How to speed up LAN connections

Discussion in 'ECS' started by JimL, Oct 13, 2003.

  1. JimL

    JimL Guest

    I need help with thruput on my 4 computer LAN.

    I just bought a 10/100mhz router and the K7S5A Pro with 2200 athlon.
    I expected my LAN transfers would really fly with the router replacing
    a 10mhz hub. Not so.

    It takes a good 2 minutes to move 500 files totaling 250 mb from one
    computer to another. What should I look for that is causing this
    bottleneck. I'm running Win2k and Win98SE.

    Jiml
    JimL, Oct 13, 2003
    #1
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  2. JimL

    Kyle Brant Guest

    To test your LAN speed, transfer a large zip file (say 40 meg or
    larger) from one machine to another and use a utility like netpersec
    to monitor the speed of the xfer, you'll have a good feel for your max
    speed then. Also, xfer the file both directions between machines to
    thoroughly test things out. Transferring a large quantity of files
    may simply be an indicator of windows' file system speeds. I get
    pretty good overall LAN speed out of my ver 1 k7s5a (maybe 60mb/sec
    actual on a large file xfer) and I have a crummy no name brand 10/100
    switch. Also consider that the HD speeds of each machine can impact
    network xfer speeds, if you got a slower HD, it just might slow things
    down.

    Another thing to consider: how are you moving these files? Using
    Explorer? or xcopy or what?
    --
    Best regards,
    Kyle
    tired of spam, no email address
    "JimL" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    | I need help with thruput on my 4 computer LAN.
    |
    | I just bought a 10/100mhz router and the K7S5A Pro with 2200
    athlon.
    | I expected my LAN transfers would really fly with the router
    replacing
    | a 10mhz hub. Not so.
    |
    | It takes a good 2 minutes to move 500 files totaling 250 mb from
    one
    | computer to another. What should I look for that is causing this
    | bottleneck. I'm running Win2k and Win98SE.
    |
    | Jiml
    |
    |
    |
    |
    |
    Kyle Brant, Oct 13, 2003
    #2
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  3. JimL

    Tony Sutton Guest

    "JimL" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > I just bought a 10/100mhz router and the K7S5A Pro with 2200 athlon.
    > I expected my LAN transfers would really fly with the router replacing
    > a 10mhz hub. Not so.
    >


    10Mhz? Heh.

    Make sure your operating system are set to use Full Duplex, 100Mbps with the
    100Mbps set (if any) on your router.

    --

    - Tony Sutton
    - http://www.hyperboard.co.uk - The Biggest Message Board!
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    A dragon with THACO -98? It's your turn to go first...
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    Tony Sutton, Oct 13, 2003
    #3
  4. JimL

    Donald Lewis Guest

    On Sun, 12 Oct 2003 18:02:03 -0500, JimL <>
    wrote:

    > I need help with thruput on my 4 computer LAN.
    >
    > I just bought a 10/100mhz router and the K7S5A Pro with 2200 athlon.
    >I expected my LAN transfers would really fly with the router replacing
    >a 10mhz hub. Not so.
    >
    > It takes a good 2 minutes to move 500 files totaling 250 mb from one
    >computer to another.


    Test it with anti-virus utilities disabled. This can make a HUGE
    difference.

    > What should I look for that is causing this
    >bottleneck. I'm running Win2k and Win98SE.
    >
    >Jiml
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Donald Lewis, Oct 14, 2003
    #4
  5. JimL

    JimL Guest

    Thanks guys.

    I forced the boards to 100mbs from autosense and
    it was still very slow.

    I decided to check the wiring on my Cat5 cable and
    sure enough, I had wired them straight through. I have some bought
    patch cables 4 feet long that were wired straight through, so I wired
    my cat5 cable straight through - which was a stupid mistake.
    So I cut off the connectors and rewired them per spec and it really
    helped my transfer speed.

    My old hub would show a yellow light sometimes when transferring
    files, indicating that a retransmission was necessary. I never
    connected the dots with bad wiring, but now I see why it was
    complaining.

    JimL
    JimL, Oct 14, 2003
    #5
  6. JimL

    Bitsbucket Guest

    looking at the connector from the side without the clip......O/S, O, G/S, B,
    B/S, G, B/S, B is the standard cat 5 wiring convention, at least as far as I
    know. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.....
    bitsbucket
    OH, and that is how store bought cables are wired, that is a "patch cable"
    do you mean you needed a "crossover" cable? now that is a different
    story.....

    "JimL" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks guys.
    >
    > I forced the boards to 100mbs from autosense and
    > it was still very slow.
    >
    > I decided to check the wiring on my Cat5 cable and
    > sure enough, I had wired them straight through. I have some bought
    > patch cables 4 feet long that were wired straight through, so I wired
    > my cat5 cable straight through - which was a stupid mistake.
    > So I cut off the connectors and rewired them per spec and it really
    > helped my transfer speed.
    >
    > My old hub would show a yellow light sometimes when transferring
    > files, indicating that a retransmission was necessary. I never
    > connected the dots with bad wiring, but now I see why it was
    > complaining.
    >
    > JimL
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >



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    Bitsbucket, Oct 22, 2003
    #6
  7. JimL

    JimL Guest

    On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 23:30:29 GMT, "Bitsbucket" <>
    wrote:

    >looking at the connector from the side without the clip......O/S, O, G/S, B,
    >B/S, G, B/S, B is the standard cat 5 wiring convention, at least as far as I
    >know. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.....
    >bitsbucket
    >OH, and that is how store bought cables are wired, that is a "patch cable"
    >do you mean you needed a "crossover" cable? now that is a different
    >story.....


    The patch cables I ordered were all straight through. I know that is
    wrong but they were cheap and they work fine. Evidently, 6 feet of
    flat cable will work but not so with 70 foot runs.

    JimL
    JimL, Oct 23, 2003
    #7
  8. JimL

    JT Guest

    On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 07:36:18 -0500, JimL <>
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 23:30:29 GMT, "Bitsbucket" <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>looking at the connector from the side without the clip......O/S, O, G/S, B,
    >>B/S, G, B/S, B is the standard cat 5 wiring convention, at least as far as I
    >>know. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.....
    >>bitsbucket
    >>OH, and that is how store bought cables are wired, that is a "patch cable"
    >>do you mean you needed a "crossover" cable? now that is a different
    >>story.....

    >
    > The patch cables I ordered were all straight through. I know that is
    >wrong but they were cheap and they work fine. Evidently, 6 feet of
    >flat cable will work but not so with 70 foot runs.
    >
    > JimL
    >

    Even at 6' you will get errors, and large transfers will be slower than
    normal. Might not show up at internet speeds that often, but will start to
    show up at 10mbs and will definately be there at 100mbs. The cross talk in
    an improperly made cable will cause packet errors and retries, some of them
    will be pattern or data sensitive and therefore intermittent. When you can
    get properly made cables online for about $2.00, it is a false economy to
    use the wrong cables.

    JT
    JT, Oct 23, 2003
    #8
  9. JimL

    JimL Guest

    On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 13:59:57 GMT, JT <datacare@www> wrote:

    >On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 07:36:18 -0500, JimL <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 23:30:29 GMT, "Bitsbucket" <>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>looking at the connector from the side without the clip......O/S, O, G/S, B,
    >>>B/S, G, B/S, B is the standard cat 5 wiring convention, at least as far as I
    >>>know. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.....
    >>>bitsbucket
    >>>OH, and that is how store bought cables are wired, that is a "patch cable"
    >>>do you mean you needed a "crossover" cable? now that is a different
    >>>story.....

    >>
    >> The patch cables I ordered were all straight through. I know that is
    >>wrong but they were cheap and they work fine. Evidently, 6 feet of
    >>flat cable will work but not so with 70 foot runs.
    >>
    >> JimL
    >>

    >Even at 6' you will get errors, and large transfers will be slower than
    >normal. Might not show up at internet speeds that often, but will start to
    >show up at 10mbs and will definately be there at 100mbs. The cross talk in
    >an improperly made cable will cause packet errors and retries, some of them
    >will be pattern or data sensitive and therefore intermittent. When you can
    >get properly made cables online for about $2.00, it is a false economy to
    >use the wrong cables.
    >
    >JT


    I don't think so.

    At 6 feet, the wires not being twisted just doesn't make a
    difference. Even at 100 mbs.

    JimL
    JimL, Oct 23, 2003
    #9
  10. JimL

    JT Guest

    On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 14:10:14 -0500, JimL <>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 13:59:57 GMT, JT <datacare@www> wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 07:36:18 -0500, JimL <>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 23:30:29 GMT, "Bitsbucket" <>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>looking at the connector from the side without the clip......O/S, O, G/S, B,
    >>>>B/S, G, B/S, B is the standard cat 5 wiring convention, at least as far as I
    >>>>know. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.....
    >>>>bitsbucket
    >>>>OH, and that is how store bought cables are wired, that is a "patch cable"
    >>>>do you mean you needed a "crossover" cable? now that is a different
    >>>>story.....
    >>>
    >>> The patch cables I ordered were all straight through. I know that is
    >>>wrong but they were cheap and they work fine. Evidently, 6 feet of
    >>>flat cable will work but not so with 70 foot runs.
    >>>
    >>> JimL
    >>>

    >>Even at 6' you will get errors, and large transfers will be slower than
    >>normal. Might not show up at internet speeds that often, but will start to
    >>show up at 10mbs and will definately be there at 100mbs. The cross talk in
    >>an improperly made cable will cause packet errors and retries, some of them
    >>will be pattern or data sensitive and therefore intermittent. When you can
    >>get properly made cables online for about $2.00, it is a false economy to
    >>use the wrong cables.
    >>
    >>JT

    >
    > I don't think so.
    >
    > At 6 feet, the wires not being twisted just doesn't make a
    >difference. Even at 100 mbs.
    >
    > JimL


    Hasn't been my experiance. Used to have access to the test equipment to
    show the difference. Have done hundreds, and there twisted pairs eliminate
    crosstalk, and they also reduce problems from items like noisy flourescant
    lamps, cordless phones, baby monitors, CBers in the neighborhood/driving
    by, etc.. Have seen enough strange and random problems with even short
    cables like you are talking about that I won't consider taking such a
    chance. Of course it is your system, and you can take all the chances you
    want, but cables like that are the first thing I replace when there is a
    network problem, and more often than not it is also the last thing
    replaced.

    JT
    JT, Oct 23, 2003
    #10
  11. JimL

    Bitsbucket Guest

    This is why they make cable testers, they are inexpensive, an it tells you
    if your cable is wired right and all the connections are good, No it will
    not tell you about crosstalk, but it will tell you if you have the right
    WORKING cable in the right place. I remember when you had to have
    crossovers, for uplinks, (no "uplink" button) I have seen hubs toasted by
    wrong cables in those days.....if you don't have a cable tester then
    definitely buy your cables pre-made.
    Good Luck
    Bitsbucket.
    "JT" <datacare@www> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 14:10:14 -0500, JimL <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 13:59:57 GMT, JT <datacare@www> wrote:
    > >
    > >>On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 07:36:18 -0500, JimL <>
    > >>wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 23:30:29 GMT, "Bitsbucket" <>
    > >>>wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>>looking at the connector from the side without the clip......O/S, O,

    G/S, B,
    > >>>>B/S, G, B/S, B is the standard cat 5 wiring convention, at least as

    far as I
    > >>>>know. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.....
    > >>>>bitsbucket
    > >>>>OH, and that is how store bought cables are wired, that is a "patch

    cable"
    > >>>>do you mean you needed a "crossover" cable? now that is a different
    > >>>>story.....
    > >>>
    > >>> The patch cables I ordered were all straight through. I know that is
    > >>>wrong but they were cheap and they work fine. Evidently, 6 feet of
    > >>>flat cable will work but not so with 70 foot runs.
    > >>>
    > >>> JimL
    > >>>
    > >>Even at 6' you will get errors, and large transfers will be slower than
    > >>normal. Might not show up at internet speeds that often, but will start

    to
    > >>show up at 10mbs and will definately be there at 100mbs. The cross talk

    in
    > >>an improperly made cable will cause packet errors and retries, some of

    them
    > >>will be pattern or data sensitive and therefore intermittent. When you

    can
    > >>get properly made cables online for about $2.00, it is a false economy

    to
    > >>use the wrong cables.
    > >>
    > >>JT

    > >
    > > I don't think so.
    > >
    > > At 6 feet, the wires not being twisted just doesn't make a
    > >difference. Even at 100 mbs.
    > >
    > > JimL

    >
    > Hasn't been my experiance. Used to have access to the test equipment to
    > show the difference. Have done hundreds, and there twisted pairs eliminate
    > crosstalk, and they also reduce problems from items like noisy flourescant
    > lamps, cordless phones, baby monitors, CBers in the neighborhood/driving
    > by, etc.. Have seen enough strange and random problems with even short
    > cables like you are talking about that I won't consider taking such a
    > chance. Of course it is your system, and you can take all the chances you
    > want, but cables like that are the first thing I replace when there is a
    > network problem, and more often than not it is also the last thing
    > replaced.
    >
    > JT
    >
    >



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    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
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    Bitsbucket, Oct 25, 2003
    #11
  12. JimL

    JT Guest

    On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 01:50:40 GMT, "Bitsbucket" <> wrote:

    >This is why they make cable testers, they are inexpensive, an it tells you
    >if your cable is wired right and all the connections are good, No it will
    >not tell you about crosstalk, but it will tell you if you have the right
    >WORKING cable in the right place. I remember when you had to have
    >crossovers, for uplinks, (no "uplink" button) I have seen hubs toasted by
    >wrong cables in those days.....if you don't have a cable tester then
    >definitely buy your cables pre-made.
    >Good Luck
    >Bitsbucket.

    I second the recomendation for a cable tester. Seen them at the
    surplus/liquidators for around $20, which is money well spent. If you make
    your own cables, follow the color codes, and use a cable tester you will
    normally have few problems. The color code will match the pairs so cross
    talk/interference is minimized, and the cable tester will tell you that you
    made at least an adequate connection. It will also tell you if you got any
    of the wires wrong. If you only need one or two cables, buying premade is
    probably cheaper. I tend to go through about 1000' of cat5e or cat6 a month
    lately, so my milage varies from the norm ;-)

    JT
    JT, Oct 25, 2003
    #12
  13. JimL

    Bitsbucket Guest

    Hi JT,
    I've got 5 1000 foot rolls right now..... :) I run a small computer/network
    company, it's amazing how fast you can go through a thousand feet!

    I don't know about you but my big bitch is that the crimpers seem to wear
    out faster than they should, and at what they cost I hate to throw them
    away, but then you use a worn out one, test the cable, and it's freaking bad
    then you have to go find another set of crimpers, recrimp and then the cable
    is good.....guess I should throw them away, unless you know how to fix 'em?
    I must have 5 pairs of those things, I've tried different brands, and it's
    the same, course I use the crap out of them....after a while they do not
    drive the pins down far enough. I have chipped the cable cutter blade
    before, squeezing the crap out of it, trying to drive the pins down far
    enough!
    bitsbucket
    "JT" <datacare@www> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 01:50:40 GMT, "Bitsbucket" <> wrote:
    >
    > >This is why they make cable testers, they are inexpensive, an it tells

    you
    > >if your cable is wired right and all the connections are good, No it will
    > >not tell you about crosstalk, but it will tell you if you have the right
    > >WORKING cable in the right place. I remember when you had to have
    > >crossovers, for uplinks, (no "uplink" button) I have seen hubs toasted by
    > >wrong cables in those days.....if you don't have a cable tester then
    > >definitely buy your cables pre-made.
    > >Good Luck
    > >Bitsbucket.

    > I second the recomendation for a cable tester. Seen them at the
    > surplus/liquidators for around $20, which is money well spent. If you make
    > your own cables, follow the color codes, and use a cable tester you will
    > normally have few problems. The color code will match the pairs so cross
    > talk/interference is minimized, and the cable tester will tell you that

    you
    > made at least an adequate connection. It will also tell you if you got any
    > of the wires wrong. If you only need one or two cables, buying premade is
    > probably cheaper. I tend to go through about 1000' of cat5e or cat6 a

    month
    > lately, so my milage varies from the norm ;-)
    >
    > JT



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    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
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    Bitsbucket, Oct 25, 2003
    #13
  14. JimL

    JT Guest

    On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 15:27:51 GMT, "Bitsbucket" <> wrote:

    >Hi JT,
    >I've got 5 1000 foot rolls right now..... :) I run a small computer/network
    >company, it's amazing how fast you can go through a thousand feet!
    >
    >I don't know about you but my big bitch is that the crimpers seem to wear
    >out faster than they should, and at what they cost I hate to throw them
    >away, but then you use a worn out one, test the cable, and it's freaking bad
    >then you have to go find another set of crimpers, recrimp and then the cable
    >is good.....guess I should throw them away, unless you know how to fix 'em?
    >I must have 5 pairs of those things, I've tried different brands, and it's
    >the same, course I use the crap out of them....after a while they do not
    >drive the pins down far enough. I have chipped the cable cutter blade
    >before, squeezing the crap out of it, trying to drive the pins down far
    >enough!
    >bitsbucket


    Once in a while you find some with the replaceable blades, and a source
    that stocks them. Cheaper than a new crimper. Of course, not an option with
    the cheapest ones. Set of crimpers last me about a year I guess. Normally
    have 2 or 3 sets around cause I always like to have a spare.

    JT

    JT
    JT, Oct 26, 2003
    #14
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