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My temp for CPU is 44 for the northbridge - is this normal?

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by daviddschool@gmail.com, May 13, 2008.

  1. Guest

    My temp for CPU is 44 for the northbridge - is this normal?
    I have just recently upgraded my motherboard and I noticed my CPU
    northbridge temp is at 44 degrees - is this ok? The CPU temp is at a
    steady 25, but the northbridge is the one that is high. Should I
    worry?
    I am using a pent 4 D 3.0 ghz.
     
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  2. Augustus

    Augustus Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My temp for CPU is 44 for the northbridge - is this normal?
    > I have just recently upgraded my motherboard and I noticed my CPU
    > northbridge temp is at 44 degrees - is this ok? The CPU temp is at a
    > steady 25, but the northbridge is the one that is high. Should I
    > worry?
    > I am using a pent 4 D 3.0 ghz.


    Highly unlikley that your actual P4D 3.0Ghz CPU temp is 25C if this is an
    air cooled rig, no matter what the cooler. 44C for the m/b chipset diode
    reading isn't out of line. What's the ambient room temp and how well
    ventilated is the case?
     
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  3. Guest

    It is typical room temperate and the case is wide open. I think I
    might have too much paste between the chip and the fan though -
    someone told me too much can lead to higher temperatures...should I be
    worried? Should I crack it open and get rid of the paste and reapply?

    On May 13, 7:14 pm, "Augustus" <no_one@no_where.net> wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > My temp for CPU is 44 for the northbridge - is this normal?
    > > I have just recently upgraded my motherboard and I noticed my CPU
    > > northbridge temp is at 44 degrees - is this ok? The CPU temp is at a
    > > steady 25, but the northbridge is the one that is high. Should I
    > > worry?
    > > I am using a pent 4 D 3.0 ghz.

    >
    > Highly unlikley that your actual P4D 3.0Ghz CPU temp is 25C if this is an
    > air cooled rig, no matter what the cooler. 44C for the m/b chipset diode
    > reading isn't out of line. What's the ambient room temp and how well
    > ventilated is the case?
     
  4. Guest

    You are right, I didn't give enough info, so here goes :
    The program I am using is called :
    NXsensor : it has four readins - two hard drive readings, a processor
    and Northbridge. That is where I got the information from,
    I built the computer myself. I had my old p5p800SE motherboard fail
    on me and I purchased a quick P5GC-MX/1333 ASUS motherboard to fill in
    the gap. When I change the motherboard, I didn't take off the thermal
    paste from the original installation and put a little more on it.
    Room temperature is about 72 degree I would say, maybe a bit higher.
    The case is open, I have not overclocked it or changed any of the
    voltage settings. There is one cooling fan on the processor and as I
    have said, I leave the case open. This seems to be the operating
    temperature for just surfing and nothing really taxing on the system.
    Interestingly enough, it has dropped to a steady 41 degrees today.
    First time this week.
    Sorry about my ignorance in this...


    >
    > >> Highly unlikley that your actual P4D 3.0Ghz CPU temp is 25C if this is an
    > >> air cooled rig, no matter what the cooler. 44C for the m/b chipset diode
    > >> reading isn't out of line. What's the ambient room temp and how well
    > >> ventilated is the case?
     
  5. Ed Medlin

    Ed Medlin Guest

    "Phil Weldon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > 'daviddschool' wrote:
    >> You are right, I didn't give enough info, so here goes :
    >> The program I am using is called :
    >> NXsensor : it has four readins - two hard drive readings, a processor
    >> and Northbridge. That is where I got the information from,
    >> I built the computer myself. I had my old p5p800SE motherboard fail
    >> on me and I purchased a quick P5GC-MX/1333 ASUS motherboard to fill in
    >> the gap. When I change the motherboard, I didn't take off the thermal
    >> paste from the original installation and put a little more on it.
    >> Room temperature is about 72 degree I would say, maybe a bit higher.
    >> The case is open, I have not overclocked it or changed any of the
    >> voltage settings. There is one cooling fan on the processor and as I
    >> have said, I leave the case open. This seems to be the operating
    >> temperature for just surfing and nothing really taxing on the system.
    >> Interestingly enough, it has dropped to a steady 41 degrees today.
    >> First time this week.

    > _____
    >
    > With a room temperature of ~ 72 F ( ~ 22 C ), the 25 C you report is too
    > low to be the actual Northbridge chip temperature, and far too low to be
    > the CPU temperature. 'Just surfing and nothing really taxing on the
    > system' could mean that the CPU is actually idle most of the time, so 45 C
    > (or 41 C) could be reasonable for the CPU temperature.
    >
    > It seems that NXsensor is telling you things it doesn't really know. What
    > hard drive temperature(s) does it report? There is little mention of
    > NXsensor on the Internet (accessed via a Google search); I downloaded it
    > and tried it on a Vista system, but it wouldn't function. I'd recommend
    > you avoid installing an applet with such a thin reputation and instead try
    > to use ASUS Probe (I think that's the correct name) supplied by your
    > motherboard manufacturer. There are several other monitoring applets
    > (like CPU Cool or CPUz) available that may work correctly for your system.
    >
    > Getting a correct temperature report from a monitoring applet depends on
    > the particular monitoring chip(s) the motherboard uses AND how the
    > motherboard manufacturer implements the sensor (what external components -
    > capacitors and resistors are used; and for the motherboard sensor, whether
    > a transistor, diode, or thermistor is used.)
    >
    > The generally done thing here (alt.comp.hardware.overclocking) is to
    > record temperature readings while the CPU is idle AND when the CPU is
    > under the heaviest possible workload. Then you have a basis to compare
    > your system temperatures with the system temperatures of other posters.
    > The high stress temperatures are the most important, the idle temperatures
    > are mainly useful in diagnosing WHAT exactly is wrong with your cooling
    > when the high stress temperature are too high ( ~ 70 C for a Dell box, ~
    > 60 C for a home built system with adequate ventilation, ~ 50 C [ideally]
    > for a system you overclock [overclocking depends on trading temperature
    > operating margin for clock speed margin, among other things]).
    >
    > If Fahrenheit temperatures are native for you, bite the bullet and get
    > your computer system temperatures in Celsius, then you will only have to
    > convert the room temperature, and your numbers will be on the same scale
    > that is generally used in this newsgroup (and I suppose in other
    > overclocking groups.)
    >
    > Depending on where the motherboard temperature sensor is located, the
    > temperature at that spot is likely to be lower with the case CLOSED and
    > with at least one or two 80 mm or larger system case fans.
    >
    > At any rate, Intel CPUs don't really fail because of high temperatures;
    > they lock up and cool off before the high temperature trip sensor on the
    > CPU chip itself ever gets hot enough to switch the CPU off to cool it
    > down.
    >
    > Bottom line, get real temperatures before you change anything but the
    > temperature monitoring applet.
    >
    > Phil Weldon
    >


    I have an EM64T 3.0ghz @ 3.6 in a system with just slightly better than
    the stock Intel HS/Fan and I believe it should run at about the same temps
    as the 'D' processor for comparison (at least as close as anything else I
    have here....:). They run fairly warm in the best of conditions. Mine idles
    at around 50C but maxes out under stress in the mid/upper 60sC. This is in a
    well ventilated Lian Li PC60 case with room temps at 20-22C (68-70F) and
    ambient case temp (thermistor hanging in middle of case not close to heat
    sources) of about 27C. It is a 'good' performer and very stable even with
    the warm temps. I have had it running as a file server/backup system with a
    couple of TBs of storage for a year or so 24/7. Cooler is always better, but
    some of the later P4 class processors just ran hot but seem to handle it ok.
    As Phil suggested, try and switch to Celsius when talking temps since
    that is what all of us have been thinking in over the years and my old mind
    doesn't do conversions very well any more.......:).

    Ed
     
  6. Guest

    Ok, I have installed Asus Probe and this is what it says :

    CPU - runs fbetween 41 and 50 C - is is dropping as I write this
    email, probably because of the startup of the system? It don't know
    why it is fluctuating, because I am not using anything but email, but
    you folks seem to more about this then I ever will. I don't see
    anything for the HD temps, but Asus Probe II has
    Vcore - 1.30,
    +3.3 - 3.26V
    +5 - 5.04
    +12 - 11.93
    CPU 40-50 C
    CPU - 2596 RPM.

    I am not sure what the first set of numbers are but the Nexsensor, is
    says my Seagate and Maxtor hard drives are functioning at around 40 C
    respectively.

    I tried CPUZ but didn't see anything for temperature in that
    application.
    I ran some applications like an NLE, VLC player, SPACEtime 3d,
    Dreamweaver, FTP program, both browsers and it went as high as 47. I
    then went into my NLE And started rendering out while surfing and it
    surged to 57 C and that is when I fiddling around with it.
    Does this help?

    > > _____

    >
    > > With a room temperature of ~ 72 F ( ~ 22 C ), the 25 C you report is too
    > > low to be the actual Northbridge chip temperature, and far too low to be
    > > the CPU temperature. 'Just surfing and nothing really taxing on the
    > > system' could mean that the CPU is actually idle most of the time, so 45 C
    > > (or 41 C) could be reasonable for the CPU temperature.

    >
    > > It seems that NXsensor is telling you things it doesn't really know. What
    > > hard drive temperature(s) does it report? There is little mention of
    > > NXsensor on the Internet (accessed via a Google search); I downloaded it
    > > and tried it on a Vista system, but it wouldn't function. I'd recommend
    > > you avoid installing an applet with such a thin reputation and instead try
    > > to use ASUS Probe (I think that's the correct name) supplied by your
    > > motherboard manufacturer. There are several other monitoring applets
    > > (like CPU Cool or CPUz) available that may work correctly for your system.

    >
    > > Getting a correct temperature report from a monitoring applet depends on
    > > the particular monitoring chip(s) the motherboard uses AND how the
    > > motherboard manufacturer implements the sensor (what external components -
    > > capacitors and resistors are used; and for the motherboard sensor, whether
    > > a transistor, diode, or thermistor is used.)

    >
    > > The generally done thing here (alt.comp.hardware.overclocking) is to
    > > record temperature readings while the CPU is idle AND when the CPU is
    > > under the heaviest possible workload. Then you have a basis to compare
    > > your system temperatures with the system temperatures of other posters.
    > > The high stress temperatures are the most important, the idle temperatures
    > > are mainly useful in diagnosing WHAT exactly is wrong with your cooling
    > > when the high stress temperature are too high ( ~ 70 C for a Dell box, ~
    > > 60 C for a home built system with adequate ventilation, ~ 50 C [ideally]
    > > for a system you overclock [overclocking depends on trading temperature
    > > operating margin for clock speed margin, among other things]).

    >
    > > If Fahrenheit temperatures are native for you, bite the bullet and get
    > > your computer system temperatures in Celsius, then you will only have to
    > > convert the room temperature, and your numbers will be on the same scale
    > > that is generally used in this newsgroup (and I suppose in other
    > > overclocking groups.)

    >
    > > Depending on where the motherboard temperature sensor is located, the
    > > temperature at that spot is likely to be lower with the case CLOSED and
    > > with at least one or two 80 mm or larger system case fans.

    >
    > > At any rate, Intel CPUs don't really fail because of high temperatures;
    > > they lock up and cool off before the high temperature trip sensor on the
    > > CPU chip itself ever gets hot enough to switch the CPU off to cool it
    > > down.

    >
    > > Bottom line, get real temperatures before you change anything but the
    > > temperature monitoring applet.

    >
    > > Phil Weldon

    >
    > I have an EM64T 3.0ghz @ 3.6 in a system with just slightly better than
    > the stock Intel HS/Fan and I believe it should run at about the same temps
    > as the 'D' processor for comparison (at least as close as anything else I
    > have here....:). They run fairly warm in the best of conditions. Mine idles
    > at around 50C but maxes out under stress in the mid/upper 60sC. This is in a
    > well ventilated Lian Li PC60 case with room temps at 20-22C (68-70F) and
    > ambient case temp (thermistor hanging in middle of case not close to heat
    > sources) of about 27C. It is a 'good' performer and very stable even with
    > the warm temps. I have had it running as a file server/backup system with a
    > couple of TBs of storage for a year or so 24/7. Cooler is always better, but
    > some of the later P4 class processors just ran hot but seem to handle it ok.
    > As Phil suggested, try and switch to Celsius when talking temps since
    > that is what all of us have been thinking in over the years and my old mind
    > doesn't do conversions very well any more.......:).
    >
    > Ed
     
  7. Guest

    Ok, I have installed Asus Probe and this is what it says :

    CPU - runs fbetween 41 and 50 C - is is dropping as I write this
    email, probably because of the startup of the system? It don't know
    why it is fluctuating, because I am not using anything but email, but
    you folks seem to more about this then I ever will. I don't see
    anything for the HD temps, but Asus Probe II has
    Vcore - 1.30,
    +3.3 - 3.26V
    +5 - 5.04
    +12 - 11.93
    CPU 40-50 C
    CPU - 2596 RPM.

    I am not sure what the first set of numbers are but the Nexsensor, is
    says my Seagate and Maxtor hard drives are functioning at around 40 C
    respectively.

    I tried CPUZ but didn't see anything for temperature in that
    application.
    I ran some applications like an NLE, VLC player, SPACEtime 3d,
    Dreamweaver, FTP program, both browsers and it went as high as 47. I
    then went into my NLE And started rendering out while surfing and it
    surged to 57 C and that is when I STOPPED fiddling around with it.
    Does this help?

    > > Depending on where the motherboard temperature sensor is located, the
    > > temperature at that spot is likely to be lower with the case CLOSED and
    > > with at least one or two 80 mm or larger system case fans.

    >
    > > At any rate, Intel CPUs don't really fail because of high temperatures;
    > > they lock up and cool off before the high temperature trip sensor on the
    > > CPU chip itself ever gets hot enough to switch the CPU off to cool it
    > > down.

    >
    > > Bottom line, get real temperatures before you change anything but the
    > > temperature monitoring applet.

    >
    > > Phil Weldon

    >
    > I have an EM64T 3.0ghz @ 3.6 in a system with just slightly better than
    > the stock Intel HS/Fan and I believe it should run at about the same temps
    > as the 'D' processor for comparison (at least as close as anything else I
    > have here....:). They run fairly warm in the best of conditions. Mine idles
    > at around 50C but maxes out under stress in the mid/upper 60sC. This is in a
    > well ventilated Lian Li PC60 case with room temps at 20-22C (68-70F) and
    > ambient case temp (thermistor hanging in middle of case not close to heat
    > sources) of about 27C. It is a 'good' performer and very stable even with
    > the warm temps. I have had it running as a file server/backup system with a
    > couple of TBs of storage for a year or so 24/7. Cooler is always better, but
    > some of the later P4 class processors just ran hot but seem to handle it ok.
    > As Phil suggested, try and switch to Celsius when talking temps since
    > that is what all of us have been thinking in over the years and my old mind
    > doesn't do conversions very well any more.......:).
    >
    > Ed
     
  8. Augustus

    Augustus Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ok, I have installed Asus Probe and this is what it says :
    >
    > CPU - runs fbetween 41 and 50 C - is is dropping as I write this
    > email, probably because of the startup of the system? It don't know
    > why it is fluctuating, because I am not using anything but email, but
    > you folks seem to more about this then I ever will.


    <snip>

    >I ran some applications like an NLE, VLC player, SPACEtime 3d,
    >Dreamweaver, FTP program, both browsers and it went as high as 47. I
    >then went into my NLE And started rendering out while surfing and it
    >surged to 57 C and that is when I STOPPED fiddling around with it.
    >Does this help?


    Your temperatures and variations you are seeing are 100% normal and are
    actually on the lower operating range for a 3.0Ghz P4D setup. Just to give
    you a comparison from a newer setup, my E8400 running at stock voltage but
    at 3.6Ghz runs at 47C idle and at 57 to59C under 100% load on both cores
    with Prime95 in an Antec 182 case with added cooling. (Room temp:22C)
    Running at 100% stock (3.0Ghz ) with a decent Coolermaster hs/f it would
    idle at 37C and go to 45-47 full load.
     
  9. Guest

    Ok, so it sounds like I don't have anything to worry about. Now, if
    it does over-heat - what is the worse thing that will happen? Will it
    fry my HD's? The motherboard? The processor? Does it have auto-shut
    down's if it gets too hot?

    >
    > Your temperatures and variations you are seeing are 100% normal and are
    > actually on the lower operating range for a 3.0Ghz P4D setup. Just to give
    > you a comparison from a newer setup, my E8400 running at stock voltage but
    > at 3.6Ghz runs at 47C idle and at 57 to59C under 100% load on both cores
    > with Prime95 in an Antec 182 case with added cooling. (Room temp:22C)
    > Running at 100% stock (3.0Ghz ) with a decent Coolermaster hs/f it would
    > idle at 37C and go to 45-47 full load.
     
  10. Augustus

    Augustus Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ok, so it sounds like I don't have anything to worry about. Now, if
    > it does over-heat - what is the worse thing that will happen? Will it
    > fry my HD's? The motherboard? The processor? Does it have auto-shut
    > down's if it gets too hot?
    >
    >>
    >> Your temperatures and variations you are seeing are 100% normal and are
    >> actually on the lower operating range for a 3.0Ghz P4D setup. Just to
    >> give
    >> you a comparison from a newer setup, my E8400 running at stock voltage
    >> but
    >> at 3.6Ghz runs at 47C idle and at 57 to59C under 100% load on both cores
    >> with Prime95 in an Antec 182 case with added cooling. (Room temp:22C)
    >> Running at 100% stock (3.0Ghz ) with a decent Coolermaster hs/f it would
    >> idle at 37C and go to 45-47 full load.

    >

    Well, like Ed or Phil said, the CPU will simply lock up without causing any
    physical damage or issues. But believe me, you are nowhere near this level.
    My brother had (bought new at the time) a Dell XPS box with a P4D Extreme
    Edition 3.8Ghz unit in it and the temps off that thing were extreme to say
    the least...almost double yours...yet it was 100% stable in gaming and
    everything else.
     
  11. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Augustus wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Ok, so it sounds like I don't have anything to worry about. Now, if
    >> it does over-heat - what is the worse thing that will happen? Will it
    >> fry my HD's? The motherboard? The processor? Does it have auto-shut
    >> down's if it gets too hot?
    >>
    >>> Your temperatures and variations you are seeing are 100% normal and are
    >>> actually on the lower operating range for a 3.0Ghz P4D setup. Just to
    >>> give
    >>> you a comparison from a newer setup, my E8400 running at stock voltage
    >>> but
    >>> at 3.6Ghz runs at 47C idle and at 57 to59C under 100% load on both cores
    >>> with Prime95 in an Antec 182 case with added cooling. (Room temp:22C)
    >>> Running at 100% stock (3.0Ghz ) with a decent Coolermaster hs/f it would
    >>> idle at 37C and go to 45-47 full load.

    > Well, like Ed or Phil said, the CPU will simply lock up without causing any
    > physical damage or issues. But believe me, you are nowhere near this level.
    > My brother had (bought new at the time) a Dell XPS box with a P4D Extreme
    > Edition 3.8Ghz unit in it and the temps off that thing were extreme to say
    > the least...almost double yours...yet it was 100% stable in gaming and
    > everything else.
    >


    Both the Athlon64 or later, and contemporary LGA775 socketed processors from Intel,
    have THERMTRIP. Both companies make processors which have the ability to
    detect overheat. THERMTRIP is then wired into the logic that controls the
    ATX power supply. So if the heatsink clip snaps, and the heatsink falls off, in a
    second or two, the computer will shut off.

    The second protection mechanism is throttling. It might start to be applied
    at a point about 20C below THERMTRIP. Throttling is a function applied to the
    effective processor clock - the processor is put to sleep for short intervals,
    as a thermal control measure. What this does, is rob the user of the performance
    they paid for. What you see when this is working, is that the processor seems
    to have a "ceiling" for temperature, and won't rise above a certain point.
    But your performance might not be as good as normal, if you reach that point.

    This is why people go to the trouble of monitoring CPU temperature, in order
    to avoid throttling.

    An example of a program that loads the processor nicely, is Prime95. This version
    runs in Windows, and starts a thread of execution per core. There are other downloads
    for Linux, and I've also run multiple copies of an older version in a Linux
    environment.

    http://www.mersenne.org/gimps/p95v255a.zip

    Speedfan, a monitoring program from almico.com , will monitor both motherboard
    related temperatures, and will also display hard drive temperatures as provided
    by the SMART standard for hard drives. You can use Speedfan, and watch your
    temperatures, while Prime95 is running. You don't have to use the fan control
    functions, if you are just interested in monitoring.

    To make up some numbers, current processors might be somewhere around 70C
    for throttle, and 90C for THERMTRIP. You might want to make the CPU cooling
    good enough, so that when an application like Prime95 or Orthos is running,
    the CPU temperature stays below 65C.

    There is a program called RMClock, and it has a graphic display of some
    system properties. One of the properties, is monitoring the throttle
    bit in a hardware register. Using a program like that, it is actually
    possible to see exactly when the processor starts to throttle.

    The last processor with thermal issues was the Athlon (socket 462 or socket A).
    With the early motherboards for those, if the CPU heatsink fell off, the
    processor could be cooked alive in the matter of a few seconds. At
    the point that I bought a socket 462 board, when AthlonXP processors
    were being used, my motherboard had a small eight pin chip that did
    nothing but watch the CPU internal die temperature. The chip had
    a threshold, and worked in the same fashion as THERMTRIP. Since it
    was a chip, and did not rely on BIOS or operating system code,
    it could autonomously shut off the computer. So even for
    computers of that vintage, it was possible to get protected
    ones. It was some of the early Socket 462 motherboards and processors,
    that might have been vulnerable to burnup if the heatsink fell off.

    The key message in the above description, is to do the testing with
    a 100% CPU load. Then you know how the system works under worst case
    conditions. (The only thing you're not simulating, is an elevated
    room temperature, but you can add an offset to the results to
    compensate for that. If, for example, room temp is 25C today,
    and you expect to run the computer while room temp is 35C, then
    you know your temps will shift by about 10C.)

    My CPU peaks at around 44C right now, with a room temp of 25C.
    So I'm quite far from any temperature which would cause an issue.
    (Old P4 processor running slightly above 3GHz, Northwood type.)

    With regard to sensors and labeling of displays, sometimes the
    CPU temperature and the Northbridge or motherboard sensors get
    swapped. Watching the dynamics of each temperature display
    (which temperature rises suddenly, when you start running
    Prime95), will help tell a person which sensor is which.

    Another minor issue, is motherboard heatpipe coolers, and
    computer cases like some of the ones from Lian-Li. At least
    some of the earlier motherboards, that use heatpipes to join
    the heat from Northbridge, Southbridge, and MOSFET coolers,
    don't work as well, if the motherboard is rotated 180 degrees.
    Some Lian-Li cases mount the motherboard upside-down, and
    that has been known to cause abnormally high Northbridge
    temperature readings. The solution is to try to find a
    regular computer case, that mounts the motherboard the way
    the motherboard manufacturer expected it would be used.

    HTH,
    Paul
     
  12. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Phil Weldon wrote:

    >
    > Orientation of the motherboard is only a factor when system case
    > ventilation is inadequate. I know, I know, heat rises, but the pressure
    > differential over 5 to 20 inches is very low, so passive cooling is
    > negligible compared to even the feeble 0.05 psi air flow the CPU and
    > system fans generate.
    >
    > Phil Weldon
    >


    The issue with the Lian-Li case, was noted with an Asus A8N-SLI family
    board. It seems some heatpipe coolers are more sensitive to orientation
    than others. The internal finish of the heatpipe has an effect on
    how well it works when the orientation changes from the expected one.
    Changing the computer case, to a non-Lian-Li was only one possible
    solution. This should not be interpreted as a convection cooling
    issue, because the temperature rise was more pronounced than that.

    When the internal operation of a heatpipe is thwarted, whether by
    "thermal swamping" (pushing too much power for the heatpipe design),
    a lack of operating fluid (a leak), or a change in orientation,
    all of those can have a severe impact on performance. When the
    liquid-vapor phase cooling cycle is working, that is 100 to 500 times
    more effective, than the conductivity of the copper tubing itself.
    So if the internal operation is degraded, it can lead to a significant
    change in performance.

    Paul
     
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