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Looking for system stress / burn-in software

Discussion in 'Intel' started by PC Guy, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. PC Guy

    PC Guy Guest

    I've got a few motherboards that I need to determine their operational
    reliability / stability while running XP, so I'm wondering if there is
    any free software that can do stress testing or "burn-in" operations for
    one or two weeks continuously running under XP. Basically, any software
    that can keep a system busy doing stuff until (or if) the system crashes
    or locks up. Serial, parallel, network, audio and USB stress testing is
    not required.

    Anyone know of any such software?
    PC Guy, Sep 19, 2010
    #1
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  2. PC Guy

    John McGaw Guest

    On 9/18/2010 10:31 PM, PC Guy wrote:
    > I've got a few motherboards that I need to determine their operational
    > reliability / stability while running XP, so I'm wondering if there is
    > any free software that can do stress testing or "burn-in" operations for
    > one or two weeks continuously running under XP. Basically, any software
    > that can keep a system busy doing stuff until (or if) the system crashes
    > or locks up. Serial, parallel, network, audio and USB stress testing is
    > not required.
    >
    > Anyone know of any such software?


    Any software which runs the CPU(s) at 100% and uses a lot of memory
    bandwidth will do what you describe and there are many ways to do it. One
    of the simplest, and thus the most popular, programs that fills the bill is
    Prime95. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prime95
    John McGaw, Sep 19, 2010
    #2
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  3. > I've got a few motherboards that I need to determine their operational
    > reliability / stability while running XP, so I'm wondering if there is
    > any free software that can do stress testing or "burn-in" operations for
    > one or two weeks continuously running under XP. Basically, any software
    > that can keep a system busy doing stuff until (or if) the system crashes
    > or locks up. Serial, parallel, network, audio and USB stress testing is
    > not required.


    RAM: memtest86
    GPU (graphics): 3dMark 2006 or even PCMark Vantage
    CPU: I forgot... Everest? SuperPi?

    --
    @~@ Might, Courage, Vision, SINCERITY.
    / v \ Simplicity is Beauty! May the Force and Farce be with you!
    /( _ )\ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.35.4
    ^ ^ 22:43:01 up 23 days 50 min 1 user load average: 1.08 1.14 1.15
    ä¸å€Ÿè²¸! ä¸è©é¨™! ä¸æ´äº¤! ä¸æ‰“交! ä¸æ‰“劫! ä¸è‡ªæ®º! è«‹è€ƒæ…®ç¶œæ´ (CSSA):
    http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
    Man-wai Chang, Sep 19, 2010
    #3
  4. PC Guy

    PC Guy Guest

    John McGaw wrote:

    > > I've got a few motherboards that I need to determine their
    > > operational reliability / stability while running XP,

    >
    > Any software which runs the CPU(s) at 100% and uses a lot of memory
    > bandwidth will do what you describe and there are many ways to do
    > it.


    I'm looking for software that will basically do something to simulate
    the workload that an average human being might perform on a PC. I'm not
    really looking to max out the CPU just to test the heatsink of the CPU
    or something like that.

    I can turn on these PC's and just let them sit there with no app running
    for a solid week, but I'd like the PC to be doing something more than
    that during that period.

    Prime 95 won't (as far as I know) do any hard drive reading / writing,
    or do anything graphics related. If I'm not mistaken, it's actually
    booted from a floppy and doesn't even run as a Windows GUI program.
    PC Guy, Sep 19, 2010
    #4
  5. PC Guy

    PC Guy Guest

    Man-wai Chang wrote:

    > > I've got a few motherboards that I need to determine their
    > > operational reliability / stability while running XP, so I'm
    > > wondering if there is any free software that can do stress
    > > testing or "burn-in" operations for one or two weeks continuously
    > > running under XP.

    >
    > RAM: memtest86
    > GPU (graphics): 3dMark 2006 or even PCMark Vantage
    > CPU: I forgot... Everest? SuperPi?


    I want something that I can start and then walk away for several days,
    maybe even a week or two, and will keep running until I stop it or the
    PC locks up or crashes.

    And I want one app, not 2 or 3 that I don't even know can run
    concurrently under XP.

    What about Sandra? Anyone know anything about that?
    PC Guy, Sep 19, 2010
    #5
  6. > I want something that I can start and then walk away for several days,
    > maybe even a week or two, and will keep running until I stop it or the
    > PC locks up or crashes.
    > And I want one app, not 2 or 3 that I don't even know can run
    > concurrently under XP.
    >
    > What about Sandra? Anyone know anything about that?


    Try it then. But I would choose 3dMark even when your graphic card is
    not a good one. Just select & run the tests your configuration can handle.

    --
    @~@ Might, Courage, Vision, SINCERITY.
    / v \ Simplicity is Beauty! May the Force and Farce be with you!
    /( _ )\ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.35.4
    ^ ^ 00:03:01 up 23 days 2:10 1 user load average: 1.06 1.08 1.08
    ä¸å€Ÿè²¸! ä¸è©é¨™! ä¸æ´äº¤! ä¸æ‰“交! ä¸æ‰“劫! ä¸è‡ªæ®º! è«‹è€ƒæ…®ç¶œæ´ (CSSA):
    http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
    Man-wai Chang, Sep 19, 2010
    #6
  7. PC Guy

    John McGaw Guest

    On 9/19/2010 11:49 AM, PC Guy wrote:
    > John McGaw wrote:
    >
    >>> I've got a few motherboards that I need to determine their
    >>> operational reliability / stability while running XP,

    >>
    >> Any software which runs the CPU(s) at 100% and uses a lot of memory
    >> bandwidth will do what you describe and there are many ways to do
    >> it.

    >
    > I'm looking for software that will basically do something to simulate
    > the workload that an average human being might perform on a PC. I'm not
    > really looking to max out the CPU just to test the heatsink of the CPU
    > or something like that.
    >
    > I can turn on these PC's and just let them sit there with no app running
    > for a solid week, but I'd like the PC to be doing something more than
    > that during that period.
    >
    > Prime 95 won't (as far as I know) do any hard drive reading / writing,
    > or do anything graphics related. If I'm not mistaken, it's actually
    > booted from a floppy and doesn't even run as a Windows GUI program.


    OK, if that doesn't fit your needs then you could install the BOINC client
    and pick some project to participate in. Set the client to use whatever
    portion of the CPU capacity, memory, disk etc that you think will emulate a
    "normal" use of the computer and let the client run for a couple of weeks.
    Pick a project which features a graphics screen saver which illustrates its
    progress and the graphics subsystem will be exercised also.

    If you want to stress the disk operations you can add on a batch file which
    copies files back and forth, zips them, unzips them, compares them,
    calculates MD5 codes or whatever your heart desires. Add sleep intervals as
    appropriate or let the drive(s) grind at full speed as seems appropriate.
    John McGaw, Sep 19, 2010
    #7
  8. PC Guy

    andy Guest

    On Sat, 18 Sep 2010 22:31:26 -0400, PC Guy <> wrote:

    >I've got a few motherboards that I need to determine their operational
    >reliability / stability while running XP, so I'm wondering if there is
    >any free software that can do stress testing or "burn-in" operations for
    >one or two weeks continuously running under XP. Basically, any software
    >that can keep a system busy doing stuff until (or if) the system crashes
    >or locks up. Serial, parallel, network, audio and USB stress testing is
    >not required.
    >
    >Anyone know of any such software?


    Intel Burn Test.
    andy, Sep 19, 2010
    #8
  9. PC Guy

    ShadowTek Guest

    On 2010-09-19, John McGaw <> wrote:
    >
    > If you want to stress the disk operations you can add on a batch file which
    > copies files back and forth, zips them, unzips them, compares them,
    > calculates MD5 codes or whatever your heart desires. Add sleep intervals as
    > appropriate or let the drive(s) grind at full speed as seems appropriate.


    Simply using badblocks sounds a lot less complicated then all of
    that.
    ShadowTek, Sep 19, 2010
    #9
  10. PC Guy

    John McGaw Guest

    On 9/19/2010 6:39 PM, ShadowTek wrote:
    > On 2010-09-19, John McGaw<> wrote:
    >>
    >> If you want to stress the disk operations you can add on a batch file which
    >> copies files back and forth, zips them, unzips them, compares them,
    >> calculates MD5 codes or whatever your heart desires. Add sleep intervals as
    >> appropriate or let the drive(s) grind at full speed as seems appropriate.

    >
    > Simply using badblocks sounds a lot less complicated then all of
    > that.


    It depends on what you want to test. Since badblocks is a Linux program and
    does a one-time scan of the drive it is hard to see how it is going to
    simulate a realistic system load for a week or more under Windows. As for
    complicated, writing a BAT file to do some disk activity on a continuing
    basis and exercise a system's drive(s) for a long period is pretty simple
    and non-threatening.
    John McGaw, Sep 19, 2010
    #10
  11. "PC Guy" <> wrote in message news:...
    > I've got a few motherboards that I need to determine their operational
    > reliability / stability while running XP, so I'm wondering if there is
    > any free software that can do stress testing or "burn-in" operations for
    > one or two weeks continuously running under XP. Basically, any software
    > that can keep a system busy doing stuff until (or if) the system crashes
    > or locks up. Serial, parallel, network, audio and USB stress testing is
    > not required.


    This is a bit strange.

    So you wanna test a motherboard, but you don't wanna test mouses, printers,
    networking/internet,
    soundblasters/audio chips.

    Then later on you describe an "average human being".

    An average human being uses all of these things which you think are not
    required for testing.

    To me it seems you testing idea/method is already flawed from the start.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    Skybuck Flying, Sep 20, 2010
    #11
  12. PC Guy

    PC Guy Guest

    Skybuck Flying wrote:

    > So you wanna test a motherboard, but you don't wanna test mouses,
    > printers, networking/internet, soundblasters/audio chips.
    > Then later on you describe an "average human being".
    >
    > An average human being uses all of these things which you think are
    > not required for testing. To me it seems you testing idea/method
    > is already flawed from the start.


    I'll give you some background:

    Our company has shipped a number of data acquisition computers based on
    the Soyo SY-P4I 845PE ISA (SY-845PEISA) and SY-P4I-845GVISA Plus
    motherboards over the past 5 to 6 years.

    http://www2.dealtime.com/xPF-Soyo-SOYO-P4845PEISA-DDR333-A-L

    The first of these boards that we used was the PE-ISA, which does not
    have on-board video but it does have an AGP slot. Starting about 3 years
    ago we started shipping systems based on the GV-ISA-Plus. These boards
    seem identical except that the GV has on-board video (Intel Extreme
    graphics or something like that - 8mb video ram) and no AGP slot.

    I'm sure that all of these boards (both types) were originally
    manufactured between 2003 and late 2005.

    Over the past year, we've had some of the GV boards fail in the field,
    exhibiting strange problems (some don't boot at all, some will partially
    boot XP and then just freeze, some will boot XP and run fine for 6 to 12
    hours and then either spontaneously re-boot or just freeze/lock-up).
    It's likely that very few of these systems have printers attached to
    them, and probably half of them are not connected to a network.

    The problem does not seem to happen with the older PE motherboards (the
    boards that don't have on-board video but do have an AGP slot). We have
    some of these PE boards being used heavily in-house for the past 5 years
    and they work great - no problems ever.

    The systems that have failed have been working for at least 1 to 2
    years, but the frequency of use of any given system is unknown. They all
    have socket 478 Intel Celeron CPU's, 2.6 ghz speed, stock Intel CPU
    cooler/fan, and either 512 mb or 1gb ram, 80 gb WD hard drive.

    We don't have that many of these boards left for use in new systems, and
    some of those that we do have seemed to have problems on the
    construction bench in the past and were not used for one reason or
    another.

    I'm aware of a massive problem with capacitors that really affected Dell
    around the same time that these boards would have been made, and we are
    experimentally taking a few boards and changing the electrolytic
    capacitors (1000 and 1500 uf) with new ones to see if that solves their
    problems with operational stability.

    Hence the reason for my original question, which was to seek software
    that simulates medium to heavy single-user load on systems running XP.
    We have to insure that these replacement systems can run for at least a
    week solid with no hint of trouble before we ship them back out.

    I am aware that Soyo went bankrupt or went out of business around May
    2009, and I've seen some comments that they stopped making motherboards
    about 3 years before that.
    PC Guy, Sep 21, 2010
    #12
  13. PC Guy

    JW Guest

    On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 22:48:04 -0400 PC Guy <> wrote in Message
    id: <>:

    >I'm aware of a massive problem with capacitors that really affected Dell
    >around the same time that these boards would have been made, and we are
    >experimentally taking a few boards and changing the electrolytic
    >capacitors (1000 and 1500 uf) with new ones to see if that solves their
    >problems with operational stability.


    I'll bet that fixes your problem. Not just Dell was affected, and
    electrolytic caps only have a lifetime of 2000 hours or so anyway. Make
    sure you get low ESR types for replacement. If the problem persists, try a
    new power supply as well.

    You could try this diagnostic, there's a 30 day evaluation:
    http://www.passmark.com/products/bit.htm
    If it does what you need it's pretty reasonable price-wise.
    JW, Sep 21, 2010
    #13
  14. PC Guy

    Andrew Guest

    On 21 Sep, 10:30, JW <> wrote:

    > I'll bet that fixes your problem. Not just Dell was affected, and
    > electrolytic caps only have a lifetime of 2000 hours or so anyway. Make
    > sure you get low ESR types for replacement. If the problem persists, try a
    > new power supply as well.


    That life span sounds like it is straight from a device data sheet
    without considering what that data sheet actually says: it is easy to
    come up with misleading conclusions as a consequence. 2000 hours is
    less than a quarter, and even the majority of cheap tat on sale today
    lasts longer than that. The quoted lifespan is usually quoted at the
    device's maximum temperature which is going to be 85C even for the
    lowest grade caps. For every 10C under the limit capacitor life
    slightly more than doubles. Reduce the temeperature down to a typical
    working temeprature - say 30C - and that 2000 hour capacitor can be
    expected to last a decade of 24/7 operation. The more common 105C
    caps would be good for 40 years. Soundly made electrolytics last a
    long time in conservative operating conditions.

    --
    Andrew Smallshaw
    Andrew, Sep 24, 2010
    #14
  15. On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 21:36:50 +0200, "Skybuck Flying"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"PC Guy" <> wrote in message news:...
    >> I've got a few motherboards that I need to determine their operational
    >> reliability / stability while running XP, so I'm wondering if there is
    >> any free software that can do stress testing or "burn-in" operations for
    >> one or two weeks continuously running under XP. Basically, any software
    >> that can keep a system busy doing stuff until (or if) the system crashes
    >> or locks up. Serial, parallel, network, audio and USB stress testing is
    >> not required.

    >
    >This is a bit strange.
    >
    >So you wanna test a motherboard, but you don't wanna test mouses, printers,
    >networking/internet,
    >soundblasters/audio chips.
    >
    >Then later on you describe an "average human being".
    >
    >An average human being uses all of these things which you think are not
    >required for testing.
    >
    >To me it seems you testing idea/method is already flawed from the start.
    >
    >Bye,
    > Skybuck.


    Coming from a world class nitwit like you, I find your comments friggin'
    hilarious.
    personaobscura, Sep 26, 2010
    #15
  16. PC Guy

    Lee Waun Guest

    "John McGaw" <> wrote in message
    news:KXolo.206528$1.easynews.com...
    > On 9/18/2010 10:31 PM, PC Guy wrote:
    >> I've got a few motherboards that I need to determine their operational
    >> reliability / stability while running XP, so I'm wondering if there is
    >> any free software that can do stress testing or "burn-in" operations for
    >> one or two weeks continuously running under XP. Basically, any software
    >> that can keep a system busy doing stuff until (or if) the system crashes
    >> or locks up. Serial, parallel, network, audio and USB stress testing is
    >> not required.
    >>
    >> Anyone know of any such software?

    >
    > Any software which runs the CPU(s) at 100% and uses a lot of memory
    > bandwidth will do what you describe and there are many ways to do it. One
    > of the simplest, and thus the most popular, programs that fills the bill
    > is Prime95. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prime95
    >
    >


    Interesting.
    Lee Waun, Oct 21, 2010
    #16
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