Opening of the Apple keyboards

Discussion in 'Apple' started by JF Mezei, May 11, 2012.

  1. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest

    I have a wired Apple keyboard (with numeric keypad).


    It is time for it to get a good clean. In the past, I would take
    keyboard apart, wash the keycaps in dish water, dry them out and
    re-assemble the keyboard. (with the dust, hair etc inside removed).

    I looked at ifixit and couldn't find instructions on how to open the
    keyboard.

    Anyone have hints ? Are there screws under the difficult to remove
    rubber feet ? Or is this a "snap in" type of arrangement or is the
    thing glewed solid and I need to be prepared to buy a new one if
    cleaning the keycaps in site caused keyboard to fail ?


    (it needs a "real" cleanup, not a superfial one like I do often).
    JF Mezei, May 11, 2012
    #1
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  2. In article <>, Jolly
    Roger <> wrote:
    > In article <4fad81da$0$6839$c3e8da3$>,
    > JF Mezei <> wrote:
    > >
    > > I have a wired Apple keyboard (with numeric keypad).
    > >
    > > It is time for it to get a good clean. In the past, I would take
    > > keyboard apart, wash the keycaps in dish water, dry them out and
    > > re-assemble the keyboard. (with the dust, hair etc inside removed).
    > >
    > > I looked at ifixit and couldn't find instructions on how to open the
    > > keyboard.
    > >
    > > Anyone have hints ? Are there screws under the difficult to remove
    > > rubber feet ? Or is this a "snap in" type of arrangement or is the
    > > thing glewed solid and I need to be prepared to buy a new one if
    > > cleaning the keycaps in site caused keyboard to fail ?
    > >
    > >
    > > (it needs a "real" cleanup, not a superfial one like I do often).

    >
    > The keyboard is glued together. I doubt very much that you could open it
    > without bending it out of shape.
    >
    > You can remove the keys and clean underneath them.


    Technically they can be removed. I haven't tried removing keys from one of
    Apple's aluminium keyboards yet, but they are basically laptop keyboards,
    and unlike "normal" desktop keys, the hinging mechanism for laptop keys
    can be fairly easily broken when removing them. :eek:(

    On the bonus side, since the aluminium keyboard is flat and almost sealed,
    not as much dirt can get in as does with "normal" desktop keyboards.

    Helpful Harry :eek:)
    Helpful Harry, May 12, 2012
    #2
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  3. JF Mezei

    TaliesinSoft Guest

    Years ago I had the misfortune of spilling a glass of beer into an
    Apple keyboard. I plunged the keyboard into a bathtub of water and
    sloshed it around for quite a while. I then placed the keyboard into an
    oven which I set on a low heat and let it stay in there for two days.
    After that the keyboard worked just fine! This was before the aluminum
    keyboards appeared and I have no idea if the same treatment would work.
    TaliesinSoft, May 12, 2012
    #3
  4. JF Mezei

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    TaliesinSoft <> wrote:

    > Years ago I had the misfortune of spilling a glass of beer into an
    > Apple keyboard. I plunged the keyboard into a bathtub of water and
    > sloshed it around for quite a while. I then placed the keyboard into an
    > oven which I set on a low heat and let it stay in there for two days.
    > After that the keyboard worked just fine! This was before the aluminum
    > keyboards appeared and I have no idea if the same treatment would work.


    Someone should bring out a book on cleaning keyboards, there have been
    so many tales around. For some odd reason the one that has stuck in my
    mind is the one about putting it in the dishwasher and it being fine
    afterwards or almost fine, just one key not working.

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, May 12, 2012
    #4
  5. JF Mezei

    Peter James Guest

    JF Mezei <> wrote:

    > I have a wired Apple keyboard (with numeric keypad).
    >
    >
    > It is time for it to get a good clean. In the past, I would take
    > keyboard apart, wash the keycaps in dish water, dry them out and
    > re-assemble the keyboard. (with the dust, hair etc inside removed).
    >
    > I looked at ifixit and couldn't find instructions on how to open the
    > keyboard.
    >
    > Anyone have hints ? Are there screws under the difficult to remove
    > rubber feet ? Or is this a "snap in" type of arrangement or is the
    > thing glewed solid and I need to be prepared to buy a new one if
    > cleaning the keycaps in site caused keyboard to fail ?
    >
    >
    > (it needs a "real" cleanup, not a superfial one like I do often).


    I have two of the wired type keyboards. One in use, and one "resting"
    after a clean.
    I just run the hot water tap over the keyboard, ensuring that all
    particles of food, i.e biscuit and cake crumbs are washed away and all
    coffee stains and sugar are dissolved away. I give it as good a drying
    I can give it with a soft towel, and then place it on the draining board
    to drain. I then put it in the airing cupboard for until such time as
    the keyboard in use needs cleaning.

    I have done this for four years now, and the KB works perfectly after
    every clean.

    Peter
    --
    It is necessary for the good man to do nothing for evil to triumph.

    Attributed to Edmund Burke 1729 - 1797
    Peter James, May 12, 2012
    #5
  6. JF Mezei

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2012-05-11 17:17 , JF Mezei wrote:
    > I have a wired Apple keyboard (with numeric keypad).
    >
    >
    > It is time for it to get a good clean. In the past, I would take
    > keyboard apart, wash the keycaps in dish water, dry them out and
    > re-assemble the keyboard. (with the dust, hair etc inside removed).
    >
    > I looked at ifixit and couldn't find instructions on how to open the
    > keyboard.
    >
    > Anyone have hints ? Are there screws under the difficult to remove
    > rubber feet ? Or is this a "snap in" type of arrangement or is the
    > thing glewed solid and I need to be prepared to buy a new one if
    > cleaning the keycaps in site caused keyboard to fail ?
    >
    >
    > (it needs a "real" cleanup, not a superfial one like I do often).


    If you mean the metal one with square, flat keys I'll give you mine if
    you donate $10 to charity.

    It's near pristine.

    --
    "A person with a new idea is a crank until the idea succeeds."
    -Samuel Clemens.
    Alan Browne, May 12, 2012
    #6
  7. JF Mezei

    George Kerby Guest

    On 5/11/12 11:14 PM, in article ,
    "TaliesinSoft" <> wrote:

    > Years ago I had the misfortune of spilling a glass of beer into an
    > Apple keyboard. I plunged the keyboard into a bathtub of water and
    > sloshed it around for quite a while. I then placed the keyboard into an
    > oven which I set on a low heat and let it stay in there for two days.
    > After that the keyboard worked just fine! This was before the aluminum
    > keyboards appeared and I have no idea if the same treatment would work.
    >


    <http://www.iskin.com/protouch_apple_keyboard/>
    George Kerby, May 12, 2012
    #7
  8. JF Mezei

    Paul Sture Guest

    On Sat, 12 May 2012 15:54:34 +1000, dorayme wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > TaliesinSoft <> wrote:
    >
    >> Years ago I had the misfortune of spilling a glass of beer into an
    >> Apple keyboard. I plunged the keyboard into a bathtub of water and
    >> sloshed it around for quite a while. I then placed the keyboard into an
    >> oven which I set on a low heat and let it stay in there for two days.
    >> After that the keyboard worked just fine! This was before the aluminum
    >> keyboards appeared and I have no idea if the same treatment would work.

    >
    > Someone should bring out a book on cleaning keyboards, there have been
    > so many tales around. For some odd reason the one that has stuck in my
    > mind is the one about putting it in the dishwasher and it being fine
    > afterwards or almost fine, just one key not working.


    I tried that once. Result: too many keys didn't work.

    I had a lot more success with a DEC keyboard. I took all the keycaps off
    and put them in the dishwasher.

    Hint: take a photo of the keyboard before you take the keycaps off. This
    takes any guesswork away when reassembling it.



    --
    Paul Sture
    Paul Sture, May 12, 2012
    #8
  9. JF Mezei

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>, Paul Sture <>
    wrote:

    > Hint: take a photo of the keyboard before you take the keycaps off. This
    > takes any guesswork away when reassembling it.


    Another hint:

    1. Loosen all keys but leave them in place.

    2. Have a breadboard at least as big as the keyboard.

    3. Chew some gum, and when well masticated, dob a bit on each key. Or,
    if you actually like gum, chew a lot and smear it all over the board.

    4. Place board on top of keyboard and press gently, just enough to get
    the gum to stick and no more. Lift board gently and store upside down
    in a safe place. Wash keyboard. Then, when dry, gently reverse the
    bread board onto the keyboard. Use extra marker lines if need be.

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, May 13, 2012
    #9
  10. JF Mezei

    Paul Sture Guest

    On Sun, 13 May 2012 09:50:48 +1000, dorayme wrote:

    > In article <>, Paul Sture <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Hint: take a photo of the keyboard before you take the keycaps off.
    >> This takes any guesswork away when reassembling it.

    >
    > Another hint:
    >
    > 1. Loosen all keys but leave them in place.
    >
    > 2. Have a breadboard at least as big as the keyboard.
    >
    > 3. Chew some gum, and when well masticated, dob a bit on each key. Or,
    > if you actually like gum, chew a lot and smear it all over the board.
    >
    > 4. Place board on top of keyboard and press gently, just enough to get
    > the gum to stick and no more. Lift board gently and store upside down in
    > a safe place. Wash keyboard. Then, when dry, gently reverse the bread
    > board onto the keyboard. Use extra marker lines if need be.


    A sheet of sticky backed plastic sounds less messy.



    --
    Paul Sture
    Paul Sture, May 13, 2012
    #10
  11. JF Mezei

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>, Paul Sture <>
    wrote:

    > On Sun, 13 May 2012 09:50:48 +1000, dorayme wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>, Paul Sture <>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> Hint: take a photo of the keyboard before you take the keycaps off.
    > >> This takes any guesswork away when reassembling it.

    > >
    > > Another hint:
    > >
    > > 1. Loosen all keys but leave them in place.
    > >
    > > 2. Have a breadboard at least as big as the keyboard.
    > >
    > > 3. Chew some gum, and when well masticated, dob a bit on each key. Or,
    > > if you actually like gum, chew a lot and smear it all over the board.
    > >
    > > 4. Place board on top of keyboard and press gently, just enough to get
    > > the gum to stick and no more. Lift board gently and store upside down in
    > > a safe place. Wash keyboard. Then, when dry, gently reverse the bread
    > > board onto the keyboard. Use extra marker lines if need be.

    >
    > A sheet of sticky backed plastic sounds less messy.


    Well, yes of course, but then what are you going to do with gum you
    have chewed enough?

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, May 13, 2012
    #11
  12. In article <>,
    dorayme <> wrote:

    > In article <>, Paul Sture <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > On Sun, 13 May 2012 09:50:48 +1000, dorayme wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <>, Paul Sture <>
    > > > wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> Hint: take a photo of the keyboard before you take the keycaps off.
    > > >> This takes any guesswork away when reassembling it.
    > > >
    > > > Another hint:
    > > >
    > > > 1. Loosen all keys but leave them in place.
    > > >
    > > > 2. Have a breadboard at least as big as the keyboard.
    > > >
    > > > 3. Chew some gum, and when well masticated, dob a bit on each key. Or,
    > > > if you actually like gum, chew a lot and smear it all over the board.
    > > >
    > > > 4. Place board on top of keyboard and press gently, just enough to get
    > > > the gum to stick and no more. Lift board gently and store upside down in
    > > > a safe place. Wash keyboard. Then, when dry, gently reverse the bread
    > > > board onto the keyboard. Use extra marker lines if need be.

    > >
    > > A sheet of sticky backed plastic sounds less messy.

    >
    > Well, yes of course, but then what are you going to do with gum you
    > have chewed enough?


    Find an elementary school desk on which to stick it. Duh!
    --
    Remove blown from email address to reply.
    Thomas R. Kettler, May 13, 2012
    #12
  13. JF Mezei

    dorayme Guest

    In article
    <-september.org>,
    "Thomas R. Kettler" <> wrote:

    > > > A sheet of sticky backed plastic sounds less messy.

    > >
    > > Well, yes of course, but then what are you going to do with gum you
    > > have chewed enough?

    >
    > Find an elementary school desk on which to stick it. Duh!


    It was not much of a habit in my schooldays, and it must be 40 years
    since I ever tried it. It's more an American habit I think. I went
    into a very short phase of bubble gum, there was a point to it, you
    could blow bubbles and it required some skill. Funny, I can still
    remember the flavour of it... how to describe? Sweet floral taste? I
    dunno. A friend asked me the other night, what does bamia (okra) taste
    like and I said it was sui generis (I can use phrases like this and
    not seem in my own eyes pretentious because I did a lot of Latin for
    many years), it was not really like anything else in flavour. I don't
    think... I grew some this last summer.

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, May 13, 2012
    #13
  14. JF Mezei

    Paul Sture Guest

    On Sun, 13 May 2012 12:32:17 +1000, dorayme wrote:

    > In article <>, Paul Sture <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 13 May 2012 09:50:48 +1000, dorayme wrote:
    >>
    >> > In article <>, Paul Sture <>
    >> > wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Hint: take a photo of the keyboard before you take the keycaps off.
    >> >> This takes any guesswork away when reassembling it.
    >> >
    >> > Another hint:
    >> >
    >> > 1. Loosen all keys but leave them in place.
    >> >
    >> > 2. Have a breadboard at least as big as the keyboard.
    >> >
    >> > 3. Chew some gum, and when well masticated, dob a bit on each key.
    >> > Or, if you actually like gum, chew a lot and smear it all over the
    >> > board.
    >> >
    >> > 4. Place board on top of keyboard and press gently, just enough to
    >> > get the gum to stick and no more. Lift board gently and store upside
    >> > down in a safe place. Wash keyboard. Then, when dry, gently reverse
    >> > the bread board onto the keyboard. Use extra marker lines if need be.

    >>
    >> A sheet of sticky backed plastic sounds less messy.

    >
    > Well, yes of course, but then what are you going to do with gum you have
    > chewed enough?


    Don't use the stuff myself.

    It's a filthy habit (well, the way most people dispose of the stuff
    is). ;-)



    --
    Paul Sture
    Paul Sture, May 13, 2012
    #14
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