MobileMe Zombies

Discussion in 'Apple' started by John Varela, Jul 20, 2012.

  1. John Varela

    John Varela Guest

    Mobile Me is dead but it lingers on with an icon in my menu bar, an
    icon in System Preferences, an iDisk icon in the Finder's Go menu,
    etc.

    Can anyone point me at instructions for purging MobileMe from the
    system? 10.6.8.

    --
    John Varela
     
    John Varela, Jul 20, 2012
    #1
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  2. John Varela

    David Empson Guest

    John Varela <> wrote:

    > Mobile Me is dead but it lingers on with an icon in my menu bar, an
    > icon in System Preferences, an iDisk icon in the Finder's Go menu,
    > etc.
    >
    > Can anyone point me at instructions for purging MobileMe from the
    > system? 10.6.8.


    You can at least hide the visible signs on the menu bar and in Finder:

    Hold down the Command key and drag the MobileMe Sync icon down off the
    menu bar.

    Hold down the Command key and drag the iDisk icon out of the Finder
    sidebar.

    You can't easily get rid of MobileMe in System Preferences. That would
    require a software update from Apple, or an unsupported modification to
    the system.

    --
    David Empson
     
    David Empson, Jul 20, 2012
    #2
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  3. John Varela

    Lewis Guest

    In message <51W5y0sPNk52-pn2-OWCyBwBKLnXF@localhost>
    John Varela <> wrote:
    > Mobile Me is dead but it lingers on with an icon in my menu bar, an
    > icon in System Preferences, an iDisk icon in the Finder's Go menu,
    > etc.


    > Can anyone point me at instructions for purging MobileMe from the
    > system? 10.6.8.


    Install 10.8?


    --
    Maybe I should have seen it as some kind of sign, except I don't believe
    in them no more; no no, but I believe these things I can't forget, tho I
    don't see you anymore.
     
    Lewis, Jul 20, 2012
    #3
  4. John Varela

    John Varela Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jul 2012 04:00:36 UTC, (David
    Empson) wrote:

    > John Varela <> wrote:
    >
    > > Mobile Me is dead but it lingers on with an icon in my menu bar, an
    > > icon in System Preferences, an iDisk icon in the Finder's Go menu,
    > > etc.
    > >
    > > Can anyone point me at instructions for purging MobileMe from the
    > > system? 10.6.8.

    >
    > You can at least hide the visible signs on the menu bar and in Finder:
    >
    > Hold down the Command key and drag the MobileMe Sync icon down off the
    > menu bar.
    >
    > Hold down the Command key and drag the iDisk icon out of the Finder
    > sidebar.
    >
    > You can't easily get rid of MobileMe in System Preferences. That would
    > require a software update from Apple, or an unsupported modification to
    > the system.


    Thanks. I had already removed iDisk from the Finder sidebar but it
    remains in the Go menu. I purged some MobileMe things and the icon
    has disappeared from the menu bar; I don't know why. Today I found
    and removed some MobileMe items and even some .mac items from Little
    Snitch, but at least one .mac item can't be removed.

    I suppose this is part of Apple's incentivization for Mountain Lion.

    --
    John Varela
     
    John Varela, Jul 20, 2012
    #4
  5. John Varela

    John Varela Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jul 2012 04:59:09 UTC, Lewis
    <> wrote:

    > In message <51W5y0sPNk52-pn2-OWCyBwBKLnXF@localhost>
    > John Varela <> wrote:
    > > Mobile Me is dead but it lingers on with an icon in my menu bar, an
    > > icon in System Preferences, an iDisk icon in the Finder's Go menu,
    > > etc.

    >
    > > Can anyone point me at instructions for purging MobileMe from the
    > > system? 10.6.8.

    >
    > Install 10.8?


    Just as soon as they include Rosetta in 10.8 and retrofit iCloud to
    the g5.

    Actually, now that I have Dropbox, BusyCal, and MacHighway I don't
    need anything from MobileMe or its successor.

    --
    John Varela
     
    John Varela, Jul 20, 2012
    #5
  6. John Varela

    David Ritz Guest

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    On Friday, 20 July 2012 16:00 +1200,
    in article <1knjcts.tn2r3d1wzh259N%>,
    David Empson <> wrote:

    > You can't easily get rid of MobileMe in System Preferences. That would
    > require a software update from Apple, or an unsupported modification to
    > the system.


    Before doing _anything_, make absolutely certain that your disks are
    fully and thoroughly backed-up.

    /System/Library/PreferencePanes/MobileMe.prefPane

    Dragging the MobileMe.prefPane to the trash requires administrator
    privileges. You'll be prompted for your password. Once it's there,
    you should be able to safely delete the Preferences Pane.

    There are a slew of associated files, which may be harder to track
    down. Here's what I was able to turn up, relatively easily:

    ~/Library/Application\ Support/MobileMeSyncClient
    ~/Library/Preferences/MobileMeAccounts.plist
    ~/Library/Preferences/MobileMeAccounts.plist.lockfile

    These three items should be quite small. I don't have a problem with
    them becoming yet more accumulated cruft.

    There are some other items, which I'm leaving in place, as they may be
    used by other Apple Applications, PerferencesPanes or Plug-ins.

    At any rate, moving /System/Library/PreferencePanes/MobileMe.prefPane
    to the Trash, or renaming it, should have the effect of making it
    disappear from your System Preferences.

    HTH.

    - --
    David Ritz <>
    Be kind to animals; kiss a shark.

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    Comment: Public Keys: <http://dritz.home.mindspring.com/keys.txt>

    iEYEARECAAYFAlAJ4osACgkQUrwpmRoS3uuIagCfUCBn7GnqLC7nOYRd3X33KT9N
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    =buV1
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
     
    David Ritz, Jul 20, 2012
    #6
  7. John Varela

    gtr Guest

    On 2012-07-20 21:44:59 +0000, John Varela said:

    > I suppose this is part of Apple's incentivization for Mountain Lion.


    Would the word "incentive" work here as well?
     
    gtr, Jul 23, 2012
    #7
  8. John Varela

    Davoud Guest

    John Varela:
    > > I suppose this is part of Apple's incentivization for Mountain Lion.


    gtr:
    > Would the word "incentive" work here as well?


    Not really. It seems that made-up, big words are needed to lend
    importance to the word and to the user of the word. As an example,
    every manufacturer has a product line, but it takes a Big, Important
    Manufacturer to have an ecosystem. Apple's line of hand-held products,
    referred to as the "iOS ecosystem" by all really (self) Important
    People, springs to mind.

    Such language makes me want to visit trauma upon people's crania.

    --
    I agree with almost everything that you have said and almost everything that
    you will say in your entire life.

    usenet *at* davidillig dawt cawm
     
    Davoud, Jul 23, 2012
    #8
  9. John Varela

    gtr Guest

    On 2012-07-23 02:20:55 +0000, Davoud said:

    > Such language makes me want to visit trauma upon people's crania.


    Me, I just want to go upside their head.
     
    gtr, Jul 23, 2012
    #9
  10. John Varela

    Davoud Guest

    gtr:
    > >> Would the word "incentive" work here as well?


    Davoud:
    > > Not really. It seems that made-up, big words are needed to lend
    > > importance to the word and to the user of the word.


    Paul Sture wrote:
    > I may be wrong but I see things like "incentivization" as evidence of a
    > strong Germanic language heritage in the US.


    Incentivization is a neologism that is evidence only of the fact there
    are people who don't know any better than to use pompous, meaningless
    words. These folks haven't learned their Shakespeare, and they do not
    know that "...brevity is the soul of wit..." (though the passage in
    which that appears is cleverly ironic in that it contains much pompous
    language).

    The suffix -ation is of Latin, not Germanic, origin.

    As for a strong Germanic language heritage in the U.S., the primary
    language here is American English. English is a Germanic language. That
    means that our core vocabulary and core grammar are derived from
    proto-German. Our Germanic language heritage could hardly be much
    stronger than that, could it? Recent research reveals that English is
    much farther removed from German in time than was once thought, which
    accounts for the fact that the resemblance today is superficial. Our
    Germanic language heritage is further disguised by the borrowing of
    large numbers words from other languages, particularly Greek and Latin,
    but also Arabic, Hebrew, Hindi, Sanskrit, and numerous others.

    Did you know that that most German of cognates, berg, burg, and other
    variations, is, in fact, not German at all, but is derived from a
    Sanskrit word? It is cognate with the "-pore" in Singapore, for
    example, also the -bury in such names as Waterbury (a common American
    place name). In English we have it as burg, berg, burgh, bury, berry,
    and borough, for example. In French it appears in bourgeois. Original
    meaning: a walled city, usually on a hill. (Having a city on a hill
    served two purposes--it let you see the enemy coming and it avoided
    building cities on arable land.) City and hill together pretty well
    describe berg's various meanings in German, do they not?

    <http://www.davidillig.com/daoud.shtml>

    --
    I agree with almost everything that you have said and almost everything that
    you will say in your entire life.

    usenet *at* davidillig dawt cawm
     
    Davoud, Jul 23, 2012
    #10
  11. On 7/22/12 PDT 7:20 PM, Davoud wrote:
    > John Varela:
    >>> I suppose this is part of Apple's incentivization for Mountain Lion.

    >
    > gtr:
    >> Would the word "incentive" work here as well?

    >
    > Not really. It seems that made-up, big words are needed to lend
    > importance to the word and to the user of the word. As an example,
    > every manufacturer has a product line, but it takes a Big, Important
    > Manufacturer to have an ecosystem. Apple's line of hand-held products,
    > referred to as the "iOS ecosystem" by all really (self) Important
    > People, springs to mind.
    >
    > Such language makes me want to visit trauma upon people's crania.


    "Never use a big word, when a diminutive one will suffice", is my rule
    of thumb, attribution possibly Edwin Newman.

    As part of "Apple's incentive program" is what's meant, and I see the
    word used as OK. It's more active than "incentive"; therefor just
    "incentive" has a different meaning.

    Now, decrying the inflation of speech, how many times have you seen
    "more cold", or the use of "more" when there's a proper adjective
    already, uh, such as "colder", etc.
     
    John McWilliams, Jul 23, 2012
    #11
  12. John Varela

    Davoud Guest

    Davoud:
    > > <http://www.davidillig.com/daoud.shtml>


    Paul Sture:
    > The one that surprised me there was Betelgeuse :)


    That's one of my favorites. As a long-time amateur astronomer I have
    long known that star, but I didn't give a thought to its name until I
    learned Arabic and went to live in the Middle East for 10_ years. The
    name didn't sound quite right to me as an Arabic name.

    A little bit of research turned up the following. This name was
    transcribed from an Arabic manuscript into the Roman alphabet sometime
    in the mediaeval era. Now it turns out that the Arabic equivalents of Y
    and B are identical, except that the Y has two dots under it and the B
    has one dot under it.

    One can imagine a skilled transcriber working from an old, worn,
    manuscript by candle light and without the benefit of a native Arab
    scholar. One of the dots was missing, or the transcriber overlooked one
    of the dots, and a Y became a B. The Arabic name of the star is Yed
    al-Jawz, a construct form meaning "Hand of the Giant," or perhaps "Arm
    of the Giant." Please see
    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betelgeuse#Etymology>.

    --
    I agree with almost everything that you have said and almost everything that
    you will say in your entire life.

    usenet *at* davidillig dawt cawm
     
    Davoud, Jul 23, 2012
    #12
  13. John Varela

    John Varela Guest

    On Sun, 22 Jul 2012 23:45:44 UTC, gtr <> wrote:

    > On 2012-07-20 21:44:59 +0000, John Varela said:
    >
    > > I suppose this is part of Apple's incentivization for Mountain Lion.

    >
    > Would the word "incentive" work here as well?


    No.

    The difficulty of removing MobileMe from one's system is an
    incentive. Apple's actions in creating this difficulty is an
    incentivization.

    Learn to speak English. Find a good dictionary and use it.

    --
    John Varela
     
    John Varela, Jul 23, 2012
    #13
  14. John Varela

    Davoud Guest

    gtr:
    > >> >> Would the word "incentive" work here as well?


    Davoud:
    > >> > Not really. It seems that made-up, big words are needed to lend
    > >> > importance to the word and to the user of the word.


    Paul Sture:
    > >> I may be wrong but I see things like "incentivization" as evidence of a
    > >> strong Germanic language heritage in the US.


    Davoud:
    > > Incentivization is a neologism that is evidence only of the fact there
    > > are people who don't know any better than to use pompous, meaningless
    > > words.


    Paul Sture:
    > To be honest I was thinking of the German practice of agglutination
    > rather than the origin of the word elements, and I should have indicated
    > that in my reply.


    Still no. Agglutination is the evolved way in which German works. This
    is not the case in English, where the practice generally has no
    legitimate use except in special cases, such as when new terms,
    especially names in taxonomy, may be formed from agglutination of Latin
    or Greek words. In many cases what would be agglutination in German
    requires a hyphenated word in English.

    Of course, like all languages, we continue to borrow from a wide
    variety of languages. I do not know if "schadenfreude" (not capitalized
    in English because we don't capitalize nouns any more) is considered an
    English word yet or not, but it has been in use here for some years, at
    least in educated circles, and my feeling is it could gain permanent
    traction. Even though it is a long word by English standards, it is a
    good fit in English because we have no single word to express its
    meaning (OK, one, "epicaricacy," which comes from Greek, which is not
    nearly as mellifluous as "schadenfreude" and which nobody--including
    me--has ever heard of).

    Having said that we don't agglutinate words, I will now admit that we
    do, but we tend truncate them rather than use them whole. Words made
    like this are called "portmanteau words." Two that come to mind are
    "smog," from "smoke" and "fog," and "spork" from "spoon" and "fork." As
    far as I know, sporks are always made of plastic and are seen only in
    fast-food restaurants, where they are a profit booster.

    Other portmanteaux in English include "Microsoft" and "Amtrak."

    Finally, Schaden and Freude both have English cognates, "scathe" and
    "frith." The latter word is archaic and unknown in modern English.

    --
    I agree with almost everything that you have said and almost everything that
    you will say in your entire life.

    usenet *at* davidillig dawt cawm
     
    Davoud, Jul 23, 2012
    #14
  15. John Varela

    Wes Groleau Guest

    On 07-23-2012 11:10, Davoud wrote:
    > are people who don't know any better than to use pompous, meaningless


    Don't you mean "utilize" ?

    --
    Wes Groleau

    “Lewis's case for the existence of God is fallacious.â€
    "You mean like circular reasoning?â€
    “He believes in God. Therefore, he's fallacious."
     
    Wes Groleau, Jul 24, 2012
    #15
  16. John Varela

    Davoud Guest

    Davoud:
    > > are people who don't know any better than to use pompous, meaningless


    Wes Groleau:
    > Don't you mean "utilize" ?


    Thanks for the reminder. I really meant "...effect the utilization
    of..."

    --
    I agree with almost everything that you have said and almost everything that
    you will say in your entire life.

    usenet *at* davidillig dawt cawm
     
    Davoud, Jul 24, 2012
    #16
  17. John Varela

    Davoud Guest

    gtr:
    > > Would the word "incentive" work here as well?


    John Varela:
    > No.
    >
    > The difficulty of removing MobileMe from one's system is an
    > incentive. Apple's actions in creating this difficulty is an
    > incentivization.
    >
    > Learn to speak English. Find a good dictionary and use it.


    Boundless pomposity! That is a meaningless bit of bureaubabble.

    --
    I agree with almost everything that you have said and almost everything that
    you will say in your entire life.

    usenet *at* davidillig dawt cawm
     
    Davoud, Jul 24, 2012
    #17
  18. John Varela

    John Varela Guest

    On Tue, 24 Jul 2012 00:57:36 UTC, Davoud <> wrote:

    > gtr:
    > > > Would the word "incentive" work here as well?

    >
    > John Varela:
    > > No.
    > >
    > > The difficulty of removing MobileMe from one's system is an
    > > incentive. Apple's actions in creating this difficulty is an
    > > incentivization.
    > >
    > > Learn to speak English. Find a good dictionary and use it.

    >
    > Boundless pomposity! That is a meaningless bit of bureaubabble.


    What did you not understand about "Find a good dictionary and use
    it"?

    --
    John Varela
     
    John Varela, Jul 25, 2012
    #18
  19. John Varela

    Davoud Guest

    John Varela:
    > > > incentivization.


    Davoud:
    > > Boundless pomposity! That is a meaningless bit of bureaubabble.


    John Varela:
    > What did you not understand about "Find a good dictionary and use
    > it"?


    Beautiful, meaningful English doesn't come from finding words in
    dictionaries. It comes from reading the works of great authors and
    being educated by skilled speakers and writers. After all that, a style
    manual /may/ be of help, but it can't have been written by a New-Age
    product of global dumbing.

    It doesn't matter if "incentivization" is in wide use a thousand years
    from now; it will always be bad English because it will always be a
    pompous and ugly word that will never mean anything that cannot be
    expressed by a skilled speaker or writer with far more elegance.

    --
    I agree with almost everything that you have said and almost everything that
    you will say in your entire life.

    usenet *at* davidillig dawt cawm
     
    Davoud, Jul 25, 2012
    #19
  20. John Varela

    Joe Guest

    In article <>,
    Paul Sture <> wrote:

    > To be honest I was thinking of the German practice of agglutination
    > rather than the origin of the word elements, and I should have indicated
    > that in my reply.


    As a grad student, I studied Wahrscheinlichkeitsrechnungtheorie, mostly
    in English, though, and some in Russian. :)

    --- Joe
     
    Joe, Jul 25, 2012
    #20
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