How to find out the real, maximum possible CPU speed (WITHOUT overclocking) ?

Discussion in 'ECS' started by Peter Meister, Nov 23, 2006.

  1. I was running an AMD Athlon CPU on an older Elitegroup motherboard.
    Some diagnostic tools show me a modell 1400 MHz (10.5 x 133) 1600+ for this CPU.

    Then, a week ago, I changed the motherboard to another Elitegroup motherboard (K7S5A).
    Note: I moved the old CPU to the new motherboard as well

    Much to my surprise the same diagnostic tools show now a CPU modell: 1046MHz (10.5 x 100)

    So the CPU modell changes when the underlying motherboard changes ?

    It seems to me that the CPU diagnostic software tools show only the effective Mhz
    But how do I get the real, maximum possible Mhz of the current CPU (WITHOUT Overclocking) ?

    I assume that the new motherboard is setup with FSB of 100 in contrast to 133 on the old motherboard.

    How can I change the FSB from 100 to 133: Is this possible by Software, BIOS or Jumper ?

    How do I find out all possible combinations between CPU speed and FSB speed ?

    Peter
    Peter Meister, Nov 23, 2006
    #1
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  2. Peter Meister

    Buffalo Guest

    "Peter Meister" <> wrote in message
    news:4565d08b$0$27612$-online.net...
    > I was running an AMD Athlon CPU on an older Elitegroup motherboard.
    > Some diagnostic tools show me a modell 1400 MHz (10.5 x 133) 1600+ for this

    CPU.
    >
    > Then, a week ago, I changed the motherboard to another Elitegroup motherboard

    (K7S5A).
    > Note: I moved the old CPU to the new motherboard as well
    >
    > Much to my surprise the same diagnostic tools show now a CPU modell: 1046MHz

    (10.5 x 100)
    >
    > So the CPU modell changes when the underlying motherboard changes ?
    >
    > It seems to me that the CPU diagnostic software tools show only the effective

    Mhz
    > But how do I get the real, maximum possible Mhz of the current CPU (WITHOUT

    Overclocking) ?
    >
    > I assume that the new motherboard is setup with FSB of 100 in contrast to 133

    on the old motherboard.
    >
    > How can I change the FSB from 100 to 133: Is this possible by Software, BIOS

    or Jumper ?
    >
    > How do I find out all possible combinations between CPU speed and FSB speed ?
    >
    > Peter


    It's in the BIOS.
    If you install another BIOS (there are some good ones listed in the Elitegroup
    or HoneyX forums, you will have more speed options.
    I use the HoneyX BIOS and it is excellent.
    I find that the 138/138 speed works the best when dealing with a 133MHz core
    cpu.
    There is a free program called SpeedFan which will allow you to try different
    FSB settings while in Windows with even the original BIOS.
    Buffalo, Nov 26, 2006
    #2
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  3. Peter Meister

    Buffalo Guest

    Look at this link for good info on the K7S5a motherboard:
    http://p199.ezboard.com/bk7s5amotherboardforum

    "Peter Meister" <> wrote in message
    news:4565d08b$0$27612$-online.net...
    > I was running an AMD Athlon CPU on an older Elitegroup motherboard.
    > Some diagnostic tools show me a modell 1400 MHz (10.5 x 133) 1600+ for this

    CPU.
    >
    > Then, a week ago, I changed the motherboard to another Elitegroup motherboard

    (K7S5A).
    > Note: I moved the old CPU to the new motherboard as well
    >
    > Much to my surprise the same diagnostic tools show now a CPU modell: 1046MHz

    (10.5 x 100)
    >
    > So the CPU modell changes when the underlying motherboard changes ?
    >
    > It seems to me that the CPU diagnostic software tools show only the effective

    Mhz
    > But how do I get the real, maximum possible Mhz of the current CPU (WITHOUT

    Overclocking) ?
    >
    > I assume that the new motherboard is setup with FSB of 100 in contrast to 133

    on the old motherboard.
    >
    > How can I change the FSB from 100 to 133: Is this possible by Software, BIOS

    or Jumper ?
    >
    > How do I find out all possible combinations between CPU speed and FSB speed ?
    >
    > Peter
    >
    Buffalo, Nov 26, 2006
    #3
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