Heat-tolerent computers.

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Skybuck Flying, Aug 15, 2011.

  1. Here is an idea for the future which could buy some time with increasing
    computer performance:

    Start designing entire computers which are very heat tolerent.

    So illiminate all components which are low heat tolerent like plastics/pcb's
    and such.

    Replace everything with maybe metals or so which could be high heat
    tolerent.

    Then these systems could run up to maybe 100 degrees of heat maybe even
    more.

    These systems would then have to throttle down in the summer when it's hot.

    But they could also throttle up in the winter when it's freezing cold.

    And then these computers could function as a replacement for "home heating"
    and at the same time give nice processing performance ! ;) =D

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    Skybuck Flying, Aug 15, 2011
    #1
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  2. Skybuck Flying

    Dave Platt Guest

    In article <632c3$4e4886f9$5419acc3$1.nb.home.nl>,
    Skybuck Flying <> wrote:

    >Here is an idea for the future which could buy some time with increasing
    >computer performance:
    >
    >Start designing entire computers which are very heat tolerent.


    Start? It's been done for years. Ruggedized computers designed to
    operate in the "industrial" and "military" temperature ranges are
    available off-the-shelf.

    You won't like the cost. Using heat-resistant, long-life parts comes
    at a significant price.

    --
    Dave Platt <> AE6EO
    Friends of Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
    I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
    boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!
    Dave Platt, Aug 15, 2011
    #2
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  3. Skybuck Flying

    Tim Guest

    On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 20:24:51 -0700, Dave Platt wrote:

    > In article <632c3$4e4886f9$5419acc3$1.nb.home.nl>,
    > Skybuck Flying <> wrote:
    >
    >>Here is an idea for the future which could buy some time with increasing
    >>computer performance:
    >>
    >>Start designing entire computers which are very heat tolerent.

    >
    > Start? It's been done for years. Ruggedized computers designed to
    > operate in the "industrial" and "military" temperature ranges are
    > available off-the-shelf.
    >
    > You won't like the cost. Using heat-resistant, long-life parts comes at
    > a significant price.


    And computers that operate over 100C are available, but even more spendy.

    --
    Tim Wescott
    Control system and signal processing consulting
    www.wescottdesign.com
    Tim, Aug 15, 2011
    #3
  4. "Tim" wrote in message
    news:...

    On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 20:24:51 -0700, Dave Platt wrote:

    > In article <632c3$4e4886f9$5419acc3$1.nb.home.nl>,
    > Skybuck Flying <> wrote:
    >
    >>Here is an idea for the future which could buy some time with increasing
    >>computer performance:
    >>
    >>Start designing entire computers which are very heat tolerent.

    >
    > Start? It's been done for years. Ruggedized computers designed to
    > operate in the "industrial" and "military" temperature ranges are
    > available off-the-shelf.
    >
    > You won't like the cost. Using heat-resistant, long-life parts comes at
    > a significant price.


    "
    And computers that operate over 100C are available, but even more spendy.
    "

    Lol, ok, I am going to give you a really cheap reply:

    "Start designing heat-tolerent computers for consumers" ! ;) =D

    So start designing "heat-tolerent-consumer-grade-computers" which john doe
    can afford as well ! ;) =D

    Bye,
    Skybuck =D
    Skybuck Flying, Aug 15, 2011
    #4
  5. Skybuck Flying

    Paul Guest

    Paul, Aug 15, 2011
    #5
  6. On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 04:40:18 +0200, "Skybuck Flying" <>
    wrote:

    > Here is an idea for the future which could buy some time with increasing
    > computer performance:
    >
    > Start designing entire computers which are very heat tolerent.
    >
    > So illiminate all components which are low heat tolerent like plastics/pcb's
    > and such.
    >
    > Replace everything with maybe metals or so which could be high heat
    > tolerent.
    >
    > Then these systems could run up to maybe 100 degrees of heat maybe even
    > more.
    >
    > These systems would then have to throttle down in the summer when it's hot.
    >
    > But they could also throttle up in the winter when it's freezing cold.
    >
    > And then these computers could function as a replacement for "home heating"
    > and at the same time give nice processing performance ! ;) =D
    >

    My computers are quite happy to run at 300 degrees above absolute zero.
    Gettamulla Tupya, Aug 15, 2011
    #6
  7. Skybuck Flying

    Tim Wescott Guest

    On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 08:43:51 +0200, Skybuck Flying wrote:

    > "Tim" wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    > On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 20:24:51 -0700, Dave Platt wrote:
    >
    >> In article <632c3$4e4886f9$5419acc3$1.nb.home.nl>,
    >> Skybuck Flying <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Here is an idea for the future which could buy some time with
    >>>increasing computer performance:
    >>>
    >>>Start designing entire computers which are very heat tolerent.

    >>
    >> Start? It's been done for years. Ruggedized computers designed to
    >> operate in the "industrial" and "military" temperature ranges are
    >> available off-the-shelf.
    >>
    >> You won't like the cost. Using heat-resistant, long-life parts comes
    >> at a significant price.

    >
    > "
    > And computers that operate over 100C are available, but even more
    > spendy. "
    >
    > Lol, ok, I am going to give you a really cheap reply:
    >
    > "Start designing heat-tolerent computers for consumers" ! ;) =D
    >
    > So start designing "heat-tolerent-consumer-grade-computers" which john
    > doe can afford as well ! ;) =D
    >
    > Bye,
    > Skybuck =D


    LOL. I have a suggestion for you:

    Cash out your entire net worth, savings, cars, cloths, furniture,
    bedding, etc., and throw it in a river. The end effect is the same, but
    it's quicker, less effort, and you can start over again sooner.

    --
    www.wescottdesign.com
    Tim Wescott, Aug 15, 2011
    #7
  8. So, Yet Another Skyfuck Careening computer build bit the dust, eh?

    Jeeze, dude. Just buy a freakin' Dell and give up trying to build
    anything...and I mean ANYTHING...
    personaobscura, Aug 18, 2011
    #8
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