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Monitoring Fan RPM

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by Peter, Nov 7, 2003.

  1. Peter

    Peter Guest

    I plugged 2 of my case fans into the motherboard fan headers to monitor
    their RPM. I'm thinking of installing a fan controller, namely the
    Coolermaster Aerogate II. If I do that, software based fan monitoring
    program will stop working (because the fans won't plug to the motherboard).

    One way to solve the problem is to "redirect" the RPM feedback wires to the
    motherboard (the 12V and ground wires still go to the fan controller), but
    it won't work in this case because the Aerogate also needs the feedback
    wires to display the RPM.

    Can I split the feedback (yellow) wires into two? One goes to the Aerogate
    (together with the 12V and GND), and the other one goes to the motherboard,
    will it affect the accuracy of reported RPM? I know RPM detection is based
    on the pulses per second, but I'm not sure if splitting the wire will weaken
    the signal thus casuing a lower reported RPM?
     
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  2. nightic

    nightic Guest

    "Peter" <> wrote in message
    news:TwGqb.365$...
    > I plugged 2 of my case fans into the motherboard fan headers to monitor
    > their RPM. I'm thinking of installing a fan controller, namely the
    > Coolermaster Aerogate II. If I do that, software based fan monitoring
    > program will stop working (because the fans won't plug to the

    motherboard).
    >
    > One way to solve the problem is to "redirect" the RPM feedback wires to

    the
    > motherboard (the 12V and ground wires still go to the fan controller), but
    > it won't work in this case because the Aerogate also needs the feedback
    > wires to display the RPM.
    >
    > Can I split the feedback (yellow) wires into two? One goes to the

    Aerogate
    > (together with the 12V and GND), and the other one goes to the

    motherboard,
    > will it affect the accuracy of reported RPM? I know RPM detection is

    based
    > on the pulses per second, but I'm not sure if splitting the wire will

    weaken
    > the signal thus casuing a lower reported RPM?




    It should be fine, in fact 3 pin-to-4 pin adaptor leads which feature a
    seperate RPM-monitoring cable are readily available:

    http://tinyurl.com/u1au
     
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  3. nightic

    nightic Guest

    "nightic" <> wrote in message
    news:bofdbs$1c31k7$-berlin.de...
    >
    > "Peter" <> wrote in message
    > news:TwGqb.365$...
    > > I plugged 2 of my case fans into the motherboard fan headers to monitor
    > > their RPM. I'm thinking of installing a fan controller, namely the
    > > Coolermaster Aerogate II. If I do that, software based fan monitoring
    > > program will stop working (because the fans won't plug to the

    > motherboard).
    > >
    > > One way to solve the problem is to "redirect" the RPM feedback wires to

    > the
    > > motherboard (the 12V and ground wires still go to the fan controller),

    but
    > > it won't work in this case because the Aerogate also needs the feedback
    > > wires to display the RPM.
    > >
    > > Can I split the feedback (yellow) wires into two? One goes to the

    > Aerogate
    > > (together with the 12V and GND), and the other one goes to the

    > motherboard,
    > > will it affect the accuracy of reported RPM? I know RPM detection is

    > based
    > > on the pulses per second, but I'm not sure if splitting the wire will

    > weaken
    > > the signal thus casuing a lower reported RPM?

    >
    >
    >
    > It should be fine, in fact 3 pin-to-4 pin adaptor leads which feature a
    > seperate RPM-monitoring cable are readily available:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/u1au




    Zalman themselves include the 3 pin-to-3 pin version of the above described
    cable with their ZM-FC1 fan controller but I am unsure as to where you can
    buy these leads seperately:

    http://tinyurl.com/u1b9
     
  4. nightic

    nightic Guest

    "nightic" <> wrote in message
    news:bofdrs$1drddj$-berlin.de...
    >
    > "nightic" <> wrote in message
    > news:bofdbs$1c31k7$-berlin.de...
    > >
    > > "Peter" <> wrote in message
    > > news:TwGqb.365$...
    > > > I plugged 2 of my case fans into the motherboard fan headers to

    monitor
    > > > their RPM. I'm thinking of installing a fan controller, namely the
    > > > Coolermaster Aerogate II. If I do that, software based fan monitoring
    > > > program will stop working (because the fans won't plug to the

    > > motherboard).
    > > >
    > > > One way to solve the problem is to "redirect" the RPM feedback wires

    to
    > > the
    > > > motherboard (the 12V and ground wires still go to the fan controller),

    > but
    > > > it won't work in this case because the Aerogate also needs the

    feedback
    > > > wires to display the RPM.
    > > >
    > > > Can I split the feedback (yellow) wires into two? One goes to the

    > > Aerogate
    > > > (together with the 12V and GND), and the other one goes to the

    > > motherboard,
    > > > will it affect the accuracy of reported RPM? I know RPM detection is

    > > based
    > > > on the pulses per second, but I'm not sure if splitting the wire will

    > > weaken
    > > > the signal thus casuing a lower reported RPM?

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > It should be fine, in fact 3 pin-to-4 pin adaptor leads which feature a
    > > seperate RPM-monitoring cable are readily available:
    > >
    > > http://tinyurl.com/u1au

    >
    >
    >
    > Zalman themselves include the 3 pin-to-3 pin version of the above

    described
    > cable with their ZM-FC1 fan controller but I am unsure as to where you can
    > buy these leads seperately:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/u1b9



    Typo:
    I mean "ZM-MFC1 fan controller...".
     
  5. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Thanks. I know where to get fan headers and pins, so I can solder my own
    wires, that's not a problem.

    However, the Zalman scenario is different than mine. The ZM-MFC1 only
    controls the voltage to adjust the fan speed, it doesn't monitor the RPM, so
    there's nothing behind the "feedback" pin on the faceplate, it simply
    re-route the feedback wire to the motherboard.

    The Coolermaster Aerogate II that I'm interested in has both functions - fan
    speed adjustment and RPM display - therefore, it actually reads the pulses
    coming from the feedback wire. My concern is that if I "intercept" the
    feedback and wire it to the motherboard, now there're two places reading the
    pulses: 1) Areogate, and 2) motherboard, would that weaken the signals and
    causing incorrect RPM readings?

    For each turn (revolution) that the fan makes, the magnetic field changes
    twice and produces two pulses, RPM sensing devices are basically pulse
    sensors that detect number of pulses per second (Hz). If the fan produces
    100 pulses per second, it means it has turn 50 times (100 divided by 2),
    which is equivalent to 3000 RPM (50 times 60).

    I don't know what will happen if I connect the fan's feedback wire to two
    RPM sensors (Aerogate and motherboard) and that's why I'm posting this.


    "nightic" <> wrote in message
    news:bofdvh$1donp9$-berlin.de...
    >
    > "nightic" <> wrote in message
    > news:bofdrs$1drddj$-berlin.de...
    > >
    > > "nightic" <> wrote in message
    > > news:bofdbs$1c31k7$-berlin.de...
    > > >
    > > > "Peter" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:TwGqb.365$...
    > > > > I plugged 2 of my case fans into the motherboard fan headers to

    > monitor
    > > > > their RPM. I'm thinking of installing a fan controller, namely the
    > > > > Coolermaster Aerogate II. If I do that, software based fan

    monitoring
    > > > > program will stop working (because the fans won't plug to the
    > > > motherboard).
    > > > >
    > > > > One way to solve the problem is to "redirect" the RPM feedback wires

    > to
    > > > the
    > > > > motherboard (the 12V and ground wires still go to the fan

    controller),
    > > but
    > > > > it won't work in this case because the Aerogate also needs the

    > feedback
    > > > > wires to display the RPM.
    > > > >
    > > > > Can I split the feedback (yellow) wires into two? One goes to the
    > > > Aerogate
    > > > > (together with the 12V and GND), and the other one goes to the
    > > > motherboard,
    > > > > will it affect the accuracy of reported RPM? I know RPM detection

    is
    > > > based
    > > > > on the pulses per second, but I'm not sure if splitting the wire

    will
    > > > weaken
    > > > > the signal thus casuing a lower reported RPM?
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > It should be fine, in fact 3 pin-to-4 pin adaptor leads which feature

    a
    > > > seperate RPM-monitoring cable are readily available:
    > > >
    > > > http://tinyurl.com/u1au

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Zalman themselves include the 3 pin-to-3 pin version of the above

    > described
    > > cable with their ZM-FC1 fan controller but I am unsure as to where you

    can
    > > buy these leads seperately:
    > >
    > > http://tinyurl.com/u1b9

    >
    >
    > Typo:
    > I mean "ZM-MFC1 fan controller...".
    >
    >
     
  6. nightic

    nightic Guest

    "Peter" <> wrote in message
    news:gUIqb.549$...
    > Thanks. I know where to get fan headers and pins, so I can solder my own
    > wires, that's not a problem.
    >
    > However, the Zalman scenario is different than mine. The ZM-MFC1 only
    > controls the voltage to adjust the fan speed, it doesn't monitor the RPM,

    so
    > there's nothing behind the "feedback" pin on the faceplate, it simply
    > re-route the feedback wire to the motherboard.
    >
    > The Coolermaster Aerogate II that I'm interested in has both functions -

    fan
    > speed adjustment and RPM display - therefore, it actually reads the pulses
    > coming from the feedback wire. My concern is that if I "intercept" the
    > feedback and wire it to the motherboard, now there're two places reading

    the
    > pulses: 1) Areogate, and 2) motherboard, would that weaken the signals and
    > causing incorrect RPM readings?
    >
    > For each turn (revolution) that the fan makes, the magnetic field changes
    > twice and produces two pulses, RPM sensing devices are basically pulse
    > sensors that detect number of pulses per second (Hz). If the fan produces
    > 100 pulses per second, it means it has turn 50 times (100 divided by 2),
    > which is equivalent to 3000 RPM (50 times 60).
    >
    > I don't know what will happen if I connect the fan's feedback wire to two
    > RPM sensors (Aerogate and motherboard) and that's why I'm posting this.



    That'll teach me to only skim posts before replying - d'oh!
     
  7. ~misfit~

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Peter wrote:
    > Thanks. I know where to get fan headers and pins, so I can solder my
    > own wires, that's not a problem.
    >
    > However, the Zalman scenario is different than mine. The ZM-MFC1 only
    > controls the voltage to adjust the fan speed, it doesn't monitor the
    > RPM, so there's nothing behind the "feedback" pin on the faceplate,
    > it simply re-route the feedback wire to the motherboard.
    >
    > The Coolermaster Aerogate II that I'm interested in has both
    > functions - fan speed adjustment and RPM display - therefore, it
    > actually reads the pulses coming from the feedback wire. My concern
    > is that if I "intercept" the feedback and wire it to the motherboard,
    > now there're two places reading the pulses: 1) Areogate, and 2)
    > motherboard, would that weaken the signals and causing incorrect RPM
    > readings?
    >
    > For each turn (revolution) that the fan makes, the magnetic field
    > changes twice and produces two pulses, RPM sensing devices are
    > basically pulse sensors that detect number of pulses per second (Hz).
    > If the fan produces 100 pulses per second, it means it has turn 50
    > times (100 divided by 2), which is equivalent to 3000 RPM (50 times
    > 60).
    >
    > I don't know what will happen if I connect the fan's feedback wire to
    > two RPM sensors (Aerogate and motherboard) and that's why I'm posting
    > this.


    Umm, can't tell you categorically but I'm sure it will be fine.
    --
    ~misfit~
     
  8. Peter wrote:
    [...]
    > I'm thinking of installing a fan controller,
    > namely the Coolermaster Aerogate II. If I do that, software based
    > fan monitoring program will stop working (because the fans won't plug
    > to the motherboard).

    [...]
    > Can I split the feedback (yellow) wires into two? One goes to the
    > Aerogate (together with the 12V and GND), and the other one goes to
    > the motherboard, will it affect the accuracy of reported RPM? I know
    > RPM detection is based on the pulses per second, but I'm not sure if
    > splitting the wire will weaken the signal thus casuing a lower
    > reported RPM?


    Unless your measurement circuit draws enough current to smoke the wires in
    the fan, you should be fine.

    --
    Michael Brown
    www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :)
    Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open
     
  9. Peter

    Peter Guest

    It didn't work. Splitting the RPM feedback (yellow) wire into two (one goes
    to the motherboard, the other goes to the Aerogate II), the motherboard
    reports the RPM correctly, however, Aerogate failed to detect the RPM.
    Aerogate starts to report the correct RPM once the other wire is unplugged
    from the motherboard.

    I don't understand why, but that's how it turned out to be.


    "Peter" <> wrote in message
    news:TwGqb.365$...
    > I plugged 2 of my case fans into the motherboard fan headers to monitor
    > their RPM. I'm thinking of installing a fan controller, namely the
    > Coolermaster Aerogate II. If I do that, software based fan monitoring
    > program will stop working (because the fans won't plug to the

    motherboard).
    >
    > One way to solve the problem is to "redirect" the RPM feedback wires to

    the
    > motherboard (the 12V and ground wires still go to the fan controller), but
    > it won't work in this case because the Aerogate also needs the feedback
    > wires to display the RPM.
    >
    > Can I split the feedback (yellow) wires into two? One goes to the

    Aerogate
    > (together with the 12V and GND), and the other one goes to the

    motherboard,
    > will it affect the accuracy of reported RPM? I know RPM detection is

    based
    > on the pulses per second, but I'm not sure if splitting the wire will

    weaken
    > the signal thus casuing a lower reported RPM?
    >
    >
     
  10. Spajky

    Spajky Guest

    On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 23:04:21 GMT, "Peter" <> wrote:

    >It didn't work. Splitting the RPM feedback (yellow) wire into two (one goes
    >to the motherboard, the other goes to the Aerogate II), the motherboard
    >reports the RPM correctly, however, Aerogate failed to detect the RPM.
    >Aerogate starts to report the correct RPM once the other wire is unplugged
    >from the motherboard.
    >
    >I don't understand why, but that's how it turned out to be.


    try this: RPM sensing:

    FAN ---i--->I------ MoBo
    rpm I
    I---->I ----- Aerogate

    (separate the tacho wire with 2 diodes
    >I (anode-cathode/marked!)


    -- Regards, SPAJKY
    & visit site - http://www.spajky.vze.com
    Celly-III OC-ed,"Tualatin on BX-Slot1-MoBo!"
    E-mail AntiSpam: remove ##
     
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