1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

Low budget E4300 build

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by Fishface, Jul 8, 2007.

  1. Fishface

    Fishface Guest

    So I'm helping a guy at work build a new computer. Ok, I'm doing it, and he's
    watching!

    New Parts:

    $114.50 E4300 from ZipZoomFly
    $ 90.00 XP Home from ZZF
    $ 62.40 2GB SuperTalent PC2-6400 from eWiz
    $ 60.00 Antec NSK-6500 case from Fry's
    $ 6.00 92mm Zalman fan with quiet mode adapter purchased locally

    Used parts:

    $ 74.00 Biostar 965pt from eBay
    $ 15.00 ATech Internal flash card reader
    $ 8.00 USR internal 56k modem


    Reused Parts:

    Samsung DVD Burner
    Maxtor 200GB HDD
    Keyboard, Mouse, Speakers, Monitor (for now)

    No video card yet, that's next paycheck. I used my 7600GS to set it up.
    There's about $430 cash out of his pocket, so far, less whatever he can get for
    an 1GHz Celeron eMachines computer with XP factory installed.

    I tested the motherboard with my E6400. When it ran Orthos at 420 x 7 overnight
    I was done testing. I tested the memory in my computer. When it ran memtest at
    DDR2-820 speed at 4-4-4-12 timings overnight, I was done testing.

    I put the thing together without testing the CPU IHS and retail HSF for flatness.
    I didn't pull the northbridge and reapply thermal paste. It wouldn't run much above
    stock speed. The BIOS needed to be updated to properly recognize the E4300
    and get the 400MHz memory setting that was the synchronous setting. Memtest
    didn't like anything over about 2.85 GHz. Orthos didn't like much over 2.7 GHz
    without errors or overheating. Still, that's a 50% overclock, nothing to sneeze at.
    Default vCore is 1.325 volts. Raising the voltage didn't help stability, so I lowered
    it to 1.275 volts and left it.

    He's going to get a 19" 1280x1024 LCD monitor for under $200. I'd like to sell
    him my LG 22", which would be good for gaming, but is perhaps not so good for
    photo editing, and of course requires more GPU power to drive. He likes to play
    games, and I'm trying to get him to spring for an 8800GTS, but he really wants to
    get an 8600GTS. For the money, I might try to steer him into an X1950XT instead.
     
    Fishface, Jul 8, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Fishface

    Phil Guest

    Fishface wrote:
    > So I'm helping a guy at work build a new computer. Ok, I'm doing it,
    > and he's watching!
    >
    > New Parts:
    >
    > $114.50 E4300 from ZipZoomFly
    > $ 90.00 XP Home from ZZF
    > $ 62.40 2GB SuperTalent PC2-6400 from eWiz
    > $ 60.00 Antec NSK-6500 case from Fry's
    > $ 6.00 92mm Zalman fan with quiet mode adapter purchased
    > locally
    >
    > Used parts:
    >
    > $ 74.00 Biostar 965pt from eBay
    > $ 15.00 ATech Internal flash card reader
    > $ 8.00 USR internal 56k modem
    >
    >
    > Reused Parts:
    >
    > Samsung DVD Burner
    > Maxtor 200GB HDD
    > Keyboard, Mouse, Speakers, Monitor (for now)
    >
    > No video card yet, that's next paycheck. I used my 7600GS to set it
    > up.
    > There's about $430 cash out of his pocket, so far, less whatever he
    > can get for
    > an 1GHz Celeron eMachines computer with XP factory installed.
    >
    > I tested the motherboard with my E6400. When it ran Orthos at 420 x
    > 7 overnight
    > I was done testing. I tested the memory in my computer. When it ran
    > memtest at DDR2-820 speed at 4-4-4-12 timings overnight, I was done
    > testing.
    >
    > I put the thing together without testing the CPU IHS and retail HSF
    > for flatness.
    > I didn't pull the northbridge and reapply thermal paste. It wouldn't
    > run much above stock speed. The BIOS needed to be updated to
    > properly recognize the E4300
    > and get the 400MHz memory setting that was the synchronous setting.
    > Memtest
    > didn't like anything over about 2.85 GHz. Orthos didn't like much
    > over 2.7 GHz without errors or overheating. Still, that's a 50%
    > overclock, nothing to sneeze at. Default vCore is 1.325 volts.
    > Raising the voltage didn't help stability, so I lowered it to 1.275
    > volts and left it.
    >
    > He's going to get a 19" 1280x1024 LCD monitor for under $200. I'd
    > like to sell
    > him my LG 22", which would be good for gaming, but is perhaps not so
    > good for
    > photo editing, and of course requires more GPU power to drive. He
    > likes to play games, and I'm trying to get him to spring for an
    > 8800GTS, but he really wants to
    > get an 8600GTS. For the money, I might try to steer him into an
    > X1950XT instead.


    I have absolutely had it with used computer parts off eBay. I don't care if
    I saved $X, but I have been burned too many times with broken stuff. Either
    people don't know their underperforming stuff was broken in the first place
    so they offloaded it, or they knew and were just trying to get rid of it
    shadily, asking for negative feedback in return ;)

    Newegg, ZZF, buy.com, fatwallet for me only now.

    --
    Phil
     
    Phil, Jul 8, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Fishface

    Fishface Guest

    Phil wrote:
    > I have absolutely had it with used computer parts off eBay. I don't care
    > if I saved $X, but I have been burned too many times with broken stuff.
    > Either people don't know their underperforming stuff was broken in the
    > first place so they offloaded it, or they knew and were just trying to get
    > rid of it shadily, asking for negative feedback in return ;)


    Yeah, it is always a bit risky. The seller was a private party who posted on
    the xtremesystems.org forums. He was selling all his parts and I decided
    to trust him. I guess we were lucky that time. In the past, I have gotten two
    bad video cards that were almost free, a BX motherboard with a funky I/O
    chip (running fine for several years with a HSF and Parallel port card that
    was in my junk box), and some PC-133 memory that only ran at 120 MHz
    (but I only bought it for use at 100 MHz).

    I think a used motherboard is probably especially risky, what with all the
    plugging and unplugging, surface mounted parts, heating and cooling cycles,
    and static sensitivity.

    It's funny, Newegg has an "open box" 965pt for sale now for $52 plus shipping.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813138037R

    I wonder if it was the one returned by someone named Vector- who wrote:

    Worked well... for awhile

    Pros: Solid audio, good chips, was stable for awhile....

    Cons: After roughly 6 months, my computer decided to immediately shut off,
    and now the board refuses to POST. Wasn't overclocked, everything set
    to specifications (which were rather difficult to find, I might add)...

    Other Thoughts: Hopefully will be able to RMA it... doubt I'll buy another Biostar
    in the foreseeable future however.
     
    Fishface, Jul 8, 2007
    #3
  4. Fishface

    Phil Guest

    "Fishface" <?> wrote in message
    news:zI8ki.574$mS3.138@trnddc03...
    > Phil wrote:
    >> I have absolutely had it with used computer parts off eBay. I don't care
    >> if I saved $X, but I have been burned too many times with broken stuff.
    >> Either people don't know their underperforming stuff was broken in the
    >> first place so they offloaded it, or they knew and were just trying to
    >> get
    >> rid of it shadily, asking for negative feedback in return ;)

    >
    > Yeah, it is always a bit risky. The seller was a private party who posted
    > on
    > the xtremesystems.org forums. He was selling all his parts and I decided
    > to trust him. I guess we were lucky that time. In the past, I have
    > gotten two
    > bad video cards that were almost free, a BX motherboard with a funky I/O
    > chip (running fine for several years with a HSF and Parallel port card
    > that
    > was in my junk box), and some PC-133 memory that only ran at 120 MHz
    > (but I only bought it for use at 100 MHz).


    It's free if you spend 0 minutes messing around with it. I've determined
    that my time is worth far more than I've spent trying to troubleshoot used
    equipment, especially OC'able equipment.

    > I think a used motherboard is probably especially risky, what with all the
    > plugging and unplugging, surface mounted parts, heating and cooling
    > cycles,
    > and static sensitivity.


    Excellent point, especially about the static sensitivity. After taking an
    ESD class at my new employer, I realize now how many things can be
    mishandled, and something can be packed with latent failures waiting to
    happen. I think it was something like 200V static discharge can cause
    problems. We can feel 6000V and up I think. New stuff for me from now on.

    > It's funny, Newegg has an "open box" 965pt for sale now for $52 plus
    > shipping.
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813138037R
    >
    > I wonder if it was the one returned by someone named Vector- who wrote:
    >
    > Worked well... for awhile
    >
    > Pros: Solid audio, good chips, was stable for awhile....
    >
    > Cons: After roughly 6 months, my computer decided to immediately shut off,
    > and now the board refuses to POST. Wasn't overclocked,
    > everything set
    > to specifications (which were rather difficult to find, I might
    > add)...
    >
    > Other Thoughts: Hopefully will be able to RMA it... doubt I'll buy another
    > Biostar
    > in the foreseeable future however.


    Yeah those reports turned me away, too. It's a crapshoot, and even a 5%
    likelihood of getting a dud will turn me away if those statistics were
    available.

    --
    Phil
     
    Phil, Jul 8, 2007
    #4
  5. Fishface

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Fishface' wrote, in part:
    | Excellent point, especially about the static sensitivity. After taking an
    | ESD class at my new employer, I realize now how many things can be
    | mishandled, and something can be packed with latent failures waiting to
    | happen. I think it was something like 200V static discharge can cause
    | problems. We can feel 6000V and up I think. New stuff for me from now
    on.
    _____

    I've found the key to handling static charge is humidity. For quite some
    time I lived in South Florida. The only precaution needed was to turn off
    the air conditioning! Get the humidity up around 60% or so you just don't
    generate enough static charge to matter B^) Winter in Northern climes is an
    entirely different matter, with indoor humidity as low as 10% - and
    consequently BIG static charge problems. When the humidity gets that low
    all the other precautions in the world aren't satisfactory.

    Phil Weldon

    "Phil" <> wrote in message
    news:46915831$0$4665$...
    |
    |
    | "Fishface" <?> wrote in message
    | news:zI8ki.574$mS3.138@trnddc03...
    | > Phil wrote:
    | >> I have absolutely had it with used computer parts off eBay. I don't
    care
    | >> if I saved $X, but I have been burned too many times with broken stuff.
    | >> Either people don't know their underperforming stuff was broken in the
    | >> first place so they offloaded it, or they knew and were just trying to
    | >> get
    | >> rid of it shadily, asking for negative feedback in return ;)
    | >
    | > Yeah, it is always a bit risky. The seller was a private party who
    posted
    | > on
    | > the xtremesystems.org forums. He was selling all his parts and I
    decided
    | > to trust him. I guess we were lucky that time. In the past, I have
    | > gotten two
    | > bad video cards that were almost free, a BX motherboard with a funky I/O
    | > chip (running fine for several years with a HSF and Parallel port card
    | > that
    | > was in my junk box), and some PC-133 memory that only ran at 120 MHz
    | > (but I only bought it for use at 100 MHz).
    |
    | It's free if you spend 0 minutes messing around with it. I've determined
    | that my time is worth far more than I've spent trying to troubleshoot used
    | equipment, especially OC'able equipment.
    |
    | > I think a used motherboard is probably especially risky, what with all
    the
    | > plugging and unplugging, surface mounted parts, heating and cooling
    | > cycles,
    | > and static sensitivity.
    |
    | Excellent point, especially about the static sensitivity. After taking an
    | ESD class at my new employer, I realize now how many things can be
    | mishandled, and something can be packed with latent failures waiting to
    | happen. I think it was something like 200V static discharge can cause
    | problems. We can feel 6000V and up I think. New stuff for me from now
    on.
    |
    | > It's funny, Newegg has an "open box" 965pt for sale now for $52 plus
    | > shipping.
    | > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813138037R
    | >
    | > I wonder if it was the one returned by someone named Vector- who wrote:
    | >
    | > Worked well... for awhile
    | >
    | > Pros: Solid audio, good chips, was stable for awhile....
    | >
    | > Cons: After roughly 6 months, my computer decided to immediately shut
    off,
    | > and now the board refuses to POST. Wasn't overclocked,
    | > everything set
    | > to specifications (which were rather difficult to find, I
    might
    | > add)...
    | >
    | > Other Thoughts: Hopefully will be able to RMA it... doubt I'll buy
    another
    | > Biostar
    | > in the foreseeable future however.
    |
    | Yeah those reports turned me away, too. It's a crapshoot, and even a 5%
    | likelihood of getting a dud will turn me away if those statistics were
    | available.
    |
    | --
    | Phil
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Jul 8, 2007
    #5
  6. Fishface

    Fishface Guest

    Phil Weldon wrote:
    > I've found the key to handling static charge is humidity. For quite some
    > time I lived in South Florida. The only precaution needed was to turn off
    > the air conditioning! Get the humidity up around 60% or so you just don't
    > generate enough static charge to matter B^) Winter in Northern climes
    > is an entirely different matter, with indoor humidity as low as 10% - and
    > consequently BIG static charge problems. When the humidity gets that
    > low all the other precautions in the world aren't satisfactory.


    I remember how muggy it was every time I visited Florida, and how the sky
    opened-up most afternoons. It rained so hard that all the cars all pulled over!

    Here in the Porland area of Oregon, you'd be hard pressed to create a
    spark in the winter (rainy season). The Oregon Museum of Science has
    trouble getting the huge Van De Graaf ultrastatic generator to produce even
    a small spark. Summer is a different matter, as there is very low humidity.
    In the summer, I get shocked every time I get out of the car and I can see a
    spark when I touch my key to the mailbox at night!

    We assembled in a damp, cool basement with the power supply plugged-in
    but switched-off, grounding ourselves frequently. This has always worked
    well for me. Other times, I will put a kettle on the boil, turn on the humidifier,
    or even make soup! I do have an anti-static wrist strap from Radio Shack,
    but seldom actually use it, as it is very short. Before plugging-in cables, I
    always touch the metal connector and the grounded case, something I
    started doing after hearing about fried ICH5 southbridges, which I have on
    an Asus P4P800 SE.

    I do always take extreme precautions when testing new parts, to be certain
    that I do no electrostatic harm.
     
    Fishface, Jul 9, 2007
    #6
  7. Fishface

    Fishface Guest

    Fishface wrote:

    > It rained so hard that all the cars all pulled over!


    Yeah, all of 'em. I've got to get a new proof-reader...
     
    Fishface, Jul 9, 2007
    #7
  8. Fishface

    John Caceres Guest

    >> Phil wrote:

    > Excellent point, especially about the static sensitivity. After taking an
    > ESD class at my new employer, I realize now how many things can be
    > mishandled, and something can be packed with latent failures waiting to
    > happen. I think it was something like 200V static discharge can cause
    > problems. We can feel 6000V and up I think. New stuff for me from now
    > on.
    >


    And if it "hurts" when you get zapped it's over 20k volts.

    JC
     
    John Caceres, Jul 9, 2007
    #8
  9. Fishface

    Phil Guest

    John Caceres wrote:
    >>> Phil wrote:

    >
    >> Excellent point, especially about the static sensitivity. After
    >> taking an ESD class at my new employer, I realize now how many
    >> things can be mishandled, and something can be packed with latent
    >> failures waiting to happen. I think it was something like 200V
    >> static discharge can cause problems. We can feel 6000V and up I
    >> think. New stuff for me from now on.
    >>

    >
    > And if it "hurts" when you get zapped it's over 20k volts.
    >
    > JC


    Just today at work, I was pulling off the top layer of a 4'x4' sticky mat at
    work where dirt from outside gets stickied off the bottom of shoes at the
    entrance to a clean room. I pulled off the layer very quickly, turned to a
    trash can sitting next to a metal locker, and BAM my arm jerked suddenly as
    a huge spark hit my arm that grazed the locker. It was way worse than a
    pull-off-a-sweater or shuffle-across-the-floor spark. Probably the worst
    I've ever experienced.

    I could only imagine what would have happened if I was holding a processor
    or some other electrical component. At least my area is a mechanical, not
    electrical area.

    --
    Phil
     
    Phil, Jul 10, 2007
    #9
  10. Fishface

    Ed Medlin Guest

    "Phil" <> wrote in message
    news:4692e949$0$24730$...
    > John Caceres wrote:
    >>>> Phil wrote:

    >>
    >>> Excellent point, especially about the static sensitivity. After
    >>> taking an ESD class at my new employer, I realize now how many
    >>> things can be mishandled, and something can be packed with latent
    >>> failures waiting to happen. I think it was something like 200V
    >>> static discharge can cause problems. We can feel 6000V and up I
    >>> think. New stuff for me from now on.
    >>>

    >>
    >> And if it "hurts" when you get zapped it's over 20k volts.
    >>
    >> JC

    >
    > Just today at work, I was pulling off the top layer of a 4'x4' sticky
    > mat at work where dirt from outside gets stickied off the bottom of
    > shoes at the entrance to a clean room. I pulled off the layer very
    > quickly, turned to a trash can sitting next to a metal locker, and BAM
    > my arm jerked suddenly as a huge spark hit my arm that grazed the
    > locker. It was way worse than a pull-off-a-sweater or
    > shuffle-across-the-floor spark. Probably the worst I've ever
    > experienced.
    >
    > I could only imagine what would have happened if I was holding a
    > processor or some other electrical component. At least my area is a
    > mechanical, not electrical area.
    >
    > --
    > Phil

    Before I retired we used the non-static 'booties' in electrical
    areas, but I have seen those mats more and more even in electronic clean
    rooms. I had no idea that they could hold that kind of a charge.


    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Jul 10, 2007
    #10
  11. Fishface

    Phil Guest

    Ed Medlin wrote:
    > "Phil" <> wrote in message
    > news:4692e949$0$24730$...
    >> John Caceres wrote:
    >>>>> Phil wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Excellent point, especially about the static sensitivity. After
    >>>> taking an ESD class at my new employer, I realize now how many
    >>>> things can be mishandled, and something can be packed with latent
    >>>> failures waiting to happen. I think it was something like 200V
    >>>> static discharge can cause problems. We can feel 6000V and up I
    >>>> think. New stuff for me from now on.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> And if it "hurts" when you get zapped it's over 20k volts.
    >>>
    >>> JC

    >>
    >> Just today at work, I was pulling off the top layer of a 4'x4' sticky
    >> mat at work where dirt from outside gets stickied off the bottom of
    >> shoes at the entrance to a clean room. I pulled off the layer very
    >> quickly, turned to a trash can sitting next to a metal locker, and
    >> BAM my arm jerked suddenly as a huge spark hit my arm that grazed the
    >> locker. It was way worse than a pull-off-a-sweater or
    >> shuffle-across-the-floor spark. Probably the worst I've ever
    >> experienced.
    >>
    >> I could only imagine what would have happened if I was holding a
    >> processor or some other electrical component. At least my area is a
    >> mechanical, not electrical area.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Phil

    > Before I retired we used the non-static 'booties' in electrical
    > areas, but I have seen those mats more and more even in electronic
    > clean rooms. I had no idea that they could hold that kind of a charge.


    Thinking about it, I remember the mat swirling around my arm with static
    charge just before I got it close to the trash can. The close proximity
    probably generated a huge voltage in my body before I grazed the locker.

    --
    Phil
     
    Phil, Jul 11, 2007
    #11
  12. Fishface

    Fishface Guest

    > He likes to play games, and I'm trying to get him to spring for an 8800GTS, but
    > he really wants to get an 8600GTS. For the money, I might try to steer him into
    > an X1950XT instead.


    I showed him the Crysis videos and he sprang for the MSI 8800GTS 640MB
    factory overclocked card from Newegg. It was cheaper at ZZF, but Newegg's
    "Standard Return Policy" gives you a year, so I figured that was worth the extra
    eleven bucks. It's pretty quiet, very sweet, and now I'm jealous.
     
    Fishface, Aug 2, 2007
    #12
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Ivan
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    376
    Leon Smith
    Dec 22, 2004
  2. Phil, Non-Squid

    New build, finally! E4300/Gigabyte 965P-DS3 @ 3.0

    Phil, Non-Squid, May 6, 2007, in forum: Overclocking
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    641
    Phil, Non-Squid
    May 6, 2007
  3. Phil, Non-Squid

    New build, finally! E4300/Gigabyte 965P-DS3 @ 3.0GHz

    Phil, Non-Squid, May 6, 2007, in forum: Overclocking
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    778
    Thomas
    May 6, 2007
  4. Phil, Non-Squid

    New build, finally! E4300/Gigabyte 965P-DS3 @ 3.0

    Phil, Non-Squid, May 6, 2007, in forum: Overclocking
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    706
    Phil, Non-Squid
    May 6, 2007
  5. DaveJ
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    702
    DaveJ
    Mar 5, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page