HP HDX18-1180ed MaximumGB of RAM

Discussion in 'Asus' started by JoSSo, May 27, 2011.

  1. JoSSo

    JoSSo Guest

    What is the maximum speed of the 4GB memory modules that can be
    installed in this laptop?

    1066 or 1333 MHZ
     
    JoSSo, May 27, 2011
    #1
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  2. JoSSo

    Paul Guest

    JoSSo wrote:
    > What is the maximum speed of the 4GB memory modules that can be
    > installed in this laptop?
    >
    > 1066 or 1333 MHZ


    That machine was actually harder to trace down than I expected.

    I couldn't find the machine listed on Crucial.com
    (But since you own your laptop, you can use the Crucial "system scanner"
    feature, and see if they have the information or not. The system scanner
    may be more accurate.)

    On the Kingston site, they were offering only 800MHz.

    This site says the processor is P8600.

    http://nl.hardware.info/productinfo/55684/hp-hdx18-1180ed#tab:specificaties

    In the block diagram here, that design has the memory controller on the
    chipset. So you need to know more about the "MCH" chip, to know the limits.

    http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?i...essor P8600 (3M Cache, 2.40 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB)

    The chipset could be PM45. But even that information doesn't narrow it
    down, because the PM45 supports DDR3 and DDR2 (just not at the same
    time - they have to select one type when designing the computer).

    Page 13 here shows DDR2(667/800) or DDR3(1066/800) as options for PM45 design.
    So that narrows down the speed a bit.

    http://www.intel.com/Assets/PDF/datasheet/320122.pdf

    OK, I found this brochure from HP.

    HP HDX X18-1180ED Premium Notebook PC
    http://h20195.www2.hp.com/V2/GetPDF.aspx/c01646468.pdf

    Geheugen 4096 MB (2 x 2048 MB)
    Ondersteunt tot 8 GB DDR3-geheugen

    So it is using DDR3 memory. The Kingston product offered for the machine
    is DDR2. Very confusing! I still cannot be positive of the type of memory.

    I suggest you run CPUZ, and verify the hardware information from
    inside the computer.

    http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html

    CPUZ will show you a memory tab window similar to this, and then
    you can determine if it is DDR2 type or DDR3 type.

    http://www.cpuid.com/medias/images/en/softwares-cpuz-04.jpg

    In terms of performance, the processor FSB could be running at FSB1066.
    That is 1066*8 = 8500 MB/sec. Two modules run in dual channel mode,
    whether DDR2-800 or DDR3-800, would be 2*6400MB/sec or 12800MB/sec, so even
    with relatively slow-sounding memory type, the memory subsystem is
    still faster than the FSB. The FSB is the bottleneck.

    You can generally use a faster memory type in a slower computer, as
    the module speed can be operated over a range of values. But there
    wouldn't be any advantage to you, to using fast modules.

    If this was my computer, the next step would be using CPUZ. Since
    the HP brochure doesn't agree with the Kingston page, you need to
    confirm the memory type (DDR2 or DDR3) first. If the machine was
    using DDR3, the fastest DDR3 for PM45 is DDR3-1066.

    Paul
     
    Paul, May 27, 2011
    #2
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  3. JoSSo

    JoSSo Guest

    Tanx,

    Yes it is using DDR3, currently running 2*2GB 1066 MHZ DDR3.
    So upgrading to 2 * 4GB on 1066 is possible.

    However will it run with 2 * 4GB 1330 MHz?

    Gr
    Jos


    On Fri, 27 May 2011 05:35:02 -0400, Paul <> wrote:

    >JoSSo wrote:
    >> What is the maximum speed of the 4GB memory modules that can be
    >> installed in this laptop?
    >>
    >> 1066 or 1333 MHZ

    >
    >That machine was actually harder to trace down than I expected.
    >
    >I couldn't find the machine listed on Crucial.com
    >(But since you own your laptop, you can use the Crucial "system scanner"
    >feature, and see if they have the information or not. The system scanner
    >may be more accurate.)
    >
    >On the Kingston site, they were offering only 800MHz.
    >
    >This site says the processor is P8600.
    >
    >http://nl.hardware.info/productinfo/55684/hp-hdx18-1180ed#tab:specificaties
    >
    >In the block diagram here, that design has the memory controller on the
    >chipset. So you need to know more about the "MCH" chip, to know the limits.
    >
    >http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?i...essor P8600 (3M Cache, 2.40 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB)
    >
    >The chipset could be PM45. But even that information doesn't narrow it
    >down, because the PM45 supports DDR3 and DDR2 (just not at the same
    >time - they have to select one type when designing the computer).
    >
    >Page 13 here shows DDR2(667/800) or DDR3(1066/800) as options for PM45 design.
    >So that narrows down the speed a bit.
    >
    >http://www.intel.com/Assets/PDF/datasheet/320122.pdf
    >
    >OK, I found this brochure from HP.
    >
    >HP HDX X18-1180ED Premium Notebook PC
    >http://h20195.www2.hp.com/V2/GetPDF.aspx/c01646468.pdf
    >
    > Geheugen 4096 MB (2 x 2048 MB)
    > Ondersteunt tot 8 GB DDR3-geheugen
    >
    >So it is using DDR3 memory. The Kingston product offered for the machine
    >is DDR2. Very confusing! I still cannot be positive of the type of memory.
    >
    >I suggest you run CPUZ, and verify the hardware information from
    >inside the computer.
    >
    >http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html
    >
    >CPUZ will show you a memory tab window similar to this, and then
    >you can determine if it is DDR2 type or DDR3 type.
    >
    >http://www.cpuid.com/medias/images/en/softwares-cpuz-04.jpg
    >
    >In terms of performance, the processor FSB could be running at FSB1066.
    >That is 1066*8 = 8500 MB/sec. Two modules run in dual channel mode,
    >whether DDR2-800 or DDR3-800, would be 2*6400MB/sec or 12800MB/sec, so even
    >with relatively slow-sounding memory type, the memory subsystem is
    >still faster than the FSB. The FSB is the bottleneck.
    >
    >You can generally use a faster memory type in a slower computer, as
    >the module speed can be operated over a range of values. But there
    >wouldn't be any advantage to you, to using fast modules.
    >
    >If this was my computer, the next step would be using CPUZ. Since
    >the HP brochure doesn't agree with the Kingston page, you need to
    >confirm the memory type (DDR2 or DDR3) first. If the machine was
    >using DDR3, the fastest DDR3 for PM45 is DDR3-1066.
    >
    > Paul
     
    JoSSo, May 27, 2011
    #3
  4. JoSSo

    Paul Guest

    JoSSo wrote:
    > Tanx,
    >
    > Yes it is using DDR3, currently running 2*2GB 1066 MHZ DDR3.
    > So upgrading to 2 * 4GB on 1066 is possible.
    >
    > However will it run with 2 * 4GB 1330 MHz?
    >
    > Gr
    > Jos


    That is a function of the chipset.

    Is the chipset PM45 ?

    If it is PM45, you can read about it here. The block diagram
    says DDR3-1066 is the fastest speed PM45 can run (page 13).

    http://www.intel.com/Assets/PDF/datasheet/320122.pdf

    If you install DDR3-1333, and the chipset cannot run
    that fast, then it will run the memory at DDR3-1066 instead.

    Paul
     
    Paul, May 27, 2011
    #4
  5. JoSSo

    JoSSo Guest

    Paul,

    Yes, it is.

    Gr
    Jos

    On Fri, 27 May 2011 05:59:11 -0400, Paul <> wrote:

    >JoSSo wrote:
    >> Tanx,
    >>
    >> Yes it is using DDR3, currently running 2*2GB 1066 MHZ DDR3.
    >> So upgrading to 2 * 4GB on 1066 is possible.
    >>
    >> However will it run with 2 * 4GB 1330 MHz?
    >>
    >> Gr
    >> Jos

    >
    >That is a function of the chipset.
    >
    >Is the chipset PM45 ?
    >
    >If it is PM45, you can read about it here. The block diagram
    >says DDR3-1066 is the fastest speed PM45 can run (page 13).
    >
    >http://www.intel.com/Assets/PDF/datasheet/320122.pdf
    >
    >If you install DDR3-1333, and the chipset cannot run
    >that fast, then it will run the memory at DDR3-1066 instead.
    >
    > Paul
     
    JoSSo, May 27, 2011
    #5
  6. JoSSo

    JoSSo Guest

    Paul,

    Heaps of information. Tanx for that, again. I am running Windows 7 64
    bit. So that is not the problem.

    Gr
    Jos

    On Fri, 27 May 2011 12:21:07 -0400, Paul <> wrote:

    >JoSSo wrote:
    >> Paul,
    >>
    >> Yes, it is.
    >>
    >> Gr
    >> Jos

    >
    >Fortunately for you, HP mentions the possibility of supporting 8GB total,
    >so your installation may work. The way this is stated, means at the
    >time of manufacture, the laptop may have been verified in the
    >lab with 2GB modules. But the hardware supports 4GB modules. If
    >you encounter trouble, then look for a BIOS update from HP.
    >
    >http://h20195.www2.hp.com/V2/GetPDF.aspx/c01646468.pdf
    >
    > Memory 4096 MB (2 x 2048 MB)
    > Supports up to 8 GB of DDR3 memory <----
    >
    >To take advantage of the total amount of memory, you'll need
    >an x64 installation of the operating system.
    >
    >When the new memory is installed, you can use memtest86+ to
    >do an initial check that the memory is working. The test pattern
    >you observe, while it's testing, shows how the memory is mapped
    >(leaving space between 3GB and 4GB for hardware bus addresses).
    >
    >http://www.memtest.org/
    >
    >Scroll half way down that web page, to find the downloadable software.
    >
    >If the memory completes a couple passes with that tool error free,
    >then it is safe to boot into Windows.
    >
    >Once in Windows, further testing should be carried out, with a
    >stress tester. The reason that is necessary, is because memtest86+
    >doesn't do a good job of stressing the hardware and uncovering all
    >possible transient faults. And sitting idle in the desktop, it
    >takes hundreds of hours of runtime, to spot even one error. A stress
    >tester program, reduces that discovery time to only a few hours.
    >
    >I use Prime95 from mersenne.org/freesoft for that, but considering
    >your machine will have 8GB, it's getting a bit difficult to
    >cover all of the memory. You can run multiple copies of Prime95
    >on a computer, but I've noticed instability in Windows when I do that.
    >It just doesn't like to run too many copies, even when memory
    >management should be allowing it. Those tests were done on WinXP.
    >Perhaps Vista/Windows7/x64 will behave better ?
    >
    >HTH,
    > Paul
    >
    >>
    >> On Fri, 27 May 2011 05:59:11 -0400, Paul <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> JoSSo wrote:
    >>>> Tanx,
    >>>>
    >>>> Yes it is using DDR3, currently running 2*2GB 1066 MHZ DDR3.
    >>>> So upgrading to 2 * 4GB on 1066 is possible.
    >>>>
    >>>> However will it run with 2 * 4GB 1330 MHz?
    >>>>
    >>>> Gr
    >>>> Jos
    >>> That is a function of the chipset.
    >>>
    >>> Is the chipset PM45 ?
    >>>
    >>> If it is PM45, you can read about it here. The block diagram
    >>> says DDR3-1066 is the fastest speed PM45 can run (page 13).
    >>>
    >>> http://www.intel.com/Assets/PDF/datasheet/320122.pdf
    >>>
    >>> If you install DDR3-1333, and the chipset cannot run
    >>> that fast, then it will run the memory at DDR3-1066 instead.
    >>>
    >>> Paul
     
    JoSSo, May 27, 2011
    #6
  7. JoSSo

    JoSSo Guest

    Paul,

    Some info:
    Processors Information
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Processor 1 ID = 0
    Number of cores 2 (max 2)
    Number of threads 2 (max 2)
    Name Intel Mobile Core 2 Duo P8600
    Codename Penryn
    Specification Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU P8600 @
    2.40GHz
    Package (platform ID) Socket P (478) (0x7)
    CPUID 6.7.6
    Extended CPUID 6.17
    Core Stepping M0
    Technology 45 nm
    Core Speed 2393.2 MHz
    Multiplier x FSB 9.0 x 265.9 MHz
    Rated Bus speed 1063.6 MHz
    Stock frequency 2400 MHz
    Instructions sets MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4.1,
    EM64T, VT-x
    L1 Data cache 2 x 32 KBytes, 8-way set associative,
    64-byte line size
    L1 Instruction cache 2 x 32 KBytes, 8-way set associative,
    64-byte line size
    L2 cache 3072 KBytes, 12-way set associative,
    64-byte line size
    FID/VID Control yes
    FID range 6.0x - 9.0x
    Max VID 1.138 V

    Chipset
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Northbridge Intel PM45 rev. 07
    Southbridge Intel 82801IM (ICH9-M) rev. 03
    Graphic Interface PCI-Express
    PCI-E Link Width x16
    PCI-E Max Link Width x16
    Memory Type DDR3
    Memory Size 4096 MBytes
    Channels Dual, (Symmetric)
    Memory Frequency 531.8 MHz (1:2)
    CAS# latency (CL) 7.0
    RAS# to CAS# delay (tRCD) 7
    RAS# Precharge (tRP) 7
    Cycle Time (tRAS) 20
    MCHBAR I/O Base address 0x0FED10000
    MCHBAR I/O Size 4096

    Memory SPD
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    DIMM # 1
    SMBus address 0x50
    Memory type DDR3
    Module format SO-DIMM
    Manufacturer (ID) Micron Technology (2C00000000000000)
    Size 2048 MBytes
    Max bandwidth PC3-8500F (533 MHz)
    Part number 16JSF25664HY-1G1D1
    Serial number D842BEC2
    Manufacturing date Week 47/Year 08
    Number of banks 8
    Nominal Voltage 1.50 Volts
    EPP no
    XMP no
    JEDEC timings table CL-tRCD-tRP-tRAS-tRC @ frequency
    JEDEC #1 6.0-6-6-18-24 @ 457 MHz
    JEDEC #2 7.0-7-7-20-27 @ 533 MHz
    JEDEC #3 8.0-8-8-23-31 @ 609 MHz

    DIMM # 2
    SMBus address 0x52
    Memory type DDR3
    Module format SO-DIMM
    Manufacturer (ID) Micron Technology (2C00000000000000)
    Size 2048 MBytes
    Max bandwidth PC3-8500F (533 MHz)
    Part number 16JSF25664HY-1G1D1
    Serial number D842BECC
    Manufacturing date Week 47/Year 08
    Number of banks 8
    Nominal Voltage 1.50 Volts
    EPP no
    XMP no
    JEDEC timings table CL-tRCD-tRP-tRAS-tRC @ frequency
    JEDEC #1 6.0-6-6-18-24 @ 457 MHz
    JEDEC #2 7.0-7-7-20-27 @ 533 MHz
    JEDEC #3 8.0-8-8-23-31 @ 609 MHz
    Gr
    Jos




    On Fri, 27 May 2011 12:21:07 -0400, Paul <> wrote:

    >JoSSo wrote:
    >> Paul,
    >>
    >> Yes, it is.
    >>
    >> Gr
    >> Jos

    >
    >Fortunately for you, HP mentions the possibility of supporting 8GB total,
    >so your installation may work. The way this is stated, means at the
    >time of manufacture, the laptop may have been verified in the
    >lab with 2GB modules. But the hardware supports 4GB modules. If
    >you encounter trouble, then look for a BIOS update from HP.
    >
    >http://h20195.www2.hp.com/V2/GetPDF.aspx/c01646468.pdf
    >
    > Memory 4096 MB (2 x 2048 MB)
    > Supports up to 8 GB of DDR3 memory <----
    >
    >To take advantage of the total amount of memory, you'll need
    >an x64 installation of the operating system.
    >
    >When the new memory is installed, you can use memtest86+ to
    >do an initial check that the memory is working. The test pattern
    >you observe, while it's testing, shows how the memory is mapped
    >(leaving space between 3GB and 4GB for hardware bus addresses).
    >
    >http://www.memtest.org/
    >
    >Scroll half way down that web page, to find the downloadable software.
    >
    >If the memory completes a couple passes with that tool error free,
    >then it is safe to boot into Windows.
    >
    >Once in Windows, further testing should be carried out, with a
    >stress tester. The reason that is necessary, is because memtest86+
    >doesn't do a good job of stressing the hardware and uncovering all
    >possible transient faults. And sitting idle in the desktop, it
    >takes hundreds of hours of runtime, to spot even one error. A stress
    >tester program, reduces that discovery time to only a few hours.
    >
    >I use Prime95 from mersenne.org/freesoft for that, but considering
    >your machine will have 8GB, it's getting a bit difficult to
    >cover all of the memory. You can run multiple copies of Prime95
    >on a computer, but I've noticed instability in Windows when I do that.
    >It just doesn't like to run too many copies, even when memory
    >management should be allowing it. Those tests were done on WinXP.
    >Perhaps Vista/Windows7/x64 will behave better ?
    >
    >HTH,
    > Paul
    >
    >>
    >> On Fri, 27 May 2011 05:59:11 -0400, Paul <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> JoSSo wrote:
    >>>> Tanx,
    >>>>
    >>>> Yes it is using DDR3, currently running 2*2GB 1066 MHZ DDR3.
    >>>> So upgrading to 2 * 4GB on 1066 is possible.
    >>>>
    >>>> However will it run with 2 * 4GB 1330 MHz?
    >>>>
    >>>> Gr
    >>>> Jos
    >>> That is a function of the chipset.
    >>>
    >>> Is the chipset PM45 ?
    >>>
    >>> If it is PM45, you can read about it here. The block diagram
    >>> says DDR3-1066 is the fastest speed PM45 can run (page 13).
    >>>
    >>> http://www.intel.com/Assets/PDF/datasheet/320122.pdf
    >>>
    >>> If you install DDR3-1333, and the chipset cannot run
    >>> that fast, then it will run the memory at DDR3-1066 instead.
    >>>
    >>> Paul
     
    JoSSo, May 28, 2011
    #7
  8. JoSSo

    Paul Guest

    JoSSo wrote:
    > Paul,
    >
    > Some info:
    > Processors Information
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Processor 1 ID = 0
    > Number of cores 2 (max 2)
    > Number of threads 2 (max 2)
    > Name Intel Mobile Core 2 Duo P8600
    > Codename Penryn
    > Specification Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU P8600 @
    > 2.40GHz
    > Package (platform ID) Socket P (478) (0x7)
    > CPUID 6.7.6
    > Extended CPUID 6.17
    > Core Stepping M0
    > Technology 45 nm
    > Core Speed 2393.2 MHz
    > Multiplier x FSB 9.0 x 265.9 MHz
    > Rated Bus speed 1063.6 MHz
    > Stock frequency 2400 MHz
    > Instructions sets MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4.1,
    > EM64T, VT-x
    > L1 Data cache 2 x 32 KBytes, 8-way set associative,
    > 64-byte line size
    > L1 Instruction cache 2 x 32 KBytes, 8-way set associative,
    > 64-byte line size
    > L2 cache 3072 KBytes, 12-way set associative,
    > 64-byte line size
    > FID/VID Control yes
    > FID range 6.0x - 9.0x
    > Max VID 1.138 V
    >
    > Chipset
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Northbridge Intel PM45 rev. 07
    > Southbridge Intel 82801IM (ICH9-M) rev. 03
    > Graphic Interface PCI-Express
    > PCI-E Link Width x16
    > PCI-E Max Link Width x16
    > Memory Type DDR3
    > Memory Size 4096 MBytes
    > Channels Dual, (Symmetric)
    > Memory Frequency 531.8 MHz (1:2)
    > CAS# latency (CL) 7.0
    > RAS# to CAS# delay (tRCD) 7
    > RAS# Precharge (tRP) 7
    > Cycle Time (tRAS) 20
    > MCHBAR I/O Base address 0x0FED10000
    > MCHBAR I/O Size 4096
    >
    > Memory SPD
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > DIMM # 1
    > SMBus address 0x50
    > Memory type DDR3
    > Module format SO-DIMM
    > Manufacturer (ID) Micron Technology (2C00000000000000)
    > Size 2048 MBytes
    > Max bandwidth PC3-8500F (533 MHz)
    > Part number 16JSF25664HY-1G1D1
    > Serial number D842BEC2
    > Manufacturing date Week 47/Year 08
    > Number of banks 8
    > Nominal Voltage 1.50 Volts
    > EPP no
    > XMP no
    > JEDEC timings table CL-tRCD-tRP-tRAS-tRC @ frequency
    > JEDEC #1 6.0-6-6-18-24 @ 457 MHz
    > JEDEC #2 7.0-7-7-20-27 @ 533 MHz
    > JEDEC #3 8.0-8-8-23-31 @ 609 MHz
    >
    > DIMM # 2
    > SMBus address 0x52
    > Memory type DDR3
    > Module format SO-DIMM
    > Manufacturer (ID) Micron Technology (2C00000000000000)
    > Size 2048 MBytes
    > Max bandwidth PC3-8500F (533 MHz)
    > Part number 16JSF25664HY-1G1D1
    > Serial number D842BECC
    > Manufacturing date Week 47/Year 08
    > Number of banks 8
    > Nominal Voltage 1.50 Volts
    > EPP no
    > XMP no
    > JEDEC timings table CL-tRCD-tRP-tRAS-tRC @ frequency
    > JEDEC #1 6.0-6-6-18-24 @ 457 MHz
    > JEDEC #2 7.0-7-7-20-27 @ 533 MHz
    > JEDEC #3 8.0-8-8-23-31 @ 609 MHz
    > Gr
    > Jos


    So it is currently running DDR3-1066 and according to the Intel datasheet,
    that is as fast as PM45 goes (stock settings). Laptops don't generally
    have provisions for overclocking, because that would affect battery
    life.

    Your memory subsystem is already pretty good. How will this change
    from 4GB @ DDR3-1066 to 8GB @ DDR3-1066 pay off ? Do you use a lot
    of Virtual Machines ? Are you using a RAM Disk ? There are people
    who do simulations who need lots of RAM, but for a lot of other things,
    you might not be able to tell the difference when the new RAM is installed.

    http://memory.dataram.com/products-and-services/software/ramdisk

    When I changed my current computer from 2GB to 4GB, the main benefit
    was I was able to run three virtual machines at the same time. For most
    other operations of the computer, the extra RAM made no difference.

    Paul
     
    Paul, May 28, 2011
    #8
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