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Non-marring tool for opening/repairing laptop

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by mACKnIFE, Apr 28, 2004.

  1. mACKnIFE

    mACKnIFE Guest

    Hi,

    In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
    pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
    that tool on the internet but I can't find it. At some newsgroups I
    saw that some people refer to this tool as a "wedge".

    I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?

    It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being made of
    steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't hurt the plastic
    parts of the laptop.

    Thanks!
     
    mACKnIFE, Apr 28, 2004
    #1
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  2. > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic
    > scribe" to pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop.
    > I've searched for that tool on the internet but I can't find it.
    > At some newsgroups I saw that some people refer to this
    > tool as a "wedge".
    >
    > I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?
    >
    > It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being
    > made of steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't
    > hurt the plastic parts of the laptop.


    Depending on the piece you are removing, you might try the toothpick from a
    Swiss Army knife. It has a flat point that slides under plastic covers
    nicely, and it's a soft plastic that is unlikely to damage anything. It
    doesn't have much strength and won't pry up a cover that is more securely
    attached, but it works well for a lot of things.

    You may already have one of these, or any store that sells Swiss Army knives
    will have them as replacement parts.

    -Mike
     
    Michael Geary, Apr 28, 2004
    #2
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  3. mACKnIFE

    bobchang Guest

    Them good old finger nails are probably just as good when you're trying to
    part those plastic panels held together by numerous snaps - such panels
    are most commonly found surrounding the LCD display - and yes, a toothpick
    would be helpful to keep the already parted snaps from snapping close.


    If you're using tools, please note that even plastic tools can cause
    scratch marks or dent/pry marks (plastic versus plastic is an even fight).
     
    bobchang, Apr 28, 2004
    #3
  4. mACKnIFE wrote:
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
    > pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
    > that tool on the internet but I can't find it. At some newsgroups I
    > saw that some people refer to this tool as a "wedge".
    >
    > I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?
    >
    > It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being made of
    > steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't hurt the plastic
    > parts of the laptop.


    You might try a plastic putty knife.

    Larry
     
    Lawrence Glasser, Apr 28, 2004
    #4
  5. mACKnIFE

    David Lee Guest

    Try using the clip on the cap of a basic cheapo Bic ballpoint pen - trim it
    to size if necessary.

    David

    "mACKnIFE" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
    > pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for
    > that tool on the internet but I can't find it. At some newsgroups I
    > saw that some people refer to this tool as a "wedge".
    >
    > I'd like to know if anybody knows where to buy that tool?
    >
    > It looks like a flathead screwdriver but instead of being made of
    > steel, it's made of plastic. That way it doesn't hurt the plastic
    > parts of the laptop.
    >
    > Thanks!
     
    David Lee, Apr 29, 2004
    #5
  6. mACKnIFE

    bobchang Guest

    That's the best idea I've heard so far...
     
    bobchang, Apr 29, 2004
    #6
  7. > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
    > pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for


    A set of coil tuning tools will include one device like this - a
    plastic screwdriver. Usually one end is a hex driver and the other is
    a flathead screwdriver, for adjusting inductors.
     
    Lewin A.R.W. Edwards, Apr 29, 2004
    #7
  8. mACKnIFE

    mACKnIFE Guest

    Hehehe!

    This is funny! You guys are very resourceful! And I thought I was the
    only one in the boat with this one, not finding where to buy that damn
    plastic screwdriver! :)

    Thanks guys!


    (Lewin A.R.W. Edwards) wrote in message news:<>...
    > > In Dell documentation they refer to a "nonmarring plastic scribe" to
    > > pry up some plastic covers or parts in a laptop. I've searched for

    >
    > A set of coil tuning tools will include one device like this - a
    > plastic screwdriver. Usually one end is a hex driver and the other is
    > a flathead screwdriver, for adjusting inductors.
     
    mACKnIFE, May 28, 2004
    #8
  9. mACKnIFE

    charlescott Guest

    I encountered the same problem taking my Dell Inspiron XPS apart to
    replace a defective video card and found the perfect solution at
    www.specialized.net . If you look under "Hand Tools" and
    then under "Adjusting Tools", you'll find a five piece alignment
    toolkit (stock#054X700) for $6.50 and a GC Thorsen, alignment tool
    (stock#318X805) for $1.25. Shipping is about $10 so you might as
    well buy both as I did. So for a little under $18 you'll have a very
    handy set of tools for working on your laptop without scratching it
    up. They've got some other handy tools as well...I also found a
    keyboard key puller for $5.00. Enjoy! :D

    ==============
    Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.
     
    charlescott, Jun 17, 2004
    #9
  10. mACKnIFE

    anjl54

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Plastic Scribe - Easy Answer

    I found that the plastic scribe is also called an "Orange Stick" in the Jonar Alignment Toolkit mentioned in another quote. As a woman, I have manicure items - one of which is a plastic orange stick that was included in a small manicure set. It fits the cutout slot on my Dell, as well as the unit I am repairing, perfectly. I also found that a regular wooden orange stick fits perfectly. So, rather than spending even $18 for a $7 kit (the price went up from the previous poster and that includes the $10 shipping), you can go to Walmart, Target, CVS, Walgreens, or ANY beauty supply, major pharmacy, or even the Dollar Store and pick up a pack of wooden orange sticks (about $1.29) or set of plastic manicure tools for under $5. If you need one of the tiny hooks in the set, you can pick up a tiny plastic crochet hook for which should do the job that the Jonar alignment tool was designed for about the same price.

    Just a thought.

    Angie



     
    anjl54, Feb 23, 2011
    #10
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