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GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked In Liquids)

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by Guy Macon, Jun 22, 2007.

  1. Guy Macon

    Guy Macon Guest

    Gabor wrote:
    >
    >On Jun 22, 9:15 am, wrote:
    >> Me and my buddy made a website called [deleted].com, its
    >> basically a free forum and free blog driven web site dedicated as a
    >> source people can goto to find out how to clean and remove stains from
    >> pretty much anything. Problem is, as of yet, you couldn't find out how
    >> to clean anything right now cause the site is new and no one has found
    >> it yet.
    >>
    >> We don't know enough about cleaning and tips and tricks to really fill
    >> the site. Were looking to get more useful content so that the website
    >> eventually shows up in search results.
    >>
    >> If anyone here is interested, visitwww.CleaningTips.com/forum.html,
    >> and if there is anything you could add to the site please feel free to
    >> do so. Email me at [deleted]@gmail.com if you find anything that
    >> could improve the site or if something doesn't seem to be working
    >> properly.

    >
    >How about...
    >How to clean your keyboard
    >
    >http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=11029793


    ----------------------------------------------------------------

    GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked In Liquids)


    (Feel free to repost, but please include this reference
    to my webpage at [ http://www.guymacon.com/ ].)


    [1] Remove all power sources. Unplug the device and
    remove all batteries, including soldered in batteries
    if you can.


    [2] Disassemble the device as well as your skills allow.
    If there is a paper cone speaker or other part that
    looks like it might be damaged by water, set it aside.


    [3] Go outside with a garden hose or put it in the sink
    and flush it with clean water to try to remove any
    soap, coffee, urine, or whatever else you managed to
    get in there.


    [4] Use a 1/2 gallon jug of distilled water (make sure it's
    the distilled kind) and flush out the normal water.


    [5] Use a bottle or two of isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to
    flush the distilled water out. For antique devices
    that may have natural rubber in them, use pure drinking
    alcohol. In either case, the higher the proof/percentage
    the better.


    [6] Put it in a warm, dry place until you can't smell any
    alcohol. Then leave it for at least another day before
    reassembling and testing.


    [7] If you are in a hurry, you can try to accelerate step
    six with a fan, blow drier, etc. It's up to you to
    insure that you don't start an alcohol fire.


    Guy Macon
    http://www.guymacon.com/


    -------------------------------------------------------------
    Guy Macon, Jun 22, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Guy Macon

    Don Leverton Guest

    Hi Guy,

    IMHO,
    Step #1 should be: "DO NOT attempt (FIGHT THE TEMPTATION) to power it up it
    see if it still works!"


    We used to sell cellular phones, and we'd get a "liquid damage customer"at
    least once per month.

    First question: "Have you tried powering it on?"
    If the answer was "Yes", our responce was "Well, it's probably TOAST, then!"
    The look on their face when the realization hit them was a little sad, but a
    little bit funny, too.




    "Guy Macon" <"http://www.guymacon.com/"@example.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > Gabor wrote:
    >>
    >>On Jun 22, 9:15 am, wrote:
    >>> Me and my buddy made a website called [deleted].com, its
    >>> basically a free forum and free blog driven web site dedicated as a
    >>> source people can goto to find out how to clean and remove stains from
    >>> pretty much anything. Problem is, as of yet, you couldn't find out how
    >>> to clean anything right now cause the site is new and no one has found
    >>> it yet.
    >>>
    >>> We don't know enough about cleaning and tips and tricks to really fill
    >>> the site. Were looking to get more useful content so that the website
    >>> eventually shows up in search results.
    >>>
    >>> If anyone here is interested, visitwww.CleaningTips.com/forum.html,
    >>> and if there is anything you could add to the site please feel free to
    >>> do so. Email me at [deleted]@gmail.com if you find anything that
    >>> could improve the site or if something doesn't seem to be working
    >>> properly.

    >>
    >>How about...
    >>How to clean your keyboard
    >>
    >>http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=11029793

    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked In Liquids)
    >
    >
    > (Feel free to repost, but please include this reference
    > to my webpage at [ http://www.guymacon.com/ ].)
    >
    >
    > [1] Remove all power sources. Unplug the device and
    > remove all batteries, including soldered in batteries
    > if you can.
    >
    >
    > [2] Disassemble the device as well as your skills allow.
    > If there is a paper cone speaker or other part that
    > looks like it might be damaged by water, set it aside.
    >
    >
    > [3] Go outside with a garden hose or put it in the sink
    > and flush it with clean water to try to remove any
    > soap, coffee, urine, or whatever else you managed to
    > get in there.
    >
    >
    > [4] Use a 1/2 gallon jug of distilled water (make sure it's
    > the distilled kind) and flush out the normal water.
    >
    >
    > [5] Use a bottle or two of isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to
    > flush the distilled water out. For antique devices
    > that may have natural rubber in them, use pure drinking
    > alcohol. In either case, the higher the proof/percentage
    > the better.
    >
    >
    > [6] Put it in a warm, dry place until you can't smell any
    > alcohol. Then leave it for at least another day before
    > reassembling and testing.
    >
    >
    > [7] If you are in a hurry, you can try to accelerate step
    > six with a fan, blow drier, etc. It's up to you to
    > insure that you don't start an alcohol fire.
    >
    >
    > Guy Macon
    > http://www.guymacon.com/
    >
    >
    > -------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    Don Leverton, Jun 22, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Guy Macon

    Guy Macon Guest

    Don Leverton wrote:
    >
    >Hi Guy,
    >
    >IMHO,
    >Step #1 should be: "DO NOT attempt (FIGHT THE TEMPTATION) to power it up it
    >see if it still works!"
    >
    >We used to sell cellular phones, and we'd get a "liquid damage customer"at
    >least once per month.
    >
    >First question: "Have you tried powering it on?"
    >If the answer was "Yes", our responce was "Well, it's probably TOAST, then!"
    >The look on their face when the realization hit them was a little sad, but a
    >little bit funny, too.


    Excellent suggestion. Here is the new version:

    -------------------------------------------------------------

    GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked In Liquids)

    (Feel free to repost, but please include this reference
    to my webpage at [ http://www.guymacon.com/ ].)

    [1] Do not attempt to power the device up to see if it
    still works. Doing so is likely to damage the
    electronics.

    [2] Remove all power sources. Unplug the device and
    remove all batteries, including soldered in batteries
    if you can.

    [3] Disassemble the device as well as your skills allow.
    If there is a paper cone speaker or other part that
    looks like it might be damaged by water, set it aside.

    [4] Go outside with a garden hose or put it in the sink
    and flush it with clean water to try to remove any
    soap, coffee, urine, or whatever else you managed to
    get in there.

    [5] Use a 1/2 gallon jug of distilled water (make sure it's
    the distilled kind) and flush out the normal water.

    [6] Use a bottle or two of isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to
    flush the distilled water out. For antique devices
    that may have natural rubber in them, use pure drinking
    alcohol. In either case, the higher the proof/percentage
    the better.

    [7] Put it in a warm, dry place until you can't smell any
    alcohol. Then leave it for at least another day before
    reassembling and testing.

    [8] If you are in a hurry, you can try to accelerate step
    six with a fan, blow drier, etc. It's up to you to
    insure that you don't start an alcohol fire.

    Guy Macon
    http://www.guymacon.com/

    -------------------------------------------------------------

    Thanks!
    Guy Macon, Jun 23, 2007
    #3
  4. Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com/> writes:
    [snip]
    > [8] If you are in a hurry, you can try to accelerate step
    > six with a fan, blow drier, etc. It's up to you to
    > insure that you don't start an alcohol fire.


    Won't the fire dry things faster?
    Everett M. Greene, Jun 25, 2007
    #4
  5. Guy Macon

    Mike H Guest

    Guy Macon wrote:
    >
    > [6] Use a bottle or two of isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to
    > flush the distilled water out. For antique devices
    > that may have natural rubber in them, use pure drinking
    > alcohol. In either case, the higher the proof/percentage
    > the better.



    [6a] If you use pure drinking alcohol, fight the urge to let it
    drain into you mouth.
    Mike H, Jun 25, 2007
    #5
  6. Guy Macon

    Guy Macon Guest

    Everett M. Greene wrote:
    >
    >Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com/> writes:
    >[snip]
    >> [8] If you are in a hurry, you can try to accelerate step
    >> six with a fan, blow drier, etc. It's up to you to
    >> insure that you don't start an alcohol fire.

    >
    >Won't the fire dry things faster?


    Good point! (grin)
    Guy Macon, Jun 25, 2007
    #6
  7. Guy Macon

    Hershel Guest

    On 25-Jun-2007, Mike H <> wrote:

    > > [6] Use a bottle or two of isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to
    > > flush the distilled water out. For antique devices
    > > that may have natural rubber in them, use pure drinking
    > > alcohol. In either case, the higher the proof/percentage
    > > the better.

    >
    >
    > [6a] If you use pure drinking alcohol, fight the urge to let it
    > drain into you mouth.


    (6b) Reduce drying time by licking off any excess alcohol.
    Hershel, Jun 25, 2007
    #7
  8. Guy Macon

    Alex Gibson Guest

    "Guy Macon" <"http://www.guymacon.com/"@example.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked In Liquids)
    >
    >
    > (Feel free to repost, but please include this reference
    > to my webpage at [ http://www.guymacon.com/ ].)
    >


    What about for electronics that are still working but are full of water
    especially things like static inverters , fluro light balasts , transmitters
    , industrial pcs etc ?



    Alex
    Alex Gibson, Jun 26, 2007
    #8
  9. Guy Macon

    Guy Macon Guest

    Alex Gibson wrote:

    >What about for electronics that are still working but are full
    >of water especially things like static inverters , fluro light
    >balasts , transmitters, industrial pcs etc ?


    The water will cause ionic corrosion, thus converting the working
    unit into a nonworking unit. This can happen in a week if you
    spilled, say, salt water in it, or it could take months if the
    liquid was tap water. If you are lucky the failure will be an
    open circuit and the unit will go dead. If you are unlucky it
    will be a short circuit and the unit will catch on fire.

    Simply letting it dry does not remove the deposits that promote
    corrosion. GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked
    In Liquids) does. Once dry, the damage comes from humidity and
    the minerals/salts deposited on the circuitry, which means that
    the unit may survive for years in a dry desert environment, but
    go bad in a few weeks in a humid environment.

    If the liquid has an organic component (coffee with cream, soda,
    blood, urine, etc.) it can promote insect infestations, bacterial
    growth, or mold.

    (Feel free to insert humorous comment of your choice here
    concerning how one manages to soak a PC in blood or urine.
    extra points if you mention Bill Gates.) :)


    -------------------------------------------------------------

    GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked In Liquids)

    (Feel free to repost, but please include this reference
    to my webpage at [ http://www.guymacon.com/ ].)

    [1] Do not attempt to power the device up to see if it
    still works. Doing so is likely to damage the
    electronics.

    [2] Remove all power sources. Unplug the device and
    remove all batteries, including soldered in batteries
    if you can.

    [3] Disassemble the device as well as your skills allow.
    If there is a paper cone speaker or other part that
    looks like it might be damaged by water, set it aside.

    [4] Go outside with a garden hose or put it in the sink
    and flush it with clean water to try to remove any
    soap, coffee, urine, or whatever else you managed to
    get in there.

    [5] Use a 1/2 gallon jug of distilled water (make sure it's
    the distilled kind) and flush out the normal water.

    [6] Use a bottle or two of isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to
    flush the distilled water out. For antique devices
    that may have natural rubber in them, use pure drinking
    alcohol. In either case, the higher the proof/percentage
    the better.

    [7] Put it in a warm, dry place until you can't smell any
    alcohol. Then leave it for at least another day before
    reassembling and testing.

    [8] If you are in a hurry, you can try to accelerate step
    six with a fan, blow drier, etc. It's up to you to
    insure that you don't start an alcohol fire.

    Guy Macon
    http://www.guymacon.com/

    -------------------------------------------------------------
    Guy Macon, Jun 28, 2007
    #9
  10. Someone misunderstood the concept of "p-code"?

    "Guy Macon" <http://www.guymacon.com/> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > Alex Gibson wrote:
    >
    >>What about for electronics that are still working but are full
    >>of water especially things like static inverters , fluro light
    >>balasts , transmitters, industrial pcs etc ?

    >
    > The water will cause ionic corrosion, thus converting the working
    > unit into a nonworking unit. This can happen in a week if you
    > spilled, say, salt water in it, or it could take months if the
    > liquid was tap water. If you are lucky the failure will be an
    > open circuit and the unit will go dead. If you are unlucky it
    > will be a short circuit and the unit will catch on fire.
    >
    > Simply letting it dry does not remove the deposits that promote
    > corrosion. GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked
    > In Liquids) does. Once dry, the damage comes from humidity and
    > the minerals/salts deposited on the circuitry, which means that
    > the unit may survive for years in a dry desert environment, but
    > go bad in a few weeks in a humid environment.
    >
    > If the liquid has an organic component (coffee with cream, soda,
    > blood, urine, etc.) it can promote insect infestations, bacterial
    > growth, or mold.
    >
    > (Feel free to insert humorous comment of your choice here
    > concerning how one manages to soak a PC in blood or urine.
    > extra points if you mention Bill Gates.) :)
    >
    >
    > -------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked In Liquids)
    >
    > (Feel free to repost, but please include this reference
    > to my webpage at [ http://www.guymacon.com/ ].)
    >
    > [1] Do not attempt to power the device up to see if it
    > still works. Doing so is likely to damage the
    > electronics.
    >
    > [2] Remove all power sources. Unplug the device and
    > remove all batteries, including soldered in batteries
    > if you can.
    >
    > [3] Disassemble the device as well as your skills allow.
    > If there is a paper cone speaker or other part that
    > looks like it might be damaged by water, set it aside.
    >
    > [4] Go outside with a garden hose or put it in the sink
    > and flush it with clean water to try to remove any
    > soap, coffee, urine, or whatever else you managed to
    > get in there.
    >
    > [5] Use a 1/2 gallon jug of distilled water (make sure it's
    > the distilled kind) and flush out the normal water.
    >
    > [6] Use a bottle or two of isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to
    > flush the distilled water out. For antique devices
    > that may have natural rubber in them, use pure drinking
    > alcohol. In either case, the higher the proof/percentage
    > the better.
    >
    > [7] Put it in a warm, dry place until you can't smell any
    > alcohol. Then leave it for at least another day before
    > reassembling and testing.
    >
    > [8] If you are in a hurry, you can try to accelerate step
    > six with a fan, blow drier, etc. It's up to you to
    > insure that you don't start an alcohol fire.
    >
    > Guy Macon
    > http://www.guymacon.com/
    >
    > -------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    >
    Rufus V. Smith, Jul 18, 2007
    #10
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