Inspiron Laptop. Applet to Measure CPU's Temperature?

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Monica, Dec 31, 2010.

  1. Monica

    Monica Guest

    I'm getting all freaked out from reading about heat, laptops and their
    batteries :eek: And I'm guessing just the nature of the beast doesn't allow
    for easy access and switching parts as a desktop model does. I'm used to
    getting in there and cleaning house, replacing and upgrading parts.
    Frankly, I'm a bit intimidated by this new laptop. MUST keep it in tip top
    shape :) I thought I came across an applet that measured my system's
    temperature but can't find it again.
    Dell Inspiron N5010, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit. Does anyone know if I
    actually saw this or not?

    And another thing...over the years of listening to friends with laptops, it
    seems that the adapter cord, where it plugs into the computer, tends to
    break. Is it due to the curve in the cord and pull that might be on it or
    people pulling the cord out wrong? Would wrapping with electrical tape or
    using a popcicle stick as a brace and then wrapping it about 5" down the
    cord help?
    Monica
     
    Monica, Dec 31, 2010
    #1
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  2. Monica

    Alan Guest

    Try this to monitor the CPU(s),

    http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/

    I have it on a variety of desktop and laptop machines, with 32 and 64
    bit OS versions. Works fine on all of them.


    --
    Alan
     
    Alan, Dec 31, 2010
    #2
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  3. Monica

    Monica Guest

    Thank you for replying Alan. I had installed the All CPU Meter gadget last
    night and this Core Temp has to be installed and running for All Core to
    read the temperature so I installed that last night too. Without fan
    running, temps are 53+/-. With fan 43+/- Sitting on a desk. Are these
    average (safe) temps?
    Monica

    "Alan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Try this to monitor the CPU(s),
    >
    > http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/
    >
    > I have it on a variety of desktop and laptop machines, with 32 and 64
    > bit OS versions. Works fine on all of them.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Alan
     
    Monica, Dec 31, 2010
    #3
  4. Monica

    Monica Guest

    of course that's Celsius

    "Monica" <> wrote in message
    news:L9rTo.70449$...
    > Thank you for replying Alan. I had installed the All CPU Meter gadget
    > last night and this Core Temp has to be installed and running for All Core
    > to read the temperature so I installed that last night too. Without fan
    > running, temps are 53+/-. With fan 43+/- Sitting on a desk. Are these
    > average (safe) temps?
    > Monica
    >
    > "Alan" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Try this to monitor the CPU(s),
    >>
    >> http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/
    >>
    >> I have it on a variety of desktop and laptop machines, with 32 and 64
    >> bit OS versions. Works fine on all of them.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Alan

    >
     
    Monica, Dec 31, 2010
    #4
  5. Monica

    mm Guest

    On Thu, 30 Dec 2010 23:45:30 -0600, "Monica" <>
    wrote:

    >I'm getting all freaked out from reading about heat, laptops and their
    >batteries :eek: And I'm guessing just the nature of the beast doesn't allow
    >for easy access and switching parts as a desktop model does. I'm used to
    >getting in there and cleaning house, replacing and upgrading parts.
    >Frankly, I'm a bit intimidated by this new laptop. MUST keep it in tip top
    >shape :) I thought I came across an applet that measured my system's
    >temperature but can't find it again.
    >Dell Inspiron N5010, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit. Does anyone know if I
    >actually saw this or not?


    I've been using Asus-Probe, not on a Dell but on an Asus, and not on a
    laptop, but I think it works on other computers too. I found it on
    the web (not to be confused with Asus Probe NB), but if you don't,
    I'll send you a copy.

    >And another thing...over the years of listening to friends with laptops, it
    >seems that the adapter cord, where it plugs into the computer, tends to
    >break. Is it due to the curve in the cord and pull that might be on it or
    >people pulling the cord out wrong? Would wrapping with electrical tape or
    >using a popcicle stick as a brace and then wrapping it about 5" down the
    >cord help?


    Yes that would help. Wnen a plug fails, you can also cut off the
    old plug** and attach a new one. It's very easy, and plugs are
    available at hardware stores and their recent imitators.

    Do you or someone you know have a voltmeter, a voltohmeter, or a
    mulitmeter. Usually they are the same thing. You can measure
    electrical continuity from each prong of the plug to each of the
    copper holes at the other end, the end that goes into the brick.
    Unplug the cord from the wall first, of course and the resistance for
    each wire should be zero or just about. If neither is like that,
    you're doing something wrong, but if one is like that and the other is
    very high, or a digital meter shows a 1, then that wire is broken.

    If you're not sure, cut the plug off and leave a couple inches of wire
    on it, so you can reuse the plug later if it turns out to be good.

    Where you cut, separate the two wire from each other going back about
    1" (that's an inch, not celsius) strip the rubber off of 1/2", leaving
    the copper underneath, and attach the plug by tightening the screws.
    Some plugs go on without stripping the wires, but I think the cords
    from computers are usually too thick to fit in to their holes.

    >Monica
    >
     
    mm, Jan 6, 2011
    #5
  6. Monica

    Monica Guest

    Thanks for all that helpful information :)
    Yes, we do have a multimeter and will keep this information in case I ever
    need it :)
    Can you, or anyone, tell me what a good/safe temp would be for
    a dual core, 2.53 ghz laptop while doing normal email and web browsing?
    The laptop fan rarely kicks on since getting the cooling pad and the Core
    Temp
    is reporting temps that range from (core 0) low 40s to upper 50s and (core
    1) mid 20s to mid 40s Celsius.
    Is this within normal range?
    Monica


    "mm" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 30 Dec 2010 23:45:30 -0600, "Monica" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I'm getting all freaked out from reading about heat, laptops and their
    >>batteries :eek: And I'm guessing just the nature of the beast doesn't allow
    >>for easy access and switching parts as a desktop model does. I'm used to
    >>getting in there and cleaning house, replacing and upgrading parts.
    >>Frankly, I'm a bit intimidated by this new laptop. MUST keep it in tip
    >>top
    >>shape :) I thought I came across an applet that measured my system's
    >>temperature but can't find it again.
    >>Dell Inspiron N5010, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit. Does anyone know if I
    >>actually saw this or not?

    >
    > I've been using Asus-Probe, not on a Dell but on an Asus, and not on a
    > laptop, but I think it works on other computers too. I found it on
    > the web (not to be confused with Asus Probe NB), but if you don't,
    > I'll send you a copy.
    >
    >>And another thing...over the years of listening to friends with laptops,
    >>it
    >>seems that the adapter cord, where it plugs into the computer, tends to
    >>break. Is it due to the curve in the cord and pull that might be on it or
    >>people pulling the cord out wrong? Would wrapping with electrical tape or
    >>using a popcicle stick as a brace and then wrapping it about 5" down the
    >>cord help?

    >
    > Yes that would help. Wnen a plug fails, you can also cut off the
    > old plug** and attach a new one. It's very easy, and plugs are
    > available at hardware stores and their recent imitators.
    >
    > Do you or someone you know have a voltmeter, a voltohmeter, or a
    > mulitmeter. Usually they are the same thing. You can measure
    > electrical continuity from each prong of the plug to each of the
    > copper holes at the other end, the end that goes into the brick.
    > Unplug the cord from the wall first, of course and the resistance for
    > each wire should be zero or just about. If neither is like that,
    > you're doing something wrong, but if one is like that and the other is
    > very high, or a digital meter shows a 1, then that wire is broken.
    >
    > If you're not sure, cut the plug off and leave a couple inches of wire
    > on it, so you can reuse the plug later if it turns out to be good.
    >
    > Where you cut, separate the two wire from each other going back about
    > 1" (that's an inch, not celsius) strip the rubber off of 1/2", leaving
    > the copper underneath, and attach the plug by tightening the screws.
    > Some plugs go on without stripping the wires, but I think the cords
    > from computers are usually too thick to fit in to their holes.
    >
    >>Monica
    >>

    >
     
    Monica, Jan 7, 2011
    #6
  7. Monica

    mm Guest

    On Fri, 7 Jan 2011 01:54:19 -0600, "Monica" <>
    wrote:

    >Thanks for all that helpful information :)
    >Yes, we do have a multimeter and will keep this information in case I ever
    >need it :)
    >Can you, or anyone, tell me what a good/safe temp would be for
    >a dual core, 2.53 ghz laptop while doing normal email and web browsing?
    >The laptop fan rarely kicks on since getting the cooling pad and the Core
    >Temp
    >is reporting temps that range from (core 0) low 40s to upper 50s and (core
    >1) mid 20s to mid 40s Celsius.
    >Is this within normal range?
    >Monica


    I don't use my temp probe since the summer ended, but this might be a
    quetsion better suited to a laptop ng or a hardware one
    >
    >
    >"mm" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Thu, 30 Dec 2010 23:45:30 -0600, "Monica" <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I'm getting all freaked out from reading about heat, laptops and their
    >>>batteries :eek: And I'm guessing just the nature of the beast doesn't allow
    >>>for easy access and switching parts as a desktop model does. I'm used to
    >>>getting in there and cleaning house, replacing and upgrading parts.
    >>>Frankly, I'm a bit intimidated by this new laptop. MUST keep it in tip
    >>>top
    >>>shape :) I thought I came across an applet that measured my system's
    >>>temperature but can't find it again.
    >>>Dell Inspiron N5010, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit. Does anyone know if I
    >>>actually saw this or not?

    >>
    >> I've been using Asus-Probe, not on a Dell but on an Asus, and not on a
    >> laptop, but I think it works on other computers too. I found it on
    >> the web (not to be confused with Asus Probe NB), but if you don't,
    >> I'll send you a copy.
    >>
    >>>And another thing...over the years of listening to friends with laptops,
    >>>it
    >>>seems that the adapter cord, where it plugs into the computer, tends to
    >>>break. Is it due to the curve in the cord and pull that might be on it or
    >>>people pulling the cord out wrong? Would wrapping with electrical tape or
    >>>using a popcicle stick as a brace and then wrapping it about 5" down the
    >>>cord help?

    >>
    >> Yes that would help. Wnen a plug fails, you can also cut off the
    >> old plug** and attach a new one. It's very easy, and plugs are
    >> available at hardware stores and their recent imitators.
    >>
    >> Do you or someone you know have a voltmeter, a voltohmeter, or a
    >> mulitmeter. Usually they are the same thing. You can measure
    >> electrical continuity from each prong of the plug to each of the
    >> copper holes at the other end, the end that goes into the brick.
    >> Unplug the cord from the wall first, of course and the resistance for
    >> each wire should be zero or just about. If neither is like that,
    >> you're doing something wrong, but if one is like that and the other is
    >> very high, or a digital meter shows a 1, then that wire is broken.
    >>
    >> If you're not sure, cut the plug off and leave a couple inches of wire
    >> on it, so you can reuse the plug later if it turns out to be good.
    >>
    >> Where you cut, separate the two wire from each other going back about
    >> 1" (that's an inch, not celsius) strip the rubber off of 1/2", leaving
    >> the copper underneath, and attach the plug by tightening the screws.
    >> Some plugs go on without stripping the wires, but I think the cords
    >> from computers are usually too thick to fit in to their holes.
    >>
    >>>Monica
    >>>

    >>
     
    mm, Jan 8, 2011
    #7
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