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Koolance blue liquid?

Discussion in 'AMD Overclocking' started by mark, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. mark

    mark Guest

    What is this liquid, can I just use something else like water to top of?
    mark, Nov 9, 2006
    #1
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  2. mark

    Paul Guest

    mark wrote:
    > What is this liquid, can I just use something else like water to top of?
    >
    >


    The MSDS (material safety) file is here. Unzip to find a PDF:

    http://www.koolance.com/support/files/msds_liq600-700bu.zip

    The 3% by weight which is unidentified, is likely the blue color
    added to the fluid.

    Paul
    Paul, Nov 9, 2006
    #2
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  3. mark

    mark Guest

    so can I use the green car coolent?
    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:eiupt2$2u4$...
    > mark wrote:
    >> What is this liquid, can I just use something else like water to top of?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > The MSDS (material safety) file is here. Unzip to find a PDF:
    >
    > http://www.koolance.com/support/files/msds_liq600-700bu.zip
    >
    > The 3% by weight which is unidentified, is likely the blue color
    > added to the fluid.
    >
    > Paul
    mark, Nov 9, 2006
    #3
  4. mark

    Paul Guest

    mark wrote:
    > so can I use the green car coolent?
    > "Paul" <> wrote in message
    > news:eiupt2$2u4$...
    >> mark wrote:
    >>> What is this liquid, can I just use something else like water to top of?
    >>>
    >>>

    >> The MSDS (material safety) file is here. Unzip to find a PDF:
    >>
    >> http://www.koolance.com/support/files/msds_liq600-700bu.zip
    >>
    >> The 3% by weight which is unidentified, is likely the blue color
    >> added to the fluid.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    >


    If some of the water evaporated, you could top it up with distilled
    water (my hardware store carries jugs of distilled water, for mixing up with
    car antifreeze). Distilled water is good, because it doesn't have a
    mineral content like some tap water. Meaning less stuff that can corrode
    any parts that are susceptible to corrosion.

    If you spilled the coolant (meaning equal quantities of water
    and ethylene glycol escaped), then logically you'd want to
    replace both of them. I guess the question I would be asking,
    is what property of ethylene glycol is indispensible to
    computer cooling ? In a car, ethylene glycol raises the
    boiling point of the coolant, which means lower operating
    pressure in the cooling system for a given temperature. But
    you would hope the computer is not about to boil the coolant,
    or cause the plumbing to be pressurized. So I don't see what
    advantage the 30% ethylene glycol is having. Maybe it kills
    bacteria or something ? I don't really know. I suppose
    by lowering the partial pressure of water vapor, it could
    be reducing the rate of evaporation.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethylene_Glycol

    Paul
    Paul, Nov 10, 2006
    #4
  5. mark

    Bill Guest

    In article <ej0o2t$dv8$>,
    says...
    >

    <nsip>
    >
    > If you spilled the coolant (meaning equal quantities of water
    > and ethylene glycol escaped), then logically you'd want to
    > replace both of them. I guess the question I would be asking,
    > is what property of ethylene glycol is indispensible to
    > computer cooling ? In a car, ethylene glycol raises the
    > boiling point of the coolant, which means lower operating
    > pressure in the cooling system for a given temperature.

    <snip>

    A secondary property of ethylene glycol in an automobile cooling
    system is to lubricate the water pump.

    >
    > Paul
    >


    Bill
    --
    Gmail and Google Groups. This century's answer to AOL and WebTV.
    Bill, Nov 10, 2006
    #5
  6. mark

    jt3 Guest

    Also to reduce corrosion, esp. if Al is present, but Fe also. As Paul
    suggests, it does indeed lower the vapor pressure of the mix, causing less
    evaporation.

    Joe
    "Bill" <> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1fbd8965c3c93e8f98972b@localhost...
    > In article <ej0o2t$dv8$>,
    > says...
    > >

    > <nsip>
    > >
    > > If you spilled the coolant (meaning equal quantities of water
    > > and ethylene glycol escaped), then logically you'd want to
    > > replace both of them. I guess the question I would be asking,
    > > is what property of ethylene glycol is indispensible to
    > > computer cooling ? In a car, ethylene glycol raises the
    > > boiling point of the coolant, which means lower operating
    > > pressure in the cooling system for a given temperature.

    > <snip>
    >
    > A secondary property of ethylene glycol in an automobile cooling
    > system is to lubricate the water pump.
    >
    > >
    > > Paul
    > >

    >
    > Bill
    > --
    > Gmail and Google Groups. This century's answer to AOL and WebTV.
    jt3, Nov 11, 2006
    #6
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