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HP/Compaq laptop battery and/or charger problem

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by Roger Mills, Aug 14, 2011.

  1. Roger Mills

    Roger Mills Guest

    My 8-year-old HP/Compaq nx9005 laptop has got a completely flat battery
    - or, rather, *two* completely flat batteries, because I bought a new
    one a few years ago and they are now both the same.

    The power arrangements for this laptop are as follows:

    The battery is lithium-ion, 14.8v, 4400mAH (type F4809). It has a row of
    LEDs on the side to indicate the state of charge.

    The mains power supply delivers 18.5vDC through a cylindrical connector,
    which powers the laptop when on mains, and charges the battery via
    circuitry built into the laptop. There is a light on the front of the
    laptop which is amber when the battery is charging, and turns green when
    it is fully charged.

    Well, that's what's *supposed* to happen. What *actually* happens is this:

    If I 'charge' the battery for (say) 24 hours, the lamp is amber for the
    whole time and never turns green. If I remove the battery immediately
    after 'charging', it is stone cold and none of the charge indicator LEDs
    light when the test button is pressed.

    Even after a long charging period, the battery won't start the laptop if
    mains power is not present. If when the laptop is running, mains power
    is removed, it stops dead.

    If I run the laptop without a battery present, the charge lamp flashes
    amber (but is solid amber if a battery is present).

    I have tried putting one of the batteries in the freezer for 2 days, and
    then thawing it and attempting to charge it - all to no avail.

    Sorry for the long pre-amble! My question is this:

    How can I tell whether the problem lies with the battery or with the
    internal charger? Are there any clues in what I have written above? I
    don't mind buying another new battery but, if the charger is duff, I
    will have wasted my money.

    I usually run it on mains anyway, so it's not a total disaster if I
    can't make the battery work - but one does tend to expect a laptop to
    have its own built-in UPS!

    TIA.
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ____________
    Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
    checked.
     
    Roger Mills, Aug 14, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Roger Mills wrote:
    > How can I tell whether the problem lies with the battery or with the
    > internal charger? Are there any clues in what I have written above? I
    > don't mind buying another new battery but, if the charger is duff, I
    > will have wasted my money.
    >
    > I usually run it on mains anyway, so it's not a total disaster if I
    > can't make the battery work - but one does tend to expect a laptop to
    > have its own built-in UPS!
    >
    > TIA.

    I'm 99% certain that the batteries have died due to old age. The
    behaviour of the charging LED suggests that the charging circuitry is
    okay. Most Lithium based batteries I've had in laptops have died after
    no more than four years. I killed one in a few months by just leaving
    the laptop plugged in permanently.

    Two simple ways to make certain, test the battery in another machine,and
    try a working battery in yours. Of course, this does have the
    disadvantage of needing access to a machine that is known to be good.
    --
    Tciao for Now!

    John.
     
    John Williamson, Aug 14, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Roger Mills

    Andy Burns Guest

    John Williamson wrote:

    > Most Lithium based batteries I've had in laptops have died after
    > no more than four years. I killed one in a few months by just leaving
    > the laptop plugged in permanently.


    A recently purchased IdeaPad has an option to keep the battery charged
    to 50% rather than 100%. This is intended in cases where the laptop is
    usually left connected to the charger, which hurts the battery
    longevity, you can untick the setting when you know you will want the
    full 5+ hours battery capacity ...
     
    Andy Burns, Aug 14, 2011
    #3
  4. Roger Mills

    Roger Mills Guest

    On 14/08/2011 22:06, John Williamson wrote:
    > Roger Mills wrote:
    >> How can I tell whether the problem lies with the battery or with the
    >> internal charger? Are there any clues in what I have written above? I
    >> don't mind buying another new battery but, if the charger is duff, I
    >> will have wasted my money.
    >>
    >> I usually run it on mains anyway, so it's not a total disaster if I
    >> can't make the battery work - but one does tend to expect a laptop to
    >> have its own built-in UPS!
    >>
    >> TIA.

    > I'm 99% certain that the batteries have died due to old age. The
    > behaviour of the charging LED suggests that the charging circuitry is
    > okay. Most Lithium based batteries I've had in laptops have died after
    > no more than four years. I killed one in a few months by just leaving
    > the laptop plugged in permanently.
    >

    Thanks. What would the charging LED do if the charger was duff?


    > Two simple ways to make certain, test the battery in another machine,and
    > try a working battery in yours. Of course, this does have the
    > disadvantage of needing access to a machine that is known to be good.


    Not an option, unfortunately. I don't have access to another machine
    which uses the same type of battery - and the only way of getting a
    working battery is to *buy* one - which is what I'm seeking to avoid
    until I'm sure that the charger is ok!
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ____________
    Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
    checked.
     
    Roger Mills, Aug 14, 2011
    #4
  5. Roger Mills wrote:
    > On 14/08/2011 22:06, John Williamson wrote:
    >> Roger Mills wrote:
    >>> How can I tell whether the problem lies with the battery or with the
    >>> internal charger? Are there any clues in what I have written above? I
    >>> don't mind buying another new battery but, if the charger is duff, I
    >>> will have wasted my money.
    >>>
    >>> I usually run it on mains anyway, so it's not a total disaster if I
    >>> can't make the battery work - but one does tend to expect a laptop to
    >>> have its own built-in UPS!
    >>>
    >>> TIA.

    >> I'm 99% certain that the batteries have died due to old age. The
    >> behaviour of the charging LED suggests that the charging circuitry is
    >> okay. Most Lithium based batteries I've had in laptops have died after
    >> no more than four years. I killed one in a few months by just leaving
    >> the laptop plugged in permanently.
    >>

    > Thanks. What would the charging LED do if the charger was duff?
    >

    Stay off, IME. Which model of laptop is it?

    --
    Tciao for Now!

    John.
     
    John Williamson, Aug 15, 2011
    #5
  6. "Roger Mills" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My 8-year-old HP/Compaq nx9005 laptop has got a completely flat battery -
    > or, rather, *two* completely flat batteries, because I bought a new one a
    > few years ago and they are now both the same.
    >
    > The power arrangements for this laptop are as follows:
    >
    > The battery is lithium-ion, 14.8v, 4400mAH (type F4809). It has a row of
    > LEDs on the side to indicate the state of charge.
    >
    > The mains power supply delivers 18.5vDC through a cylindrical connector,
    > which powers the laptop when on mains, and charges the battery via
    > circuitry built into the laptop. There is a light on the front of the
    > laptop which is amber when the battery is charging, and turns green when
    > it is fully charged.
    >
    > Well, that's what's *supposed* to happen. What *actually* happens is this:
    >
    > If I 'charge' the battery for (say) 24 hours, the lamp is amber for the
    > whole time and never turns green. If I remove the battery immediately
    > after 'charging', it is stone cold and none of the charge indicator LEDs
    > light when the test button is pressed.
    >
    > Even after a long charging period, the battery won't start the laptop if
    > mains power is not present. If when the laptop is running, mains power is
    > removed, it stops dead.
    >
    > If I run the laptop without a battery present, the charge lamp flashes
    > amber (but is solid amber if a battery is present).
    >
    > I have tried putting one of the batteries in the freezer for 2 days, and
    > then thawing it and attempting to charge it - all to no avail.
    >
    > Sorry for the long pre-amble! My question is this:
    >
    > How can I tell whether the problem lies with the battery or with the
    > internal charger? Are there any clues in what I have written above? I
    > don't mind buying another new battery but, if the charger is duff, I will
    > have wasted my money.
    >
    > I usually run it on mains anyway, so it's not a total disaster if I can't
    > make the battery work - but one does tend to expect a laptop to have its
    > own built-in UPS!



    After eight years the batteries are well beyond their design life. Indeed
    the machine is as well. You might consider cutting your losses and buy a new
    machine.

    Regards from Peter Crosland
     
    Peter Crosland, Aug 15, 2011
    #6
  7. Roger Mills

    Brian Gaff Guest

    Well, if this situation has been going on for a while, the batteries will
    almost certainly be dead now in any case. They prefer to be left in a semi
    charged state, or they then fail to charge at all when you try to charge
    them after a long period.
    So, it really depends on whether the machine is worth getting fixed if the
    charger is dodgy.
    You would need a new battery in any case I'd think.

    Brian

    --
    Brian Gaff -
    Note:- In order to reduce spam, any email without 'Brian Gaff'
    in the display name may be lost.
    Blind user, so no pictures please!
    "Roger Mills" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My 8-year-old HP/Compaq nx9005 laptop has got a completely flat battery -
    > or, rather, *two* completely flat batteries, because I bought a new one a
    > few years ago and they are now both the same.
    >
    > The power arrangements for this laptop are as follows:
    >
    > The battery is lithium-ion, 14.8v, 4400mAH (type F4809). It has a row of
    > LEDs on the side to indicate the state of charge.
    >
    > The mains power supply delivers 18.5vDC through a cylindrical connector,
    > which powers the laptop when on mains, and charges the battery via
    > circuitry built into the laptop. There is a light on the front of the
    > laptop which is amber when the battery is charging, and turns green when
    > it is fully charged.
    >
    > Well, that's what's *supposed* to happen. What *actually* happens is this:
    >
    > If I 'charge' the battery for (say) 24 hours, the lamp is amber for the
    > whole time and never turns green. If I remove the battery immediately
    > after 'charging', it is stone cold and none of the charge indicator LEDs
    > light when the test button is pressed.
    >
    > Even after a long charging period, the battery won't start the laptop if
    > mains power is not present. If when the laptop is running, mains power is
    > removed, it stops dead.
    >
    > If I run the laptop without a battery present, the charge lamp flashes
    > amber (but is solid amber if a battery is present).
    >
    > I have tried putting one of the batteries in the freezer for 2 days, and
    > then thawing it and attempting to charge it - all to no avail.
    >
    > Sorry for the long pre-amble! My question is this:
    >
    > How can I tell whether the problem lies with the battery or with the
    > internal charger? Are there any clues in what I have written above? I
    > don't mind buying another new battery but, if the charger is duff, I will
    > have wasted my money.
    >
    > I usually run it on mains anyway, so it's not a total disaster if I can't
    > make the battery work - but one does tend to expect a laptop to have its
    > own built-in UPS!
    >
    > TIA.
    > --
    > Cheers,
    > Roger
    > ____________
    > Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
    > checked.
     
    Brian Gaff, Aug 15, 2011
    #7
  8. Roger Mills

    Roger Mills Guest

    On 15/08/2011 07:23, John Williamson wrote:
    > Roger Mills wrote:


    >>>

    >> Thanks. What would the charging LED do if the charger was duff?
    >>

    > Stay off, IME. Which model of laptop is it?
    >


    As per my original post, it's an HP/Compaq nx9005 with an F4809 battery.
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ____________
    Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
    checked.
     
    Roger Mills, Aug 15, 2011
    #8
  9. Roger Mills

    Roger Mills Guest

    On 15/08/2011 07:38, Peter Crosland wrote:

    >
    >
    > After eight years the batteries are well beyond their design life. Indeed
    > the machine is as well. You might consider cutting your losses and buy a new
    > machine.
    >


    The two batteries have been used serially - so that's only 4 years each,
    but even that may be beyond their expected life!

    The laptop has already been pretty much retired, and is mainly only used
    as a standby machine. It had to be pressed into service recently when my
    wife's computer picked up a virus - and she was able to use the laptop
    whilst I sorted her main computer.
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ____________
    Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
    checked.
     
    Roger Mills, Aug 15, 2011
    #9
  10. Roger Mills

    Davey Guest

    On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 21:49:59 +0100
    Roger Mills <> wrote:

    > My 8-year-old HP/Compaq nx9005 laptop has got a completely flat
    > battery
    > - or, rather, *two* completely flat batteries, because I bought a new
    > one a few years ago and they are now both the same.
    >
    > The power arrangements for this laptop are as follows:
    >
    > The battery is lithium-ion, 14.8v, 4400mAH (type F4809). It has a row
    > of LEDs on the side to indicate the state of charge.
    >
    > The mains power supply delivers 18.5vDC through a cylindrical
    > connector, which powers the laptop when on mains, and charges the
    > battery via circuitry built into the laptop. There is a light on the
    > front of the laptop which is amber when the battery is charging, and
    > turns green when it is fully charged.
    >
    > Well, that's what's *supposed* to happen. What *actually* happens is
    > this:
    >
    > If I 'charge' the battery for (say) 24 hours, the lamp is amber for
    > the whole time and never turns green. If I remove the battery
    > immediately after 'charging', it is stone cold and none of the charge
    > indicator LEDs light when the test button is pressed.
    >
    > Even after a long charging period, the battery won't start the laptop
    > if mains power is not present. If when the laptop is running, mains
    > power is removed, it stops dead.
    >
    > If I run the laptop without a battery present, the charge lamp
    > flashes amber (but is solid amber if a battery is present).
    >
    > I have tried putting one of the batteries in the freezer for 2 days,
    > and then thawing it and attempting to charge it - all to no avail.
    >
    > Sorry for the long pre-amble! My question is this:
    >
    > How can I tell whether the problem lies with the battery or with the
    > internal charger? Are there any clues in what I have written above? I
    > don't mind buying another new battery but, if the charger is duff, I
    > will have wasted my money.
    >
    > I usually run it on mains anyway, so it's not a total disaster if I
    > can't make the battery work - but one does tend to expect a laptop to
    > have its own built-in UPS!
    >
    > TIA.


    I have a similar situation to you. My laptop is an nx9010, and I bought
    a new replacement battery just over a year and a half ago. Now it
    behaves exactly as you describe, in every detail, and I also have
    wondered whether it's the battery or the charging system. I shall be
    interested in the conclusion, if any, although I have bought a new
    laptop, which far outstrips the abilities of the Compaq.
    --
    Davey.
     
    Davey, Aug 15, 2011
    #10
  11. Roger Mills

    BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    Peter Crosland wrote:
    > After eight years the batteries are well beyond their design life.
    > Indeed the machine is as well. You might consider cutting your losses
    > and buy a new machine.
    >
    > Regards from Peter Crosland


    I don't know... I don't think the same way about older laptops as you do
    about them. For example I have 10 laptops from 2006 alone.

    3 Gateway MX6124
    6 Gateway M465
    1 Alienware M9700 with two Nvidia 7900 GPU connected in SLI mode

    And I have no interest whatsoever in any newer machines, except my four
    netbooks from 2008. And my fascination with 2006 models is that they are
    at the crossroads between XP, Vista, and Windows 7. And anything newer
    it is hard to find XP drivers if they exist at all. And newer machines
    don't have Cardbus slots anymore.

    The Gateway M465 laptops are very versatile as well. They support
    docking stations, 2 hard drives, 2 batteries, floppy drive and a wide
    range of CPUs work in these things. Thus they can run either 32 bit or
    64 bit OS. And because of the docking station, you don't have to worry
    whether the DC jack works or not. And they came out with either matte or
    glossy, wide or non-wide screens.

    I see 2006 as a great year for computers including laptops. And IMHO
    newer machines just are not as versatile. Heck does any newer laptops
    even support docking stations anymore? Or are they gone too?

    So how long can I use these 2006 laptops? I am not sure. Frankly I am
    surprised they can still keep up with the latest software. Back in 2006,
    I thought 2011 was when I had to give them up and to move on. But 2011
    is here and I might still be using them in 2016. ;-)

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era) - OE-QuoteFix v1.19.2
    Centrino Core Duo 1.83G - 2GB - Windows XP SP3
     
    BillW50, Aug 15, 2011
    #11
  12. Roger Mills wrote:
    > On 15/08/2011 07:23, John Williamson wrote:
    >> Roger Mills wrote:

    >
    >>>>
    >>> Thanks. What would the charging LED do if the charger was duff?
    >>>

    >> Stay off, IME. Which model of laptop is it?
    >>

    >
    > As per my original post, it's an HP/Compaq nx9005 with an F4809 battery.


    I should have re-read the original post, but I'm stuck on a netbook with
    a tiny screen and it's *way* up there^.

    Unfortunately, I don't have one, or one which uses the same battery,so I
    can't offer a spare unit type check.

    --
    Tciao for Now!

    John.
     
    John Williamson, Aug 15, 2011
    #12
  13. Davey wrote:
    > On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 21:49:59 +0100
    > Roger Mills <> wrote:
    >
    >> My 8-year-old HP/Compaq nx9005 laptop has got a completely flat
    >> battery
    >> - or, rather, *two* completely flat batteries, because I bought a new
    >> one a few years ago and they are now both the same.
    >>
    >> The power arrangements for this laptop are as follows:
    >>
    >> The battery is lithium-ion, 14.8v, 4400mAH (type F4809). It has a row
    >> of LEDs on the side to indicate the state of charge.
    >>
    >> The mains power supply delivers 18.5vDC through a cylindrical
    >> connector, which powers the laptop when on mains, and charges the
    >> battery via circuitry built into the laptop. There is a light on the
    >> front of the laptop which is amber when the battery is charging, and
    >> turns green when it is fully charged.
    >>
    >> Well, that's what's *supposed* to happen. What *actually* happens is
    >> this:
    >>
    >> If I 'charge' the battery for (say) 24 hours, the lamp is amber for
    >> the whole time and never turns green. If I remove the battery
    >> immediately after 'charging', it is stone cold and none of the charge
    >> indicator LEDs light when the test button is pressed.
    >>
    >> Even after a long charging period, the battery won't start the laptop
    >> if mains power is not present. If when the laptop is running, mains
    >> power is removed, it stops dead.
    >>
    >> If I run the laptop without a battery present, the charge lamp
    >> flashes amber (but is solid amber if a battery is present).
    >>
    >> I have tried putting one of the batteries in the freezer for 2 days,
    >> and then thawing it and attempting to charge it - all to no avail.
    >>
    >> Sorry for the long pre-amble! My question is this:
    >>
    >> How can I tell whether the problem lies with the battery or with the
    >> internal charger? Are there any clues in what I have written above? I
    >> don't mind buying another new battery but, if the charger is duff, I
    >> will have wasted my money.
    >>
    >> I usually run it on mains anyway, so it's not a total disaster if I
    >> can't make the battery work - but one does tend to expect a laptop to
    >> have its own built-in UPS!
    >>
    >> TIA.

    >
    > I have a similar situation to you. My laptop is an nx9010, and I bought
    > a new replacement battery just over a year and a half ago. Now it
    > behaves exactly as you describe, in every detail, and I also have
    > wondered whether it's the battery or the charging system. I shall be
    > interested in the conclusion, if any, although I have bought a new
    > laptop, which far outstrips the abilities of the Compaq.


    Something I have noticed on my Armada is that aftermarket batteries are
    very variable in quality. I bought a pair, so I could put one in the CD
    drive slot, and one in the normal slot, one lasted a year or two, the
    other failed totally within weeks.

    The both gave symptoms as described when they failed, with the bonus
    that one generated a BIOS error message saying the battery was faulty.

    --
    Tciao for Now!

    John.
     
    John Williamson, Aug 15, 2011
    #13
  14. Roger Mills

    Davey Guest

    On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 16:21:45 +0100
    John Williamson <> wrote:

    > Davey wrote:
    > > On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 21:49:59 +0100
    > > Roger Mills <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> My 8-year-old HP/Compaq nx9005 laptop has got a completely flat
    > >> battery
    > >> - or, rather, *two* completely flat batteries, because I bought a
    > >> new one a few years ago and they are now both the same.
    > >>
    > >> The power arrangements for this laptop are as follows:
    > >>
    > >> The battery is lithium-ion, 14.8v, 4400mAH (type F4809). It has a
    > >> row of LEDs on the side to indicate the state of charge.
    > >>
    > >> The mains power supply delivers 18.5vDC through a cylindrical
    > >> connector, which powers the laptop when on mains, and charges the
    > >> battery via circuitry built into the laptop. There is a light on
    > >> the front of the laptop which is amber when the battery is
    > >> charging, and turns green when it is fully charged.
    > >>
    > >> Well, that's what's *supposed* to happen. What *actually* happens
    > >> is this:
    > >>
    > >> If I 'charge' the battery for (say) 24 hours, the lamp is amber for
    > >> the whole time and never turns green. If I remove the battery
    > >> immediately after 'charging', it is stone cold and none of the
    > >> charge indicator LEDs light when the test button is pressed.
    > >>
    > >> Even after a long charging period, the battery won't start the
    > >> laptop if mains power is not present. If when the laptop is
    > >> running, mains power is removed, it stops dead.
    > >>
    > >> If I run the laptop without a battery present, the charge lamp
    > >> flashes amber (but is solid amber if a battery is present).
    > >>
    > >> I have tried putting one of the batteries in the freezer for 2
    > >> days, and then thawing it and attempting to charge it - all to no
    > >> avail.
    > >>
    > >> Sorry for the long pre-amble! My question is this:
    > >>
    > >> How can I tell whether the problem lies with the battery or with
    > >> the internal charger? Are there any clues in what I have written
    > >> above? I don't mind buying another new battery but, if the charger
    > >> is duff, I will have wasted my money.
    > >>
    > >> I usually run it on mains anyway, so it's not a total disaster if
    > >> I can't make the battery work - but one does tend to expect a
    > >> laptop to have its own built-in UPS!
    > >>
    > >> TIA.

    > >
    > > I have a similar situation to you. My laptop is an nx9010, and I
    > > bought a new replacement battery just over a year and a half ago.
    > > Now it behaves exactly as you describe, in every detail, and I also
    > > have wondered whether it's the battery or the charging system. I
    > > shall be interested in the conclusion, if any, although I have
    > > bought a new laptop, which far outstrips the abilities of the
    > > Compaq.

    >
    > Something I have noticed on my Armada is that aftermarket batteries
    > are very variable in quality. I bought a pair, so I could put one in
    > the CD drive slot, and one in the normal slot, one lasted a year or
    > two, the other failed totally within weeks.
    >
    > The both gave symptoms as described when they failed, with the bonus
    > that one generated a BIOS error message saying the battery was faulty.
    >


    All I got was the information that it was almost fully charged, but it
    wasn't.
    The fact that the LED is alight does tend to indicate that the charging
    system is functioning, rather than the battery. But is could also be
    that the system is overcharging the battery, leading to its early
    demise.
    --
    Davey.
     
    Davey, Aug 15, 2011
    #14
  15. Roger Mills

    Man at B&Q Guest

    On Aug 14, 9:49 pm, Roger Mills <> wrote:
    > My 8-year-old HP/Compaq nx9005 laptop has got a completely flat battery
    > - or, rather, *two* completely flat batteries, because I bought a new
    > one a few years ago and they are now both the same.
    >
    > The power arrangements for this laptop are as follows:
    >
    > The battery is lithium-ion, 14.8v, 4400mAH (type F4809). It has a row of
    > LEDs on the side to indicate the state of charge.
    >
    > The mains power supply delivers 18.5vDC through a cylindrical connector,
    > which powers the laptop when on mains, and charges the battery via
    > circuitry built into the laptop. There is a light on the front of the
    > laptop which is amber when the battery is charging, and turns green when
    > it is fully charged.
    >
    > Well, that's what's *supposed* to happen. What *actually* happens is this:
    >
    > If I 'charge' the battery for (say) 24 hours, the lamp is amber for the
    > whole time and never turns green. If I remove the battery immediately
    > after 'charging', it is stone cold and none of the charge indicator LEDs
    > light when the test button is pressed.
    >
    > Even after a long charging period, the battery won't start the laptop if
    > mains power is not present. If when the laptop is running, mains power
    > is removed, it stops dead.
    >
    > If I run the laptop without a battery present, the charge lamp flashes
    > amber (but is solid amber if a battery is present).
    >
    > I have tried putting one of the batteries in the freezer for 2 days, and
    > then thawing it and attempting to charge it - all to no avail.
    >
    > Sorry for the long pre-amble! My question is this:
    >
    > How can I tell whether the problem lies with the battery or with the
    > internal charger? Are there any clues in what I have written above? I
    > don't mind buying another new battery but, if the charger is duff, I
    > will have wasted my money.
    >
    > I usually run it on mains anyway, so it's not a total disaster if I
    > can't make the battery work - but one does tend to expect a laptop to
    > have its own built-in UPS!
    >
    > TIA.
    > --
    > Cheers,
    > Roger
    > ____________
    > Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
    > checked.


    Can you still get a genuine OEM battery? I would be wary of a cheap
    "replacement".

    If regularly used on mains, take the battery out, as they don't like
    the heat.

    MBQ
     
    Man at B&Q, Aug 15, 2011
    #15
  16. Roger Mills

    AJL Guest

    On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 08:36:29 -0700 (PDT), "Man at B&Q"
    <> wrote:

    >Can you still get a genuine OEM battery? I would be wary of a cheap
    >"replacement".


    One of the problems with the modern Lithium based batteries is that
    they start deteriorating the minute they're manufactured and continue
    to do so throughout their lifetime whether they are used or not.

    So when replacing the battery on an old laptop the problem is to find
    a new battery that was not manufactured 2 years ago (or longer) and
    has been sitting on the shelf ever since waiting to be sold. This
    battery can be sold as new, and comes in a new unopened package, but
    electrically it won't be new.

    For that reason IMO you are better off to go to a high volume battery
    store and get a remanufactured battery with *fresh cells*...
     
    AJL, Aug 15, 2011
    #16
  17. Roger Mills

    ghelf Guest

    "Roger Mills" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My 8-year-old HP/Compaq nx9005 laptop has got a completely flat battery -
    > or, rather, *two* completely flat batteries, because I bought a new one a
    > few years ago and they are now both the same.
    >

    The battery in my HP/Compaq dv9500 was pretty much dead after 3 years. I did
    not want to pay $100 plus for a new battery so I just kept it plugged in.
    After a year I decided I needed the battery. I couldn't believe those $100
    batterys were now selling for $30 on Amazon.com. I bought one and so far
    have no complaints. A few days later I saw a documentary on the problems
    caused by product knockoffs, mostly from China. Laptop batterys were one of
    the products they talked about.
    If my laptop battery is dead within a year I'll know it was probably one of
    those knockoffs.
     
    ghelf, Aug 15, 2011
    #17
  18. Roger Mills

    BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    AJL wrote:
    > On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 08:36:29 -0700 (PDT), "Man at B&Q"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Can you still get a genuine OEM battery? I would be wary of a cheap
    >> "replacement".

    >
    > One of the problems with the modern Lithium based batteries is that
    > they start deteriorating the minute they're manufactured and continue
    > to do so throughout their lifetime whether they are used or not.
    >
    > So when replacing the battery on an old laptop the problem is to find
    > a new battery that was not manufactured 2 years ago (or longer) and
    > has been sitting on the shelf ever since waiting to be sold. This
    > battery can be sold as new, and comes in a new unopened package, but
    > electrically it won't be new.
    >
    > For that reason IMO you are better off to go to a high volume battery
    > store and get a remanufactured battery with *fresh cells*...


    That is all true of course. But I get 10 years out of mine by sitting on
    the shelf. While Barry Watzman got 12 years out of his. You should check
    them every year or two and charge them if the voltage has dropped too
    low. As once they hit something like 3.4 volts per cell, the safety
    circuit might refuse to charge them anymore. As once the cells hit 2.8
    volts per cell, they like to burst into flames if you try to charge
    them.

    So the way I look at it... say a battery was manufactured four to five
    years ago. Anything older probably lost too much of its charge and the
    safety circuits will refuse to charge it. And even being this old and
    treated right, it should last about another 5 to 7 years.

    So I don't know about you, But freshly manufactured laptop Li-Ion
    batteries usually cost like 200 bucks. While Li-Ion batteries which are
    older can be had for about 40 bucks. Remember the sellers are trying to
    get rid of them before they will refuse to charge. As once they get to
    this state, they can't even give them away. So spend 200 bucks and get
    about 10 to 12 years out of it. Or spend about 40 bucks and get 5 to 7
    years out of those. I dunno, I rather go for the older Li-Ion batteries
    if you ask me. ;-)

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era) - OE-QuoteFix v1.19.2
    Centrino Core Duo 1.83G - 2GB - Windows XP SP3
     
    BillW50, Aug 16, 2011
    #18
  19. Roger Mills

    AJL Guest

    On Tue, 16 Aug 2011 07:49:58 -0500, "BillW50" <> wrote:

    >In news:,
    >AJL wrote:
    >> On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 08:36:29 -0700 (PDT), "Man at B&Q"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Can you still get a genuine OEM battery? I would be wary of a cheap
    >>> "replacement".


    >>IMO you are better off to go to a high volume battery
    >> store and get a remanufactured battery with *fresh cells*...

    >
    >That is all true of course. But I get 10 years out of mine by sitting on
    >the shelf. While Barry Watzman got 12 years out of his.


    Yes I do remember those 'who has the oldest battery' campfire stories
    from times past here. Kinda like the mine is bigger than yours? 8-O

    >But freshly manufactured laptop Li-Ion
    >batteries usually cost like 200 bucks.


    Just checked several sites and found batteries for my 4 year old Acer
    laptop (4315) ranging from about US$50 to $100.

    >While Li-Ion batteries which are older can be had for about 40 bucks.


    Cheap is not always better in batteries (though it could be). Problem
    is how do you tell? I would likely go with a branded dealer like
    Duracell.com and pay the price.

    >So spend 200 bucks and get about 10 to 12 years out of it.
    >Or spend about 40 bucks and get 5 to 7 years out of those.


    Other than bragging rights why would you need a 12 year old battery?
     
    AJL, Aug 16, 2011
    #19
  20. Roger Mills

    BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    AJL wrote:
    > On Tue, 16 Aug 2011 07:49:58 -0500, "BillW50" <> wrote:
    >
    >> In news:,
    >> AJL wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 08:36:29 -0700 (PDT), "Man at B&Q"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Can you still get a genuine OEM battery? I would be wary of a cheap
    >>>> "replacement".

    >
    >>> IMO you are better off to go to a high volume battery
    >>> store and get a remanufactured battery with *fresh cells*...

    >>
    >> That is all true of course. But I get 10 years out of mine by
    >> sitting on the shelf. While Barry Watzman got 12 years out of his.

    >
    > Yes I do remember those 'who has the oldest battery' campfire stories
    > from times past here. Kinda like the mine is bigger than yours? 8-O


    Yes, Barry had better luck with his lithium batteries than I. So what
    can I say? lol

    Btw, those 10 year old batteries are now 12 years old and I haven't
    taken out of the drawer in two years. They could be history or they
    might still be good. They fit my 12 year old Toshiba 2595XDVD laptops.
    And they just sit up on the shelf doing nothing, so I really don't care
    if the batteries are still good or not. ;-)

    >> But freshly manufactured laptop Li-Ion
    >> batteries usually cost like 200 bucks.

    >
    > Just checked several sites and found batteries for my 4 year old Acer
    > laptop (4315) ranging from about US$50 to $100.


    Yes, but are those one month old batteries? Or were they manufactured 4
    years ago?

    >> While Li-Ion batteries which are older can be had for about 40 bucks.

    >
    > Cheap is not always better in batteries (though it could be). Problem
    > is how do you tell? I would likely go with a branded dealer like
    > Duracell.com and pay the price.


    Well there are those stories about cheap knockoffs which got into the
    dealers supply chain. Remember those stories a few years back? Things
    like cell phones bursting into flames while they were using them or in
    their pockets.

    Then there was I believe who was Sony, who thought they were clever. As
    they made the battery layers thinner and gave them larger capacity for a
    smaller package. Sounded good on the surface. But the layers were too
    thin and they begun to short internally and burst into flames. I think
    they said that was the largest battery recall in history.

    >> So spend 200 bucks and get about 10 to 12 years out of it.
    >> Or spend about 40 bucks and get 5 to 7 years out of those.

    >
    > Other than bragging rights why would you need a 12 year old battery?


    That is what I am saying. Who cares if the battery was freshly
    manufactured or not? As if an unused five year old battery for 40 bucks
    gives me 6 years of service after I get it. I find that totally
    acceptable. Don't you?

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era) - OE-QuoteFix v1.19.2
    Centrino Core Duo 1.83G - 2GB - Windows XP SP3
     
    BillW50, Aug 16, 2011
    #20
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