
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    Norm <> wrote:

    > The Other Accounts are grayed out even if Accounts padlock is open.
    > And I believe changes to a managed account were grayed out as well
    > but I've since changed that.
    >
    > If admin signs in on startup, all changes to Accounts are available
    > but were not available when signed in using Fast User Switching.


    You can't manage an account that is logged in. So, with only two
    accounts, you can't manage the other account by fast user switching
    because the other account is logged in.

    If there were three accounts and one of them was not logged in, you
    could manage that one by fast user switching.

    --
    Stop Mad Cowboy Disease: Impeach the son of a Bush.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Mar 18, 2005
    #8
  9. In article <Rfn_d.13333$>,
    Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:

    > Norm wrote:
    > > In article <>,
    > > Alwyn <> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 13:38:43 -0500, Norm wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>In article <Nlj_d.13208$>,
    > >>> Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>Norm wrote:
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>>>This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in Help....
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching enabled.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    > >>>>>then the admin must login during startup not via fast user switching.
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Would you please elaborate on these limited "actions" that
    > >>>>require the admin to be the first one logged in?
    > >>>>
    > >>>>There was a discussion here earlier about a problem with the
    > >>>>WindowServer when a standard account logs in before an admin
    > >>>>account when using fast switching. Your information might be related.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>OP responding to question.
    > >>>
    > >>>The ones I'm focusing on are changes in System Preferences -> Accounts.
    > >>>
    > >>>The Other Accounts are grayed out even if Accounts padlock is open. And
    > >>>I believe changes to a managed account were grayed out as well but I've
    > >>>since changed that.
    > >>>
    > >>>If admin signs in on startup, all changes to Accounts are available but
    > >>>were not available when signed in using Fast User Switching.
    > >>
    > >>You cannot modify other people's accounts while they are still logged in.
    > >>If you want to make changes, first make sure the accounts you want to
    > >>change are logged out.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>Alwyn

    > >
    > >
    > > OP....
    > >
    > > Aha....I may have very well have had the other user logged in when I
    > > went to System Preferences->Accounts. So that would explain the grayed
    > > out and not the way I logged in.
    > >
    > > Thanks for that tip....to this beginner. I appreciate.

    >
    >
    > It sounds like you're on the right track but please try it out
    > and if it still behaves unexpectedly, let us know.


    I went through this, early on in OS the tenth experience. I wish they
    had _documented_ that you cannot manage a logged in account. I went to
    help and that was no help.

    --
    Guns don't kill people; automobiles kill people.
     
    Walter Bushell, Apr 7, 2005
    #9
  10. Norm

    Jeff Wiseman Guest

    Walter Bushell wrote:

    > In article <Rfn_d.13333$>,
    > Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Norm wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <>,
    >>> Alwyn <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 13:38:43 -0500, Norm wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>In article <Nlj_d.13208$>,
    >>>>>Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Norm wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in Help....
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching enabled.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    >>>>>>>then the admin must login during startup not via fast user switching.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Would you please elaborate on these limited "actions" that
    >>>>>>require the admin to be the first one logged in?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>There was a discussion here earlier about a problem with the
    >>>>>>WindowServer when a standard account logs in before an admin
    >>>>>>account when using fast switching. Your information might be related.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>OP responding to question.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The ones I'm focusing on are changes in System Preferences -> Accounts.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The Other Accounts are grayed out even if Accounts padlock is open. And
    >>>>>I believe changes to a managed account were grayed out as well but I've
    >>>>>since changed that.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>If admin signs in on startup, all changes to Accounts are available but
    >>>>>were not available when signed in using Fast User Switching.
    >>>>
    >>>>You cannot modify other people's accounts while they are still logged in.
    >>>>If you want to make changes, first make sure the accounts you want to
    >>>>change are logged out.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Alwyn
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>OP....
    >>>
    >>>Aha....I may have very well have had the other user logged in when I
    >>>went to System Preferences->Accounts. So that would explain the grayed
    >>>out and not the way I logged in.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks for that tip....to this beginner. I appreciate.

    >>
    >>
    >>It sounds like you're on the right track but please try it out
    >>and if it still behaves unexpectedly, let us know.

    >
    >
    > I went through this, early on in OS the tenth experience. I wish they
    > had _documented_ that you cannot manage a logged in account. I went to
    > help and that was no help.


    One thing that I have begun doing that helps me is to realize
    that although, I have seen item's greyed out because of bugs or
    system foul-ups, it has been extremely rare.

    ANYTIME something is greyed-out, it means that something
    somewhere else is configured in such a way that that item is
    either irrelevent or more likely illegal. In other words: There
    is a logical reason why this is greyed out and I cannot change
    it. I just haven't discovered that reason yet. However, it WILL
    make sense when I discover it and when I discover it, it will be
    somewhere else and NOT where I am looking at that moment :)

    The real problem is that as has been mentioned, the Help
    documentation on the OS X system is really poorly structured. I
    should be able to go into ANY configuration window, ask for help,
    and have a description of EACH button and field in that window
    and what it does.




    --
    Jeff Wiseman
    to reply, just remove ALLTHESPAM
     
    Jeff Wiseman, Apr 7, 2005
    #10
  11. In article <DH_4e.1933$>,
    Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:

    > Walter Bushell wrote:
    >
    > > In article <Rfn_d.13333$>,
    > > Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Norm wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>In article <>,
    > >>> Alwyn <> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>>On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 13:38:43 -0500, Norm wrote:
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>>>In article <Nlj_d.13208$>,
    > >>>>>Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>>Norm wrote:
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>>>This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in Help....
    > >>>>>>>
    > >>>>>>>Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching enabled.
    > >>>>>>>
    > >>>>>>>I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    > >>>>>>>then the admin must login during startup not via fast user switching.
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>>Would you please elaborate on these limited "actions" that
    > >>>>>>require the admin to be the first one logged in?
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>>There was a discussion here earlier about a problem with the
    > >>>>>>WindowServer when a standard account logs in before an admin
    > >>>>>>account when using fast switching. Your information might be related.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>OP responding to question.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>The ones I'm focusing on are changes in System Preferences -> Accounts.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>The Other Accounts are grayed out even if Accounts padlock is open. And
    > >>>>>I believe changes to a managed account were grayed out as well but I've
    > >>>>>since changed that.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>>If admin signs in on startup, all changes to Accounts are available but
    > >>>>>were not available when signed in using Fast User Switching.
    > >>>>
    > >>>>You cannot modify other people's accounts while they are still logged in.
    > >>>>If you want to make changes, first make sure the accounts you want to
    > >>>>change are logged out.
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Alwyn
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>>OP....
    > >>>
    > >>>Aha....I may have very well have had the other user logged in when I
    > >>>went to System Preferences->Accounts. So that would explain the grayed
    > >>>out and not the way I logged in.
    > >>>
    > >>>Thanks for that tip....to this beginner. I appreciate.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>It sounds like you're on the right track but please try it out
    > >>and if it still behaves unexpectedly, let us know.

    > >
    > >
    > > I went through this, early on in OS the tenth experience. I wish they
    > > had _documented_ that you cannot manage a logged in account. I went to
    > > help and that was no help.

    >
    > One thing that I have begun doing that helps me is to realize
    > that although, I have seen item's greyed out because of bugs or
    > system foul-ups, it has been extremely rare.
    >
    > ANYTIME something is greyed-out, it means that something
    > somewhere else is configured in such a way that that item is
    > either irrelevent or more likely illegal. In other words: There
    > is a logical reason why this is greyed out and I cannot change
    > it. I just haven't discovered that reason yet. However, it WILL
    > make sense when I discover it and when I discover it, it will be
    > somewhere else and NOT where I am looking at that moment :)
    >
    > The real problem is that as has been mentioned, the Help
    > documentation on the OS X system is really poorly structured. I
    > should be able to go into ANY configuration window, ask for help,
    > and have a description of EACH button and field in that window
    > and what it does.


    We had a facility on OS the ninth that did that. It was called balloons.
    Few developers used it, although it was a good idea.

    --
    Guns don't kill people; automobiles kill people.
     
    Walter Bushell, Apr 7, 2005
    #11
  12. In article <>,
    Troubled Tony <> wrote:

    > Walter Bushell <> wrote:
    > > Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    > > > Norm wrote:
    > > > >Alwyn <> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > >>You cannot modify other people's accounts while they are still logged
    > > > >>in.
    > > > >>If you want to make changes, first make sure the accounts you want to
    > > > >>change are logged out.
    > > > >
    > > > > Aha....I may have very well have had the other user logged in when I
    > > > > went to System Preferences->Accounts. So that would explain the
    > > > > grayed
    > > > > out and not the way I logged in.
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanks for that tip....to this beginner. I appreciate.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > It sounds like you're on the right track but please try it out
    > > > and if it still behaves unexpectedly, let us know.

    > >
    > > I went through this, early on in OS the tenth experience. I wish they
    > > had _documented_ that you cannot manage a logged in account. I went to
    > > help and that was no help.

    >
    > Unix has always worked that way. All of 'em.


    That would be a good excuse, if Apple told people they _needed_ a
    background in Unix administration to use the Mac.

    --
    Guns don't kill people; automobiles kill people.
     
    Walter Bushell, Apr 7, 2005
    #12
  13. Norm

    Henry Flam Guest

    In article <>,
    Walter Bushell <> wrote:

    > In article <DH_4e.1933$>,
    > Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    >
    > > Walter Bushell wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <Rfn_d.13333$>,
    > > > Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >>Norm wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >>>In article <>,
    > > >>> Alwyn <> wrote:
    > > >>>
    > > >>>
    > > >>>
    > > >>>>On Thu, 17 Mar 2005 13:38:43 -0500, Norm wrote:
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>>In article <Nlj_d.13208$>,
    > > >>>>>Jeff Wiseman <abuse@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>>>Norm wrote:
    > > >>>>>>
    > > >>>>>>
    > > >>>>>>
    > > >>>>>>>This is a beginner question that I couldn't find answer to in
    > > >>>>>>>Help....
    > > >>>>>>>
    > > >>>>>>>Using OS X 10.3.5 and have two users and fast user switching
    > > >>>>>>>enabled.
    > > >>>>>>>
    > > >>>>>>>I just noticed that if there are actions that only the admin can do,
    > > >>>>>>>then the admin must login during startup not via fast user
    > > >>>>>>>switching.
    > > >>>>>>
    > > >>>>>>
    > > >>>>>>Would you please elaborate on these limited "actions" that
    > > >>>>>>require the admin to be the first one logged in?
    > > >>>>>>
    > > >>>>>>There was a discussion here earlier about a problem with the
    > > >>>>>>WindowServer when a standard account logs in before an admin
    > > >>>>>>account when using fast switching. Your information might be related.
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>>OP responding to question.
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>>The ones I'm focusing on are changes in System Preferences ->
    > > >>>>>Accounts.
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>>The Other Accounts are grayed out even if Accounts padlock is open.
    > > >>>>>And
    > > >>>>>I believe changes to a managed account were grayed out as well but
    > > >>>>>I've
    > > >>>>>since changed that.
    > > >>>>>
    > > >>>>>If admin signs in on startup, all changes to Accounts are available
    > > >>>>>but
    > > >>>>>were not available when signed in using Fast User Switching.
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>You cannot modify other people's accounts while they are still logged
    > > >>>>in.
    > > >>>>If you want to make changes, first make sure the accounts you want to
    > > >>>>change are logged out.
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>
    > > >>>>Alwyn
    > > >>>
    > > >>>
    > > >>>OP....
    > > >>>
    > > >>>Aha....I may have very well have had the other user logged in when I
    > > >>>went to System Preferences->Accounts. So that would explain the grayed
    > > >>>out and not the way I logged in.
    > > >>>
    > > >>>Thanks for that tip....to this beginner. I appreciate.
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >>It sounds like you're on the right track but please try it out
    > > >>and if it still behaves unexpectedly, let us know.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > I went through this, early on in OS the tenth experience. I wish they
    > > > had _documented_ that you cannot manage a logged in account. I went to
    > > > help and that was no help.

    > >
    > > One thing that I have begun doing that helps me is to realize
    > > that although, I have seen item's greyed out because of bugs or
    > > system foul-ups, it has been extremely rare.
    > >
    > > ANYTIME something is greyed-out, it means that something
    > > somewhere else is configured in such a way that that item is
    > > either irrelevent or more likely illegal. In other words: There
    > > is a logical reason why this is greyed out and I cannot change
    > > it. I just haven't discovered that reason yet. However, it WILL
    > > make sense when I discover it and when I discover it, it will be
    > > somewhere else and NOT where I am looking at that moment :)
    > >
    > > The real problem is that as has been mentioned, the Help
    > > documentation on the OS X system is really poorly structured. I
    > > should be able to go into ANY configuration window, ask for help,
    > > and have a description of EACH button and field in that window
    > > and what it does.

    >
    > We had a facility on OS the ninth that did that. It was called balloons.
    > Few developers used it, although it was a good idea.


    Balloon Help was an interesting idea, but unfortunately, the way it was
    implemented, it was annoying because the balloon always got in the way.
    Eventually I turned it off.
     
    Henry Flam, Apr 7, 2005
    #13
  14. Norm

    Simon Slavin Guest

    On 07/04/2005, Walter Bushell wrote in message <proto-
    >:

    > We had a facility on OS the ninth that did that. It was called balloons.
    > Few developers used it, although it was a good idea.


    There is a direct equivalent in OS X, called ToolTips. Instead
    of having to turn it on or off, you just hover the mouse cursor
    over a GUI widget. However, just as with balloon help, it's
    not implemented for everything.

    Simon.
    --
    Using pre-release version of newsreader.
    Please tell me if it does weird things.
     
    Simon Slavin, Apr 9, 2005
    #14
    1. Advertising

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