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Help overclocking AMD 64 (Hammer) 3500+

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by munmoe@gmail.com, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Asus A7N8X MoBo with 200MHz clock,
    Athlon 64 3500+ Hammer, CPU (939) chip-set 1800MHz 64K L1, 512k L2
    (2) Gig of crucial PC3500 DDR SDRAM
    3500 MB swap, 5500 MB virtual memory
    Phoenix Award Bios v 6.0
    Windows XP Pro SP3 (Updated)
    Nivida Geforce 8600 GT (256MB) (PCIE)
    on-board sound card
    5 cooling fans via Enermax digital fan controller and temperature
    monitor.

    My benchmarks are not very impressive. I play Overlord, Sim City 4
    Deluxe, Stronghold 3, The Settlers - Rise of empires, And the sims 2
    with all the expansion packs installed.

    I want to Overclock this baby!
    If anyone has particular experience with my hardware and could lend a
    hand, it would be very appreciative....
     
    , Aug 9, 2008
    #1
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  2. Ed Light Guest

    I have a Gigabyte nforce 3.

    I overclocked my 3200+ Winchester (2.0 gig, 10x multiplier) 20% by
    setting the clock to 240 (which raises the memory and hypertransport),
    hypertransport down to 4x (4 x 240 = 960), memory down to 166 (= 196.4),
    and had to raise the cpu voltage .05v for it to run constantly in
    prime95 without an error.

    Overclocking throws cool'n'quiet off so I had uninstalled that amd driver.

    I could go a little higher but it gets hot then.
    --
    Ed Light

    Better World News TV Channel:
    http://realnews.com

    Bring the Troops Home:
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    http://antiwar.com

    Iraq Veterans Against the War:
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    Send spam to the FTC at

    Thanks, robots.
     
    Ed Light, Aug 9, 2008
    #2
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  3. Moe Guest

    Ed, My bios is locked. I cant change my clock speed or multipliers. Is
    there any software or tweaks i can use to do this?
     
    Moe, Aug 10, 2008
    #3
  4. Paul Guest

    Moe wrote:
    > Ed, My bios is locked. I cant change my clock speed or multipliers. Is
    > there any software or tweaks i can use to do this?


    Check the make and model of the motherboard again. And
    post the details. If it is an Asus motherboard,
    and not a microATX form factor, there is a good chance
    the clock can be changed. With Asus, it helps to take
    certain settings off "Auto" and change them to "Manual".
    Then things like clocks become adjustable.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Aug 10, 2008
    #4
  5. ShadowTek Guest

    Moe <> wrote in news:5f9ac14e-d3c6-4589-a1f5-7fc6e00948f4
    @k7g2000hsd.googlegroups.com:

    > Ed, My bios is locked. I cant change my clock speed or multipliers. Is
    > there any software or tweaks i can use to do this?


    Did you build this yourself, or did you buy it prebuilt from a PC
    manufacturer?
     
    ShadowTek, Aug 10, 2008
    #5
  6. Ed Light Guest

    wrote:
    > Asus A7N8X MoBo with 200MHz clock,
    > Athlon 64 3500+ Hammer, CPU (939) chip-set 1800MHz 64K L1, 512k L2


    Slight problem. I looked up your manual at Asus and your board is socket
    A, so it couldn't have a K8 (Athlon 64) cpu, or the Asus model # is wrong.

    http://support.asus.com/download/download_item.aspx?model=A7N8X&product=1&type=Map&SLanguage=en-us

    --
    Ed Light

    Better World News TV Channel:
    http://realnews.com

    Bring the Troops Home:
    http://bringthemhomenow.org
    http://antiwar.com

    Iraq Veterans Against the War:
    http://ivaw.org
    http://couragetoresist.org

    Send spam to the FTC at

    Thanks, robots.
     
    Ed Light, Aug 10, 2008
    #6
  7. Moe Guest

    Please forgive, I made a mistake on mobo model. Its an Asus A8AE-LE
    (SR1750NX). Darn windows ID showed wrong mobo. CPUZ straightened me
    out.
     
    Moe, Aug 10, 2008
    #7
  8. Moe Guest


    > Did you build this yourself, or did you buy it prebuilt from a PC
    > manufacturer?


    Bought mobo from garage sale, bought CPU and RAM from new egg, Optical
    drive, cooling system, Video card, 22" wide screen monitor from tiger
    direct. And everything else was resurrected from dead machines.
     
    Moe, Aug 10, 2008
    #8
  9. Moe Guest


    > Did you build this yourself, or did you buy it prebuilt from a PC
    > manufacturer?


    Got mobo from garage sale. CPU and RAM from new egg. Optical,cooling,
    Video from tiger direct. Rest from old rigs in closet.
     
    Moe, Aug 10, 2008
    #9
  10. Paul Guest

    Moe wrote:
    > Please forgive, I made a mistake on mobo model. Its an Asus A8AE-LE
    > (SR1750NX). Darn windows ID showed wrong mobo. CPUZ straightened me
    > out.


    So that is not just any old retail Asus board. It is an OEM
    board. Such boards have restrictive BIOS sent with them (very
    few features - most parameter are set automatically). The board
    was part of an HP computer, and the motherboard was custom
    manufactured for HP by Asus.

    Amberine-M with an ATI chipsets ( RS482 / SB400 ).

    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/...c00496280&dlc=en&lc=en&jumpid=reg_R1002_USEN#

    I do not see an easy way to fix this. The key to
    changing the clock now, would be the clock generator
    chip to the left of the Northbridge heatsink. Some have
    multiple bit inputs, and that is one way to select
    canonical frequencies (download a datasheet, unsolder
    and bend up certain pins, and program your own frequency).
    You might get frequencies like 133,166,200,266 MHz and so on.
    That is a bit coarse for overclocking purposes. Only
    processors with large, known headroom, would be candidates
    for a hack like that.

    The clock generator chip also has a serial bus connection.
    An example of a program that can access a clock generator
    chip is Clockgen from cpuid.com. But Clockgen has a very
    limited set of supported clock generator chips, and so even
    if the program was still available, it most likely would not
    help you. (Perhaps someone else can suggest a program like
    Clockgen for you.)

    I cannot even see a retail Asus motherboard, that matches the
    design of your OEM board. So swapping the BIOS is also not
    an option. There are very few Asus designs, that were alike
    for both OEM and retail applications. When a board goes into
    an HP computer, usually things like the SuperI/O get changed,
    at the very least.

    Since you say this is not a genuine HP computer, the solution
    is simple. Find a motherboard that has better overclocking
    options. A retail motherboard (one listed on one of the major
    motherboard makers), is likely to be overclockable. But to be
    sure, download the manual for the motherboard from the
    manufacturer site. Virtually all retail motherboards, have
    downloadable manuals, so you can study the feature set, before
    committing dollars to them.

    Sorry,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Aug 10, 2008
    #10
  11. Moe Guest

    Thanks Paul,

    Your information was very helpful. Maybe I can find an ATX or
    comparable in the bargain bin at new egg. Layed off right now, and
    don't have the cash.
     
    Moe, Aug 10, 2008
    #11
  12. Ed Light Guest

    Ed Light, Aug 10, 2008
    #12
  13. Ed Light Guest

    Moe wrote:

    > Thanks Paul


    His answer was spectacular!

    > Maybe I can find an ATX or
    > comparable in the bargain bin at new egg.


    Newegg presently doesn't have any 939's. Pricewatch shows some for
    around $50. It would take some manual reading to see what they could do.

    http://www.pricewatch.com/motherboards/socket_939.htm

    If you can manage it, you could always get an am2 board, cpu with
    cooler, and 2 gigs of memory for a little over $100. Throw in $30 more
    for dual-core.

    --
    Ed Light

    Better World News TV Channel:
    http://realnews.com

    Bring the Troops Home:
    http://bringthemhomenow.org
    http://antiwar.com

    Iraq Veterans Against the War:
    http://ivaw.org
    http://couragetoresist.org

    Send spam to the FTC at

    Thanks, robots.
     
    Ed Light, Aug 10, 2008
    #13
  14. Paul Guest

    Moe wrote:
    > Thanks Paul,
    >
    > Your information was very helpful. Maybe I can find an ATX or
    > comparable in the bargain bin at new egg. Layed off right now, and
    > don't have the cash.


    You can try researching this one. S939 board with PCI Express graphics
    slot, found via Pricewatch.com . $40. (S939 has been out of production
    for a while, so you would not expect the "pick of the litter" in terms
    of motherboards at retail.)

    http://3btech.net/asa8so939maw.html

    When it comes to stores on Pricewatch, it pays to check BBB or resellerratings.com .
    You can see their reputation here, and read comments posted by people. I
    guess my main concern, would be whether these people could be trusted to
    handle an RMA, if the board is bad. (One danger with a $40 board, is a
    lot of returns "orbiting" through the retailer, such that all they carry
    are leftover bad boards.)

    http://www.resellerratings.com/store/3B_Tech

    This thread on the Asus forums, mentions the A8S-X is overclockable. At $40,
    don't expect miracles. You may also want to read other reviews if you can find
    them, to check to see whether the other clocks, like the PCI Express or
    the SATA clock are "locked", while you're overclocking the processor.

    http://vip.asus.com/forum/view.aspx...board_id=1&model=A8S-X&page=1&SLanguage=en-us

    You can pick up a manual here.

    http://support.asus.com/download/download.aspx?SLanguage=en-us&model=a8s-x

    More comments here.

    http://www.newegg.com/product/ProductReview.aspx?item=N82E16813131525

    Maybe you'll find something more worthy on Ebay.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Aug 10, 2008
    #14
  15. Moe Guest

    Paul wrote:

    > The clock generator chip also has a serial bus connection.
    > An example of a program that can access a clock generator
    > chip is Clockgen from cpuid.com. But Clockgen has a very
    > limited set of supported clock generator chips, and so even
    > if the program was still available, it most likely would not
    > help you. (Perhaps someone else can suggest a program like
    > Clockgen for you.)


    Awesome tip! I found Clockgen 1.0.5.3, then found the PLL for the Asus
    A8AE-LE (ICS 951412)

    I was able to raise the bus speed to 230MHZ. (Max it would let me).

    Results:

    Bus 200 MHz to 229.4 MHz
    CPU from 2200 MHz to 2523.4 MHz at 11x Multiplier
    PCI-E from 100 MHz to 115 MHz

    Not a great jump, but a good start. Im gonna keep looking to see if I
    can find anything to raise it up higher.

    Temp after boost = 40 C

    Thanks again.
     
    Moe, Aug 10, 2008
    #15
  16. Paul Guest

    Moe wrote:
    > Paul wrote:
    >
    >> The clock generator chip also has a serial bus connection.
    >> An example of a program that can access a clock generator
    >> chip is Clockgen from cpuid.com. But Clockgen has a very
    >> limited set of supported clock generator chips, and so even
    >> if the program was still available, it most likely would not
    >> help you. (Perhaps someone else can suggest a program like
    >> Clockgen for you.)

    >
    > Awesome tip! I found Clockgen 1.0.5.3, then found the PLL for the Asus
    > A8AE-LE (ICS 951412)
    >
    > I was able to raise the bus speed to 230MHZ. (Max it would let me).
    >
    > Results:
    >
    > Bus 200 MHz to 229.4 MHz
    > CPU from 2200 MHz to 2523.4 MHz at 11x Multiplier
    > PCI-E from 100 MHz to 115 MHz
    >
    > Not a great jump, but a good start. Im gonna keep looking to see if I
    > can find anything to raise it up higher.
    >
    > Temp after boost = 40 C
    >
    > Thanks again.


    You were indeed born lucky ! :)

    Paul
     
    Paul, Aug 10, 2008
    #16
  17. Moe Guest

    On Oct 5, 6:19 am, danica <> wrote:
    > Users who overclock their components mainly focus their efforts on
    > processors, video cards, motherboard chipsets, and Random Access Memory
    > (RAM). It is done through manipulating the CPU multiplier and the
    > motherboard's front side bus (FSB) speed until a maximum stable
    > operating frequency is reached. While the idea is simple, variation in
    > the electrical and physical characteristics of computing systems
    > complicates the process.
    >
    > ____________________
    >
    > 'Keyword Search' (http://www.keywordspy.com/keyword-research-tool)
    > 'Blue Cross Blue Shield' (http://www.gohealthinsurance.com)
    >
    > --
    > danica


    NO kidding! What part of our conversation made you think we didn't
    already understand that?
     
    Moe, Nov 13, 2008
    #17
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