Getting old Compaq 5100 to work. Please help

Discussion in 'Compaq' started by Paul, Oct 20, 2003.

  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Hi all,

    I have just obtained a very old computer that was previously used in a
    university lab. I have several questions about it. I have trawled
    postings here, but I am still very confused about the computer and its
    behaviour.

    a) The computers' exterior panel reads Compaq Deskpro 5100. Does this
    mean that the computer is a Deskpro 4000 5100? I am trying to download
    software/drivers for this my computer, but this is the closest match I
    can get to on the Compaq website.

    b) If the model is correct, then which software (in the Compaq
    website) should I download for the setup/diagnostic program that so
    many posts have been talking about?
    The link that I use is:
    http://h18007.www1.hp.com/support/files/deskpro/us/locate/4_74.html

    c) I tried downloading the software "Computer Setup/VP and PC
    Diagnostics" but that only creates a single diskette. Some posts have
    state that the Setup/Diagnostic program should have created 3
    diskettes. Am I downloading the wrong package?

    d) The computer came with a VxWorks O/S and it boots off the Ethernet
    network. So, I have detached the HDD and plug it into another
    computer, before wiping the whole drive and creating a single
    partition. Then I formatted the HDD to FAT32 and inserted Windows
    system files into it. When I have re-attached the HDD to the Compaq
    computer, I could not boot off either the floppy or the HDD. What is
    wrong?

    e) To try booting the machine (after performing step (d)), I have
    created both an MS-DOS(Windows) and Setup/Diagnostic (mentioned in
    (c)) boot disks. Both refuse to boot. I try booting them using F10
    after then memory check, and then the standard 2 beeps. All that
    happens is the floppy gets reads twice, briefly, before and after the
    2 beeps. After that, I get the error:
    "Non-system disk or disk error, please insert the correct disk and
    press any key"
    I think it is trying to read off the HDD here?

    f) Should I try to jumper the HDD to slave to force the floppy to
    boot?

    Thank you very much in advance for ANY pointers/clues.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Oct 20, 2003
    #1
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  2. Paul

    Mike Calkins Guest

    For a better answer, post the serial number of the machine. That'd tell
    some of us, what you have..

    Mike in Houston


    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have just obtained a very old computer that was previously used in a
    > university lab. I have several questions about it. I have trawled
    > postings here, but I am still very confused about the computer and its
    > behaviour.
    >
    > a) The computers' exterior panel reads Compaq Deskpro 5100. Does this
    > mean that the computer is a Deskpro 4000 5100? I am trying to download
    > software/drivers for this my computer, but this is the closest match I
    > can get to on the Compaq website.
    >
    > b) If the model is correct, then which software (in the Compaq
    > website) should I download for the setup/diagnostic program that so
    > many posts have been talking about?
    > The link that I use is:
    > http://h18007.www1.hp.com/support/files/deskpro/us/locate/4_74.html
    >
    > c) I tried downloading the software "Computer Setup/VP and PC
    > Diagnostics" but that only creates a single diskette. Some posts have
    > state that the Setup/Diagnostic program should have created 3
    > diskettes. Am I downloading the wrong package?
    >
    > d) The computer came with a VxWorks O/S and it boots off the Ethernet
    > network. So, I have detached the HDD and plug it into another
    > computer, before wiping the whole drive and creating a single
    > partition. Then I formatted the HDD to FAT32 and inserted Windows
    > system files into it. When I have re-attached the HDD to the Compaq
    > computer, I could not boot off either the floppy or the HDD. What is
    > wrong?
    >
    > e) To try booting the machine (after performing step (d)), I have
    > created both an MS-DOS(Windows) and Setup/Diagnostic (mentioned in
    > (c)) boot disks. Both refuse to boot. I try booting them using F10
    > after then memory check, and then the standard 2 beeps. All that
    > happens is the floppy gets reads twice, briefly, before and after the
    > 2 beeps. After that, I get the error:
    > "Non-system disk or disk error, please insert the correct disk and
    > press any key"
    > I think it is trying to read off the HDD here?
    >
    > f) Should I try to jumper the HDD to slave to force the floppy to
    > boot?
    >
    > Thank you very much in advance for ANY pointers/clues.
    >
    > Paul
     
    Mike Calkins, Oct 20, 2003
    #2
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  3. Paul

    Paul Guest

    "Mike Calkins" <> wrote in message news:<hyRkb.648$>...
    > For a better answer, post the serial number of the machine. That'd tell
    > some of us, what you have..
    >
    > Mike in Houston
    >


    Hi,

    Um... I dont know which number is the serial number. Seems to have
    numbers pasted all over the internal/external of the machine.

    Any help here?

    Paul
     
    Paul, Oct 20, 2003
    #3
  4. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Hi,

    I seem to have found the number, not really sure if it is the one..
    8546HSI(1?)70767

    Regards,
    Paul

    (Paul) wrote in message news:<>...
    > "Mike Calkins" <> wrote in message news:<hyRkb.648$>...
    > > For a better answer, post the serial number of the machine. That'd tell
    > > some of us, what you have..
    > >
    > > Mike in Houston
    > >

    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > Um... I dont know which number is the serial number. Seems to have
    > numbers pasted all over the internal/external of the machine.
    >
    > Any help here?
    >
    > Paul
     
    Paul, Oct 21, 2003
    #4
  5. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Hi,

    Can anyone help on this matter? Please see thread. I dont want to clog
    up the newsgroup by reposting.

    Thanks!
    Paul

    (Paul) wrote in message news:<>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I seem to have found the number, not really sure if it is the one..
    > 8546HSI(1?)70767
    >
    > Regards,
    > Paul
    >
    > (Paul) wrote in message news:<>...
    > > "Mike Calkins" <> wrote in message news:<hyRkb.648$>...
    > > > For a better answer, post the serial number of the machine. That'd tell
    > > > some of us, what you have..
    > > >
    > > > Mike in Houston
    > > >

    > >
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > Um... I dont know which number is the serial number. Seems to have
    > > numbers pasted all over the internal/external of the machine.
    > >
    > > Any help here?
    > >
    > > Paul
     
    Paul, Oct 22, 2003
    #5
  6. Paul

    Frank Guest

    "|
    | (Paul) wrote in message
    news:<>...
    |
    | > (Paul) wrote in message
    news:<>...
    | > > "Mike Calkins" <> wrote in message
    news:<hyRkb.648$>...

    Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    | Hi,
    |
    | Can anyone help on this matter? Please see thread. I don't want to
    clog
    | up the newsgroup by reposting.
    |
    | Thanks!
    | Paul

    Just go to their support page and it will autoprobe your PC.
    They will let you know exactly what you have.
     
    Frank, Oct 23, 2003
    #6
  7. Paul

    Frank Guest

    "Frank" <> wrote in message
    news:uZIlb.22704$...
    |
    | "|
    | | (Paul) wrote in message
    | news:<>...
    | |
    | | > (Paul) wrote in message
    | news:<>...
    | | > > "Mike Calkins" <> wrote in message
    | news:<hyRkb.648$>...
    |
    | Paul" <> wrote in message
    | news:...
    | | Hi,
    | |
    | | Can anyone help on this matter? Please see thread. I don't want to
    | clog
    | | up the newsgroup by reposting.
    | |
    | | Thanks!
    | | Paul
    |
    | Just go to their support page and it will autoprobe your PC.
    | They will let you know exactly what you have.

    As an after thought, here is the URL
    http://h71025.www7.hp.com/support/parts/hwlookup.asp
     
    Frank, Oct 23, 2003
    #7
  8. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Hi,

    Just an update. I have typed in the serial number and got the model as
    "Deskpro DT4 5100". Getting to the right webpage that has _available_
    support files is a pain but I got there.

    I tried running the boot disk created using SP8447 but still the
    computer refuses to boot into the floppy.

    I am wondering if the BIOS has been set to NOT boot from floppy. Now
    that the bootable partition is gone, therefore I cannot re-configure
    the BIOS and the computer wont be able to boot into either the floppy
    or the setup partition.

    So the question is whether this computer is recoverable i.e. make to
    boot properly? Should I try formatting the HDD to DOS mode and
    'sys'-ing it ?

    Thanks. Any pointers would help,
    Paul

    "Frank" <> wrote in message news:<R3Jlb.22742$>...
    > "Frank" <> wrote in message
    > news:uZIlb.22704$...
    > |
    > | "|
    > | | (Paul) wrote in message
    > news:<>...
    > | |
    > | | > (Paul) wrote in message
    > news:<>...
    > | | > > "Mike Calkins" <> wrote in message
    > | news:<hyRkb.648$>...
    > |
    > | Paul" <> wrote in message
    > | news:...
    > | | Hi,
    > | |
    > | | Can anyone help on this matter? Please see thread. I don't want to
    > clog
    > | | up the newsgroup by reposting.
    > | |
    > | | Thanks!
    > | | Paul
    > |
    > | Just go to their support page and it will autoprobe your PC.
    > | They will let you know exactly what you have.
    >
    > As an after thought, here is the URL
    > http://h71025.www7.hp.com/support/parts/hwlookup.asp
     
    Paul, Oct 27, 2003
    #8
  9. Paul

    Rick Guest

    Paul wrote:
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > Just an update. I have typed in the serial number and got the model as
    > "Deskpro DT4 5100". Getting to the right webpage that has _available_
    > support files is a pain but I got there.
    >
    > I tried running the boot disk created using SP8447 but still the
    > computer refuses to boot into the floppy.


    What, if any, messages are you getting when you try to boot from the
    floppy disk?

    > I am wondering if the BIOS has been set to NOT boot from floppy. Now
    > that the bootable partition is gone, therefore I cannot re-configure
    > the BIOS and the computer wont be able to boot into either the floppy
    > or the setup partition.
    >
    > So the question is whether this computer is recoverable i.e. make to
    > boot properly? Should I try formatting the HDD to DOS mode and
    > 'sys'-ing it ?
    >
    > Thanks. Any pointers would help,
    > Paul
    >
    > "Frank" <> wrote in message news:<R3Jlb.22742$>...
    > > "Frank" <> wrote in message
    > > news:uZIlb.22704$...
    > > |
    > > | "|
    > > | | (Paul) wrote in message
    > > news:<>...
    > > | |
    > > | | > (Paul) wrote in message
    > > news:<>...
    > > | | > > "Mike Calkins" <> wrote in message
    > > | news:<hyRkb.648$>...
    > > |
    > > | Paul" <> wrote in message
    > > | news:...
    > > | | Hi,
    > > | |
    > > | | Can anyone help on this matter? Please see thread. I don't want to
    > > clog
    > > | | up the newsgroup by reposting.
    > > | |
    > > | | Thanks!
    > > | | Paul
    > > |
    > > | Just go to their support page and it will autoprobe your PC.
    > > | They will let you know exactly what you have.
    > >
    > > As an after thought, here is the URL
    > > http://h71025.www7.hp.com/support/parts/hwlookup.asp
     
    Rick, Oct 27, 2003
    #9
  10. Paul

    DEJ57 Guest

    >I am wondering if the BIOS has been set to NOT boot from floppy. Now
    >that the bootable partition is gone, therefore I cannot re-configure
    >the BIOS and the computer wont be able to boot into either the floppy
    >or the setup partition.



    A CMOS reset would return the unit to default settings, which would be boot
    first to FDD---right? Good luck!

    Dale
     
    DEJ57, Oct 27, 2003
    #10
  11. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Hi,

    When I tried to boot from floppy, the PC reads the floppy, twice
    briefly, before giving me the error:

    Non-system disk or disk error.

    This happens regardless how many times I push the F10 button. I even
    tried using a Windows boot floppy.

    Regarding the CMOS reset: My understanding is that I have to remove
    the battery from the motherboard in order to reset the CMOS. The
    battery seems to be fixed quite securely to the motherboard and
    certainly not removable by hand. I have not tried using a screwdriver,
    but I will certainly try it sometime if the boot floppy will not work.

    Thanks for any advice,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Oct 29, 2003
    #11
  12. Paul

    DEJ57 Guest

    >

    >
    >Regarding the CMOS reset: My understanding is that I have to remove
    >the battery from the motherboard in order to reset the CMOS. The
    >battery seems to be fixed quite securely to the motherboard and
    >certainly not removable by hand. I have not tried using a screwdriver,
    >but I will certainly try it sometime if the boot floppy will not work.


    Some CMOS batteries are soldered onto the systemboard (only God and Compaq know
    why). Should be jumper pins somewhere on the board, with a jumper in place,
    that controls the flow of current to the CMOS from the battery, and is also the
    connection point for an aux battery to attach to and power the CMOS when the
    onboard battery goes dead.

    Dale
     
    DEJ57, Oct 29, 2003
    #12
  13. Batteries were once soldered on boards because at the time the only
    batteries that could do the job were of a type that required it and computer
    designers were not concerned with this issue much. With the boom in
    personal computers and improvements in battery technology created the simple
    to install ones we use today. That is why they came up with the auxiliary
    batteries to allow you to supplement a computer with a dead soldered on
    battery. Computer techs used to have to unsolder the old batteries and then
    solder on a new one. Not to hard on a single layer board of that era, the
    devil to do on the new boards of today.

    Now you, God, Compaq (and all of the other mother board manufacturers of
    that era), and all the readers of this forum know why.

    KC

    "DEJ57" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >

    >
    > >
    > >Regarding the CMOS reset: My understanding is that I have to remove
    > >the battery from the motherboard in order to reset the CMOS. The
    > >battery seems to be fixed quite securely to the motherboard and
    > >certainly not removable by hand. I have not tried using a screwdriver,
    > >but I will certainly try it sometime if the boot floppy will not work.

    >
    > Some CMOS batteries are soldered onto the systemboard (only God and Compaq

    know
    > why). Should be jumper pins somewhere on the board, with a jumper in

    place,
    > that controls the flow of current to the CMOS from the battery, and is

    also the
    > connection point for an aux battery to attach to and power the CMOS when

    the
    > onboard battery goes dead.
    >
    > Dale
     
    Kevin Childers, Oct 29, 2003
    #13
  14. Paul

    DEJ57 Guest

    >
    > Batteries were once soldered on boards because at the time the only
    >batteries that could do the job were of a type that required it and computer
    >designers were not concerned with this issue much. With the boom in
    >personal computers and improvements in battery technology created the simple
    >to install ones we use today. That is why they came up with the auxiliary
    >batteries to allow you to supplement a computer with a dead soldered on
    >battery. Computer techs used to have to unsolder the old batteries and then
    >solder on a new one. Not to hard on a single layer board of that era, the
    >devil to do on the new boards of today.
    >
    > Now you, God, Compaq (and all of the other mother board manufacturers of
    >that era), and all the readers of this forum know why.
    >
    >KC


    Well, that sounds good--but doesn't seem to mesh with my limited experience.
    Maybe that theory holds for other clones but not Compaqs? Older pre-1996
    Comapaq PCs I've worked on didn't have soldered on batteries, but had attached
    by wire CMOS batteries. Of two Compaqs I owned from 1996, the slightly newer
    one was soldered on, and the older did not (disk battery in holder/socket).
    But both used practically the same 3 volt battery, except the soldered on one's
    model number was like one digit different than the other, and had extensions on
    it for the solder points. But it was the basically the same battery. Older
    386 and 486 Compaq laptops I worked on had the same disk batteries in holders,
    not soldered on. Sorry, I don't see the thyme and reason that you do in the
    way this issue has been handled by Compaq over the years. Guess I'm just
    missing the method in the madness....

    Well, if a tech has to solder the batteries off and on, or you have to buy a
    $25 aux battery rather than the user to be able to replace a $3 3 volt disk
    battery--maybe thats the wisdom from Compaqs part. Maybe a soldered on is
    cheaper than a battery in a holder?

    Dale
     
    DEJ57, Oct 29, 2003
    #14
  15. "DEJ57" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >
    > > Batteries were once soldered on boards because at the time the only
    > >batteries that could do the job were of a type that required it and

    computer
    > >designers were not concerned with this issue much. With the boom in
    > >personal computers and improvements in battery technology created the

    simple
    > >to install ones we use today. That is why they came up with the

    auxiliary
    > >batteries to allow you to supplement a computer with a dead soldered on
    > >battery. Computer techs used to have to unsolder the old batteries and

    then
    > >solder on a new one. Not to hard on a single layer board of that era,

    the
    > >devil to do on the new boards of today.
    > >
    > > Now you, God, Compaq (and all of the other mother board manufacturers

    of
    > >that era), and all the readers of this forum know why.
    > >
    > >KC

    >
    > Well, that sounds good--but doesn't seem to mesh with my limited

    experience.
    > Maybe that theory holds for other clones but not Compaqs? Older pre-1996
    > Comapaq PCs I've worked on didn't have soldered on batteries, but had

    attached
    > by wire CMOS batteries. Of two Compaqs I owned from 1996, the slightly

    newer
    > one was soldered on, and the older did not (disk battery in

    holder/socket).
    > But both used practically the same 3 volt battery, except the soldered on

    one's
    > model number was like one digit different than the other, and had

    extensions on
    > it for the solder points. But it was the basically the same battery.

    Older
    > 386 and 486 Compaq laptops I worked on had the same disk batteries in

    holders,
    > not soldered on. Sorry, I don't see the thyme and reason that you do in

    the
    > way this issue has been handled by Compaq over the years. Guess I'm just
    > missing the method in the madness....


    The wired on batteries were an alternetive not seen much outside of
    Compaqs that I know of. I should have mentioned that the majority of my
    experience has been with non-Compaq machines. The lates and greatest
    battery solution is the socketed NiCAD or lithium battery. Actually when
    the change came to the socket, you could occasionally find a board that had
    the socket, but all documentation would still show the old soldered battery.
    Cost wise I have no idea. Also with the newer machines, the battery will
    last longer because the newer motherboards place less demand on them.
    Another plus of modern electronics that still has not extended to other
    devices in the PC.

    > Well, if a tech has to solder the batteries off and on, or you have to buy

    a
    > $25 aux battery rather than the user to be able to replace a $3 3 volt

    disk
    > battery--maybe thats the wisdom from Compaqs part. Maybe a soldered on is
    > cheaper than a battery in a holder?
    >
    > Dale
     
    Kevin Childers, Oct 29, 2003
    #15
  16. Paul

    HH Guest

    Many Compaq systemboards had a 3-pin connector close to the preinstalled
    battery. You could attach a 4.5 volt alkaline battery to take the place of
    the dead systemboard battery. Compaq sold these batteries, which included
    the battery, a 3-wire connector and velcro strip to attach the battery to
    the systemboard.
    HH

    "Kevin Childers" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Batteries were once soldered on boards because at the time the only
    > batteries that could do the job were of a type that required it and

    computer
    > designers were not concerned with this issue much. With the boom in
    > personal computers and improvements in battery technology created the

    simple
    > to install ones we use today. That is why they came up with the auxiliary
    > batteries to allow you to supplement a computer with a dead soldered on
    > battery. Computer techs used to have to unsolder the old batteries and

    then
    > solder on a new one. Not to hard on a single layer board of that era, the
    > devil to do on the new boards of today.
    >
    > Now you, God, Compaq (and all of the other mother board manufacturers

    of
    > that era), and all the readers of this forum know why.
    >
    > KC
    >
    > "DEJ57" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > >

    > >
    > > >
    > > >Regarding the CMOS reset: My understanding is that I have to remove
    > > >the battery from the motherboard in order to reset the CMOS. The
    > > >battery seems to be fixed quite securely to the motherboard and
    > > >certainly not removable by hand. I have not tried using a screwdriver,
    > > >but I will certainly try it sometime if the boot floppy will not work.

    > >
    > > Some CMOS batteries are soldered onto the systemboard (only God and

    Compaq
    > know
    > > why). Should be jumper pins somewhere on the board, with a jumper in

    > place,
    > > that controls the flow of current to the CMOS from the battery, and is

    > also the
    > > connection point for an aux battery to attach to and power the CMOS when

    > the
    > > onboard battery goes dead.
    > >
    > > Dale

    >
    >
     
    HH, Oct 29, 2003
    #16
  17. Paul

    DEJ57 Guest

    >You could attach a 4.5 volt alkaline battery to take the place of
    >the dead systemboard battery. Compaq sold these batteries, which included
    >the battery, a 3-wire connector and velcro strip to attach the battery to
    >the systemboard.
    >HH


    I purchased a few of these over the years and they ran me $25 total each....

    Dale
     
    DEJ57, Oct 29, 2003
    #17
  18. Paul

    DEJ57 Guest

    > The wired on batteries were an alternetive not seen much outside of
    >Compaqs that I know of. I should have mentioned that the majority of my
    >experience has been with non-Compaq machines. The lates and greatest
    >battery solution is the socketed NiCAD or lithium battery. Actually when
    >the change came to the socket, you could occasionally find a board that had
    >the socket, but all documentation would still show the old soldered battery.
    >Cost wise I have no idea. Also with the newer machines, the battery will
    >last longer because the newer motherboards place less demand on them.


    What you have described may in fact explain battery history in many clones,
    but, unless I missed it, you haven't explained why Compaq did what they did
    over the past. It still remains a mystery that only God and Compaq understand.

    Dale
     
    DEJ57, Oct 29, 2003
    #18
  19. Paul

    Mike Calkins Guest

    "DEJ57" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >You could attach a 4.5 volt alkaline battery to take the place of
    > >the dead systemboard battery. Compaq sold these batteries, which included
    > >the battery, a 3-wire connector and velcro strip to attach the battery to
    > >the systemboard.
    > >HH

    >
    > I purchased a few of these over the years and they ran me $25 total

    each....
    >
    > Dale


    There was also a 4 AA battery pack (with the 3-wire connector), available in
    most electronics stores, for $3.95 (less AA cells). Then when the batteries
    died, you just replaced the AA cells.
     
    Mike Calkins, Oct 30, 2003
    #19
  20. Paul

    Wipout4ski Guest

    the old deskpros are cable select meaning you can leave the drives jumpered as
    masters instead of specifying a slave drive,

    to be honest you should be able to throw on win98 and all the drivers except
    possibly the video driver will be there
     
    Wipout4ski, Oct 31, 2003
    #20
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