Getting Rid Of Permissions?

Discussion in 'Apple' started by aryder, Aug 8, 2007.

  1. aryder

    aryder Guest

    Only one person uses my computer--me! I'm tired of it asking me for
    passwords to change anything all the time. Anyway to stop it from
    doing this? I'm using 10.3 on a MAC G5. Thanks!
    aryder, Aug 8, 2007
    #1
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  2. aryder

    Adam Guest

    On Aug 8, 12:20 pm, aryder <> wrote:
    > Only one person uses my computer--me!


    Do you like that feature? Passwords help keep it that way.
    Adam, Aug 8, 2007
    #2
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  3. aryder wrote:
    > Only one person uses my computer--me! I'm tired of it asking me for
    > passwords to change anything all the time. Anyway to stop it from
    > doing this? I'm using 10.3 on a MAC G5. Thanks!
    >

    you can't eliminate it, but you can set a null password.
    The Natural Philosopher, Aug 9, 2007
    #3
  4. aryder

    aryder Guest

    What is a null password, and how do you do that? Thanks!

    > you can't eliminate it, but you can set a null password.
    aryder, Aug 9, 2007
    #4
  5. aryder

    Adam Guest

    On Aug 8, 4:41 pm, aryder <> wrote:
    > What is a null password, and how do you do that? Thanks!
    >
    > > you can't eliminate it, but you can set a null password.


    You could set the password to be blank. Then when the dialogs come
    up, all you would have to do is hit return.

    But - unless you never connect to the internet - that's a bad idea.
    Even if your computer is a desktop at your house. Is it possible
    there is a configuration problem at your end? I don't get asked for
    my password enough to really bother me that much - only when I am
    installing global control panels or updating software via the software
    updater.
    Adam, Aug 9, 2007
    #5
  6. Jolly Roger wrote:
    > On 2007-08-08 18:11:34 -0500, The Natural Philosopher <> said:
    >
    >> aryder wrote:
    >>> Only one person uses my computer--me! I'm tired of it asking me for
    >>> passwords to change anything all the time. Anyway to stop it from
    >>> doing this? I'm using 10.3 on a MAC G5. Thanks!
    >>>

    >> you can't eliminate it, but you can set a null password.

    >
    > Yeah, great advice there...
    >

    Why thank you. I think it is really.

    Its as near to the OP's requirements as its possible to get, and unlike
    your post, addresses the issue without patronising the crap out of him
    on specious grounds.

    I've already told you that there are two Macs here both set up that way.
    I challenged you to hack them, and you simply didn't answer.
    The Natural Philosopher, Aug 9, 2007
    #6
  7. aryder wrote:
    > Only one person uses my computer--me! I'm tired of it asking me for
    > passwords to change anything all the time. Anyway to stop it from
    > doing this? I'm using 10.3 on a MAC G5. Thanks!
    >

    Apple Support has an article on opening your computer wide open to
    everyone. Knock yourself out.

    Real computers ask for credentials to do certain tasks. You can control
    what those certain tasks are to some degree.
    --
    clvrmnky <mailto:>

    Direct replies will be blacklisted. Replace "spamtrap" with my name to
    contact me directly.
    Clever Monkey, Aug 9, 2007
    #7
  8. aryder

    The New Guy Guest

    > Only one person uses my computer--me! I'm tired of it asking me for
    > passwords to change anything all the time. Anyway to stop it from
    > doing this? I'm using 10.3 on a MAC G5. Thanks!


    Apple has this in place (and has used it for many years) because it
    works.

    The way of making it less inconvenient is to use a password that is
    very, very easy to type with your non-mouse hand.
    The New Guy, Aug 10, 2007
    #8
  9. The New Guy wrote:
    >> Only one person uses my computer--me! I'm tired of it asking me for
    >> passwords to change anything all the time. Anyway to stop it from
    >> doing this? I'm using 10.3 on a MAC G5. Thanks!

    >
    > Apple has this in place (and has used it for many years) because it
    > works.
    >
    > The way of making it less inconvenient is to use a password that is
    > very, very easy to type with your non-mouse hand.


    A null works very well.
    The Natural Philosopher, Aug 10, 2007
    #9
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