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How fast would those old 16-bit chips go if they were made with modernproduction?

Discussion in 'Intel' started by Yousuf Khan, Aug 31, 2008.

  1. Yousuf Khan

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    The old original 8086 & 8088 topped out at 10Mhz (originally produced at
    4.77Mhz). The 80186 & 80188 were the embedded versions of the 808x, but
    otherwise pretty close to identical. Well, it looks like the question
    has been answered: between 55 & 66Mhz.

    EEProductCenter.com :: Intel-compatible processors upgraded to operate
    up to 66 MHz
    "The IA186EB and IA188EB are form, fit, and function compatible with the
    original Intel 80C186EB, 80C188EB, 80L186EB, and 80L188EB 16-bit
    high-integration embedded processors. Additionally, they have been
    upgraded to operate at 5.0V or 3.3V. The Innovasic version operates up
    to 66 MHz at 5.0V and up to 55 MHz at 3.3V."
    http://www.eeproductcenter.com/micro/brief/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=210201596
    Yousuf Khan, Aug 31, 2008
    #1
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  2. Re: How fast would those old 16-bit chips go if they were made withmodern production?

    Yousuf Khan wrote:
    > The old original 8086 & 8088 topped out at 10Mhz (originally produced at
    > 4.77Mhz). The 80186 & 80188 were the embedded versions of the 808x, but
    > otherwise pretty close to identical. Well, it looks like the question
    > has been answered: between 55 & 66Mhz.
    >
    > EEProductCenter.com :: Intel-compatible processors upgraded to operate
    > up to 66 MHz
    > "The IA186EB and IA188EB are form, fit, and function compatible with the
    > original Intel 80C186EB, 80C188EB, 80L186EB, and 80L188EB 16-bit
    > high-integration embedded processors. Additionally, they have been
    > upgraded to operate at 5.0V or 3.3V. The Innovasic version operates up
    > to 66 MHz at 5.0V and up to 55 MHz at 3.3V."
    > http://www.eeproductcenter.com/micro/brief/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=210201596
    >

    I'd be curious to know any further information on the technology used,
    since they don't really mention much in the article. Our 4Mb generation
    was 5.0/3.3, and our 16Mb generation started that way, but once we went
    SDRAM, 5.0 was a thing of the past. Our current technologies have I/Os
    that can live in a 3.3 world, but it's quite painful to deal with such
    high voltages. What a laugh! I remember the rough days of getting down
    to 5.0-only, and the circuit challenges of getting decent performance
    with such low voltages.

    DP
    Dale E. Pontius, Sep 5, 2008
    #2
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