New CPU installed! error

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Dion Macale, Feb 7, 2006.

  1. Dion Macale

    Dion Macale Guest

    Gday all,

    this error appears when i try to boot up windows XP home, SP2

    "New CPU installed! Please enter setup
    to configure your system."

    "Press F1 to enter setup"

    "Press F2 to load default values and continue"

    the mobo is an Asus P4P800SE, and the cpu is a s478 2.4ghz northwood.

    it only happens with this particular CPU.

    i have all the correct jumper settings and the CMOS battery is fine.
    any help would be appreciated

    Thanks
    DioMac
    Dion Macale, Feb 7, 2006
    #1
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  2. Did you press F-1 to enter setup and make sure your CPU Operating
    Frequency is set correctly?
    Custom Computers, Feb 7, 2006
    #2
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  3. Dion Macale

    Paul Guest

    In article <>, "Dion
    Macale" <> wrote:

    > Gday all,
    >
    > this error appears when i try to boot up windows XP home, SP2
    >
    > "New CPU installed! Please enter setup
    > to configure your system."
    >
    > "Press F1 to enter setup"
    >
    > "Press F2 to load default values and continue"
    >
    > the mobo is an Asus P4P800SE, and the cpu is a s478 2.4ghz northwood.
    >
    > it only happens with this particular CPU.
    >
    > i have all the correct jumper settings and the CMOS battery is fine.
    > any help would be appreciated
    >
    > Thanks
    > DioMac


    I have heard of this happening before, but usually it happens with
    some obscure model of high end processor. I also haven't seen a
    post back from anyone, claiming that they fixed it. I can give you
    a little background info, which may suggest some things to try,
    but don't hold your breath in terms of a cure.

    There are several "processor recognition" issues that the
    BIOS wants to solve. The first one is the obvious one - identify
    the processor type, so that hardware settings in the processor
    and/or chipset can be applied, such that the processor will operate
    properly. Perhaps that might include enabling the L1 and L2
    cache, setting necessary frequencies (if the BSEL pins didn't do
    their thing properly) and so on.

    A second flavor of "processor recognition", is the loading of
    microcode patches. A microcode patch is a series of corrections
    to the operation of the processor, which is loaded into some
    RAM on the processor. If the processor likes the patch (patch
    has a good checksum and appears to be for that model of processor),
    it will accept an attempt to load a microcode. If no microcode
    patch works, you may see a warning on the screen, but I don't
    think there are any other consequences (except for the obvious
    one, of the processor not computing correctly). An OS like
    WinXP also has a microcode loader, and it is possible for the
    OS to load a later microcode patch, if one is stored in the OS.

    The third issue, is a bookkeeping type issue. There are areas of
    the flash, called DMI/ESCD, that the BIOS writes the current
    hardware details. A tool like Asus Probe or perhaps some earlier
    utility, would have a "DMI Explorer" tab, that can read the
    contents of what is stored in DMI/ESCD. I suspect the code that
    handles DMI/ESCD is responsible for what you are seeing.

    The way the processor might work, is when the BIOS starts to
    run, it looks to the DMI/ESCD. Say that the word "Celeron" is
    written in DMI/ESCD, and the BIOS finds "Pentium 4" in the
    motherboard socket. The BIOS will rewrite the DMI/ESCD area
    of the BIOS flash chip, with the new information, so that the
    next time the computer starts, the word "Pentium 4" is recorded
    in that bookkeeping area.

    Now, say the DMI/ESCD code recognizes that the old info is
    not equal to the new info, and yet the update of DMI/ESCD
    fails. Maybe it fails because the code cannot properly handle
    the information it is getting from the processor. Perhaps the
    attempt to flash the DMI/ESCD segment is failing altogether.

    So that suggests, the flashing the BIOS will attempt to overwrite
    the DMI/ESCD. Perhaps flashing the BIOS will be enough to
    get the BIOS to compute the DMI/ESCD properly. I cannot see
    a Northwood failing to be recognized, either from a config or
    a microcode point of view. I suppose you could use BIOS tools
    to extract the microcode and examine what patches are loaded,
    but I wouldn't really expect to see support for a 2.4GHz
    Northwood to be missing.

    I don't think clearing the CMOS will help here, as I cannot
    imagine there being enough room in the CMOS to hold anything
    that would screw up the process. But if you run out of things
    to try, I suppose it might be worth a shot. (Unplug the
    computer before following the procedure in the manual, so
    that +5VSB cannot damage anything. Some motherboard designs
    are not "+5VSB safe", and always unplugging removes the
    uncertainty about the potential for damage.)

    If you do find a solution, please post back what you find.

    HTH,
    Paul
    Paul, Feb 8, 2006
    #3
  4. Dion Macale

    Dion Macale Guest

    Hi,

    i just flashed the bios up to version 1006, as i did not want to
    install a more recent beta version, however the problem persists.

    i am not really sure where to go from here
    Dion Macale, Feb 9, 2006
    #4
  5. Dion Macale

    sdlomi2 Guest

    "Dion Macale" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > i just flashed the bios up to version 1006, as i did not want to
    > install a more recent beta version, however the problem persists.
    >
    > i am not really sure where to go from here
    >

    Have you "pressed F2 to continue" to see if it will then boot? If so,
    it will be running at minimal output due to its automatically setting
    parameters to minimal output in cmos in order to 'ensure' a boot; but it
    would at least allow you to enter cmos and attempt tweaking from that point.
    HTH & good luck, s
    sdlomi2, Feb 11, 2006
    #5
  6. Dion Macale

    Paul Guest

    In article <>, "Dion
    Macale" <> wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > i just flashed the bios up to version 1006, as i did not want to
    > install a more recent beta version, however the problem persists.
    >
    > i am not really sure where to go from here


    OK, try the following tests.

    1) Get a copy of Asus Probe. Go to support.asus.com.tw, select
    Download, type "tools" into the upper left search box. The
    returned list of tools should include Asus Probe version 22308,
    suitable for Win2k/WinXP. Install Asus Probe. You should not
    have to restart.

    There should be an Information tab, and a DMI Explorer option.
    DMI Explorer dumps the text strings stored in the DMI/ESCD.
    Click the processor item on the left hand column.
    For my 2.8GHz/FSB800/512KB Northwood, it tells me the
    family is 0F29 and there is an extended BFEBFBFF value as
    well (and I don't know right off hand what that value means).
    In any case, what we are checking here, is what the BIOS has
    managed to record and write to the DMI. The value itself
    doesn't have any value, except when we compare the output to
    the other utilities.

    There is a picture of Asus Probe here, except the processor
    item hasn't been highlighted here yet. This is what you
    see when first entering the DMI Explorer tab.

    http://www.benchmark.co.yu/tests/mainboards/asus/cubx/probe5.jpg

    2) Install the Intel Processor Identification tool.

    This tools is pretty anemic, but has one piece of information
    of interest.

    http://downloadfinder.intel.com/scripts-df-external/Product_Filter.aspx?ProductID=1881&lang=eng

    Once pidenu06.msi is installed, the tool should confirm one
    of the values above. The 0F29 family string should be
    verifiable. The other tidbit of value with this tool,
    is the "revision". The "revision" in this case, is actually
    the revision of the microcode loaded into the processor.
    The microcode is the greater of the revisions found in the
    BIOS or as delivered by the Windows microcode loader, depending
    on the version of OS. In this case, a value of 0 for the
    revision is bad, and means neither the BIOS nor the OS
    loaded microcode.

    3) The third tool is CPUZ (www.cpuid.com). There is a text
    dump option, which records all sorts of hardware info.
    CPUZ will have the 0F29 value as well. (Unfortunately,
    I don't see the "revision" recorded, so you'll have to
    get that from step 2 above.) You will also find a line
    with the string "Function 1" in the text dump and the right-most
    column will have the magic BFEBFBFF string I found in the
    DMI Explorer in step one. Again, the DMI contents for that
    eight character hex number, should match the CPUZ value
    currently being read out.

    If the tools don't have matching info, it means DMI/ESCD is
    not getting updated. If the "revision" in step 2 is 0, then
    further work will be needed on your BIOS version. (There are
    BIOS toola for extracting the microcode file, and with some
    luck, reading the revision of the microcode being used.)

    Since CPUZ is most detailed, you could post the contents from
    the text dump tool, removing whatever parts of it that seem
    pointless (like your disks or I/O ports etc).

    I know this is a lot of work, but that is "science" for you :)

    HTH,
    Paul
    Paul, Feb 11, 2006
    #6
  7. Dion Macale

    d2431 Guest

    Paul

    Thank you very much for your information. I had exact the same erro
    message and it stays even after I updated the bios to the latest.
    have a Compaq D510 Ultra Slim p4-1.6. I did step 2 of your proposa
    and found the version is 0. Can you please help me with th
    following question

    1) what can I do to load the microcode into the bios and change th
    version

    2) I have another same cpu installed on another desktop, its versio
    is 4. Can I just swap them and will it work

    Your help is greatly appreciated. Regards, Davi
    d2431, Mar 7, 2006
    #7
  8. Dion Macale

    d2431 Guest

    Paul

    Thank you very much for your information. I had exact the same erro
    message and it stays even after I updated the bios to the latest.
    have a Compaq D510 Ultra Slim p4-1.6. I did step 2 of your proposa
    and found the version is 0. Can you please help me with th
    following question

    1) what can I do to load the microcode into the bios and change th
    version

    2) I have another same cpu installed on another desktop, its versio
    is 4. Can I just swap them and will it work

    Your help is greatly appreciated. Regards, Davi
    d2431, Mar 7, 2006
    #8
  9. Dion Macale

    Paul Guest

    In article <fUnPf.10758$>, lid
    (d2431) wrote:

    > Paul,
    >
    > Thank you very much for your information.  I had exact the same error
    > message and it stays even after I updated the bios to the latest.  I
    > have a Compaq D510 Ultra Slim p4-1.6.  I did step 2 of your proposal
    > and found the version is 0.  Can you please help me with the
    > following questions
    >
    > 1) what can I do to load the microcode into the bios and change the
    > version?
    >
    > 2)  I have another same cpu installed on another desktop, its version
    > is 4.  Can I just swap them and will it work?
    >
    > Your help is greatly appreciated.  Regards,  David


    The microcode version is a reflection of the BIOS of the motherboard.
    The motherboard that returns "4" has a better BIOS than the
    Compaq that returns "0".

    If the BIOS was made by Award, you could try CTMC to fix it.
    Or, you could contact HP/Compaq tech support, and ask them
    if there is a BIOS upgrade to handle whatever processor you
    have plugged into the Compaq.

    I don't know how to take one of these apart, so I cannot
    even look at it, to determine what kind of BIOS it is.
    Sorry.

    http://h18007.www1.hp.com/support/files/evodesktop/us/download/18903.html?jumpid=reg_R1002_USEN

    The release notes for the D510, say that the 1.08 BIOS
    updated the microcode support. The 1.09 is a later
    release:

    http://h18007.www1.hp.com/support/files/evodesktop/us/revision/6254.html

    "Updates microcode patch for Intel Pentium 4 C1 processors."

    To know whether that flash ROM upgrade (1.08 or 1.09) would help,
    you need to know which of these processors you have plugged into
    the Compaq motherboard:

    http://processorfinder.intel.com/sc...e=ALL&PkgType=ALL&btnFOS=Filter on selections

    There is always a danger, that flashing the BIOS can result in
    a non-working motherboard. Badflash.com can send you a new ROM
    for $25 or so if that happens.

    Paul
    Paul, Mar 8, 2006
    #9
  10. Dion Macale

    d2431 Guest

    Thank you, Paul

    Do you think BOTH PCs will work (no error message) by swapping the cp
    from different pcs? The motherboard is made by Compaq and I do no
    know how to find the model? The bios is already updated to v.109
    686o1 rom) and still gives the error message. Can you help me to ge
    rid of this? Any info very much appreciated
    d2431, Mar 8, 2006
    #10
  11. Dion Macale

    Paul Guest

    In article <nQCPf.17160$>, lid
    (d2431) wrote:

    > Thank you, Paul,
    >
    > Do you think BOTH PCs will work (no error message) by swapping the cpu
    > from different pcs?  The motherboard is made by Compaq and I do not
    > know how to find the model?  The bios is already updated to v.109 (
    > 686o1 rom) and still gives the error message.  Can you help me to get
    > rid of this?  Any info very much appreciated.


    Remember that the BIOS is responding to the CPU used. The
    support inside the BIOS file, determines the response you
    will get.

    You have two computers. Do they use the same BIOS ? If they
    do, then moving the processor that has microcode "4" to the
    other computer, should cause the microcode version to again
    be "4" (or greater, depending on whether the Microsoft
    microcode loader is present in the OS).

    But if we are talking about different computers, the microcode
    is contained in the BIOS. The computer that gets the "4",
    has version "4" microcode in its BIOS file. It is possible
    that moving the processor from one computer to the other,
    will still give you a "0", if the Compaq BIOS has no microcode
    for that family of processor.

    I did make a slight bit of progress with the Compaq BIOS.
    I downloaded SP23361.EXE from HP. Executing it, it requests a
    floppy. The SP23361.EXE extracts files and writes them to
    the floppy. On the floppy is "ROMPAQ.EXE". In Google,
    I found the recipe "rompaq /D OCTAPU10.109 output.bin".
    That takes the OCTAPU10 input file, and decompresses it
    to output.bin. The output.bin file is 524288 bytes, which
    is 512KB and would be one of the standard sizes for a BIOS
    file.

    I opened the output.bin with a hex editor, and unfortunately,
    the BIOS appears to be proprietary, and is not an Award/AMI/Phoenix.
    There is boot block code at the end of the file, in roughly
    the same place as a standard BIOS, but the "branding" inside
    the file only mentions Compaq.

    Whether the CTMC program can add microcode to the BIOS,
    really depends on whether the Intel specified BIOS hook
    has been coded in the BIOS. My experience is, an Award BIOS
    has the hook code, and AMI doesn't. At least CTMC complains
    if I try to use CTMC on an AMI BIOS. Now, what are the
    odds that Compaq's proprietary BIOS implements the Intel
    BIOS hook, and does it the same way as Award ? Probably
    pretty slim odds.

    So, you can Google for CTMC... CTMC won't hurt anything, so
    should be safe to experiment with. You need a donor BIOS to
    get a 2KB microcode file from, and the microcode has to be
    for the exact family code of the processor you are working with.
    The Intel identification utility can probably give you the
    family code of your existing processor. Then you need to
    find an Award BIOS from the right "era", to find the microcode
    in question and extract it. Have fun :)

    http://groups.google.ca/group/alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus/msg/4441ec476f864e9b?dmode=source

    Paul
    Paul, Mar 8, 2006
    #11
  12. Dion Macale

    d2431 Guest

    Parul, thank you very much for your time and help

    Is that possible for you to list step by step how to fix this? I kno
    I might ask for too much, but as you know I know little abou
    'programming'. I believe following the right procedures I can fi
    it. Thanks again
    d2431, Mar 9, 2006
    #12
  13. Dion Macale

    alex_nrv

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Problem solved, 1 year later!

    Hi everyone.
    This thread is out dated, I know, but I was searching help on Google, and the only sites I got were ones like this one, with old threads!
    But it doesn't matter...
    I'll leave a bit of info, cuz if I DID fell on this thread while googling, somebody else will do... so I'd like to share the way I fixed the problem, since nobody looks to have solved the problem on this forum!!

    Here it is...
    I tried several things, like flashing the BIOS to older and more recent versions, it DOESN'T WORK!
    Then I tried changing the battery... DOESN'T WORK neither!
    So... after several tests, I got to the power supply and noticed that the +3.3V (used by the CPU) was slightly LOW... (+2.84V)... so I hooked a new power supply on the computer and EVERYTHING WAS SOLVED!!

    So I hope this will help people... CHANGING the power supply might be really helpful!
    alex_nrv, Sep 27, 2007
    #13
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