1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

OT: Best New Laser Printer to Buy

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by David T. Ashley, Dec 31, 2006.

  1. What is the best new laser printer to buy (for tecchie home use)?

    My story: I bought an HP LaserJet 4 in approximately 1992 and put it to
    medium-volume use. After about 8 years, it started having paper feed
    problems. I applied some roller renewing chemical to the rubber rollers,
    which lasted about a year before the paper feed problems reappeared. Then,
    I ordered a kit of new rollers for $49.00 from a place online--it required a
    bit of surgery to get them all installed, but now the printer is going
    strong for several years now with new rollers.

    I've noticed that the LaserJet 4 parts chain is still going strong, and I
    can at this point order anything I want. But sooner or later, something
    will break and the parts chain will dry up.

    Is HP making any decent "workhorse" printers these days? Shamefully, I'm
    looking for something that will last me another 15 years after I buy it.

    Constraints for me:

    a)High volume toner cartridges (I need several thousand sheets of paper
    between changes). (No inkjet or other technologies that are a hassle.)

    b)Must work with LaTeX, GhostScript, and other serious tecchie applications.

    c)Would be nice if it were directly connectable to an Ethernet network (so I
    don't need to turn my big computer on to share the printer with my laptop).

    d)Color not required an in fact not really desired.

    HP is turning out so many printers these days ... it is hard for me to
    differentiate the workhorses from ones that aren't as well built.

    Thanks for any input.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    David T. Ashley ()
    http://www.e3ft.com (Consulting Home Page)
    http://www.dtashley.com (Personal Home Page)
    http://gpl.e3ft.com (GPL Publications and Projects)
    David T. Ashley, Dec 31, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. David T. Ashley

    Craig Ruff Guest

    In article <>,
    David T. Ashley <> wrote:
    >What is the best new laser printer to buy (for tecchie home use)?
    >...


    The LaserJet 1200n would appear to meet your criteria, but I don't know
    if they still sell them. I've printed documentation with manual double
    sided printing, and my wife, who is a graphics designer ran quite a bit
    of stuff through it while she was in school. The Ethernet connection
    is a additional small Ethernet-USB brick, but it works well. We get
    3000+ pages from a cartridge, supposedly up to 20 ppm. We use it from
    both Linux and Mac OS X.
    Craig Ruff, Dec 31, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. David T. Ashley

    Guest

    Re: OT: Best New Laser Printer to Buy

    David T. Ashley wrote:
    > What is the best new laser printer to buy (for tecchie home use)?
    >
    > My story: I bought an HP LaserJet 4 in approximately 1992 and put it to
    > medium-volume use. After about 8 years, it started having paper feed
    > problems. I applied some roller renewing chemical to the rubber rollers,
    > which lasted about a year before the paper feed problems reappeared. Then,
    > I ordered a kit of new rollers for $49.00 from a place online--it required a
    > bit of surgery to get them all installed, but now the printer is going
    > strong for several years now with new rollers.
    >
    > I've noticed that the LaserJet 4 parts chain is still going strong, and I
    > can at this point order anything I want. But sooner or later, something
    > will break and the parts chain will dry up.
    >
    > Is HP making any decent "workhorse" printers these days? Shamefully, I'm
    > looking for something that will last me another 15 years after I buy it.


    Yes, but HP is like everything else out of idiot silicon valley
    anymore,
    It's not a question of whether they will work in five years,
    it's a question of whether Wal-Mart is going to
    sell them in 5 years.




    > Constraints for me:
    >
    > a)High volume toner cartridges (I need several thousand sheets of paper
    > between changes). (No inkjet or other technologies that are a hassle.)
    >
    > b)Must work with LaTeX, GhostScript, and other serious tecchie applications.
    >
    > c)Would be nice if it were directly connectable to an Ethernet network (so I
    > don't need to turn my big computer on to share the printer with my laptop).
    >
    > d)Color not required an in fact not really desired.
    >
    > HP is turning out so many printers these days ... it is hard for me to
    > differentiate the workhorses from ones that aren't as well built.
    >
    > Thanks for any input.
    > ------------------------------------------------------------
    > David T. Ashley ()
    > http://www.e3ft.com (Consulting Home Page)
    > http://www.dtashley.com (Personal Home Page)
    > http://gpl.e3ft.com (GPL Publications and Projects)
    , Dec 31, 2006
    #3
  4. David T. Ashley

    CBFalconer Guest

    Craig Ruff wrote:
    > David T. Ashley <> wrote:
    >
    >> What is the best new laser printer to buy (for tecchie home use)?
    >> ...

    >
    > The LaserJet 1200n would appear to meet your criteria, but I don't
    > know if they still sell them. I've printed documentation with
    > manual double sided printing, and my wife, who is a graphics
    > designer ran quite a bit of stuff through it while she was in
    > school. The Ethernet connection is a additional small Ethernet-USB
    > brick, but it works well. We get 3000+ pages from a cartridge,
    > supposedly up to 20 ppm. We use it from both Linux and Mac OS X.


    About 2000 I bought a Samsung ML 4500 for USD 199. It's still
    going strong, and on its second cartridge (the first was the
    original underfilled one). I estimate that it has processed about
    a box of paper. For two sided printing you have to be careful,
    especially let the paper cool before refeeding it. I interpose the
    fineprint (fineprint.com) module, so I can make arbitrary booklets,
    paper sizes, etc.

    --
    Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukah, Happy New Year
    Joyeux Noel, Bonne Annee.
    Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>
    CBFalconer, Dec 31, 2006
    #4
  5. David T. Ashley wrote:
    > What is the best new laser printer to buy (for tecchie home use)?
    >
    > My story: I bought an HP LaserJet 4 in approximately 1992 and put it to
    > medium-volume use. After about 8 years, it started having paper feed
    > problems. I applied some roller renewing chemical to the rubber rollers,
    > which lasted about a year before the paper feed problems reappeared. Then,
    > I ordered a kit of new rollers for $49.00 from a place online--it required a
    > bit of surgery to get them all installed, but now the printer is going
    > strong for several years now with new rollers.
    >
    > I've noticed that the LaserJet 4 parts chain is still going strong, and I
    > can at this point order anything I want. But sooner or later, something
    > will break and the parts chain will dry up.
    >
    > Is HP making any decent "workhorse" printers these days? Shamefully, I'm
    > looking for something that will last me another 15 years after I buy it.
    >
    > Constraints for me:
    >
    > a)High volume toner cartridges (I need several thousand sheets of paper
    > between changes). (No inkjet or other technologies that are a hassle.)
    >
    > b)Must work with LaTeX, GhostScript, and other serious tecchie applications.
    >
    > c)Would be nice if it were directly connectable to an Ethernet network (so I
    > don't need to turn my big computer on to share the printer with my laptop).


    Hello,

    I bought a HP Laserjet 1320 about 1 1/2 half year ago and in fact it was
    the best buy I every made. I supports postscript and therefore is an
    excellent choice for Unix operating systems. The windows drivers are
    also great and I have also used them for advanced technical drawings
    (autocad, ...). Regarding the cartridges I am very happy with it but
    have to admit that I did not count the number of pages I have printed.

    I have not tried the 1320TN series but they should be network ready and
    therefore should be a good choice. Maybe you can get one on Ebay because
    I think they have been EOLd by HP.

    > d)Color not required an in fact not really desired.
    >
    > HP is turning out so many printers these days ... it is hard for me to
    > differentiate the workhorses from ones that aren't as well built.


    Kind regards,
    Christian

    PS: I had the same problems with a Laserjet 1100 and the reason for the
    printing problems where some manufacturing errors from HP. Sadly I
    missed the time frame when the replacement parts where available and so
    I had to buy a new one.

    >
    > Thanks for any input.
    > ------------------------------------------------------------
    > David T. Ashley ()
    > http://www.e3ft.com (Consulting Home Page)
    > http://www.dtashley.com (Personal Home Page)
    > http://gpl.e3ft.com (GPL Publications and Projects)
    >
    >
    Christian Walter, Dec 31, 2006
    #5
  6. David T. Ashley

    Joerg Guest

    Hello David,

    I went to a Brother Multi Function Center (MFC7820N) that is hooked to
    the LAN. Works great so far but manual double sided printing would be a
    pain. Also, it "forgets" its IP address once in a while but a power
    cycle fixes this. I really like printers on the LAN since they can be
    accessed by anyone.

    Ask Jim Thompson on sci.electronics.design. He bought an HP workhorse
    that can do automatic double-sided printing and is reasonable in toner
    costs. Probably more reasonable than the Brother I have here. IIRC Jim
    bought the HP1320.

    --
    Regards, Joerg

    http://www.analogconsultants.com
    Joerg, Dec 31, 2006
    #6
  7. David T. Ashley

    Joerg Guest

    Christian Walter wrote:

    > David T. Ashley wrote:
    >
    >> What is the best new laser printer to buy (for tecchie home use)?
    >>
    >> My story: I bought an HP LaserJet 4 in approximately 1992 and put it
    >> to medium-volume use. After about 8 years, it started having paper
    >> feed problems. I applied some roller renewing chemical to the rubber
    >> rollers, which lasted about a year before the paper feed problems
    >> reappeared. Then, I ordered a kit of new rollers for $49.00 from a
    >> place online--it required a bit of surgery to get them all installed,
    >> but now the printer is going strong for several years now with new
    >> rollers.
    >>
    >> I've noticed that the LaserJet 4 parts chain is still going strong,
    >> and I can at this point order anything I want. But sooner or later,
    >> something will break and the parts chain will dry up.
    >>
    >> Is HP making any decent "workhorse" printers these days? Shamefully,
    >> I'm looking for something that will last me another 15 years after I
    >> buy it.
    >>
    >> Constraints for me:
    >>
    >> a)High volume toner cartridges (I need several thousand sheets of
    >> paper between changes). (No inkjet or other technologies that are a
    >> hassle.)
    >>
    >> b)Must work with LaTeX, GhostScript, and other serious tecchie
    >> applications.
    >>
    >> c)Would be nice if it were directly connectable to an Ethernet network
    >> (so I don't need to turn my big computer on to share the printer with
    >> my laptop).

    >
    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > I bought a HP Laserjet 1320 about 1 1/2 half year ago and in fact it was
    > the best buy I every made. I supports postscript and therefore is an
    > excellent choice for Unix operating systems. The windows drivers are
    > also great and I have also used them for advanced technical drawings
    > (autocad, ...). Regarding the cartridges I am very happy with it but
    > have to admit that I did not count the number of pages I have printed.
    >
    > I have not tried the 1320TN series but they should be network ready and
    > therefore should be a good choice. Maybe you can get one on Ebay because
    > I think they have been EOLd by HP.
    >
    >> d)Color not required an in fact not really desired.
    >>
    >> HP is turning out so many printers these days ... it is hard for me to
    >> differentiate the workhorses from ones that aren't as well built.

    >
    >
    > Kind regards,
    > Christian
    >
    > PS: I had the same problems with a Laserjet 1100 and the reason for the
    > printing problems where some manufacturing errors from HP. Sadly I
    > missed the time frame when the replacement parts where available and so
    > I had to buy a new one.
    >


    For the HP5L out here I got the improvement kit. IIRC it was some kind
    of drying or aging of a part at the bottom of the paper stack (not any
    rollers). At least that's where the new part had to be glued onto via a
    hard cardboard push. The main problem with those printers was that they
    pulled in several sheets without that fix and this caused the jams in my
    case.

    --
    Regards, Joerg

    http://www.analogconsultants.com
    Joerg, Dec 31, 2006
    #7
  8. "Christian Walter" <> wrote in message
    news:newscache$42a4bj$oe2$...
    >
    > PS: I had the same problems with a Laserjet 1100 and the reason for the
    > printing problems where some manufacturing errors from HP. Sadly I missed
    > the time frame when the replacement parts where available and so I had to
    > buy a new one.


    Yeah, that's my concern exactly. The problem is, I want to pick a workhorse
    where parts will be available for 15 years.

    Frankly, my LJ4 is just fine and I'd keep it forever if that were possible.
    It doesn't print as fast as a more modern printer (its little 1992 CPU
    probably can't work as fast as the new ones), but it is just fine.

    And the "just fine" argument could be made if I find a replacement
    workhorse. I can't imagine that printers in 15 years will be better than
    they are today in any meaningful way. Once you add color and if it sits
    directly on a network ... what else could you do to add value? (nothing
    that I can see).

    Problem is knowing production volumes, meaningful measures of quality, and
    what the parts chain will do. I don't know how to predict that.

    P.S.--According to www.printerworks.com, there are still some parts
    available for the 1100 series. The chain looks fairly complete.

    For example:

    http://www.printerworks.com/Catalogs/1100-Catalog/110_1100InternalComponent.html

    Dave.
    David T. Ashley, Dec 31, 2006
    #8
  9. David T. Ashley wrote:
    > What is the best new laser printer to buy (for tecchie home use)?
    >
    > My story: I bought an HP LaserJet 4 in approximately 1992 and put it to
    > medium-volume use. After about 8 years, it started having paper feed
    > problems. I applied some roller renewing chemical to the rubber rollers,
    > which lasted about a year before the paper feed problems reappeared. Then,
    > I ordered a kit of new rollers for $49.00 from a place online--it required a
    > bit of surgery to get them all installed, but now the printer is going
    > strong for several years now with new rollers.
    >
    > I've noticed that the LaserJet 4 parts chain is still going strong, and I
    > can at this point order anything I want. But sooner or later, something
    > will break and the parts chain will dry up.
    >
    > Is HP making any decent "workhorse" printers these days? Shamefully, I'm
    > looking for something that will last me another 15 years after I buy it.
    >
    > Constraints for me:
    >
    > a)High volume toner cartridges (I need several thousand sheets of paper
    > between changes). (No inkjet or other technologies that are a hassle.)
    >
    > b)Must work with LaTeX, GhostScript, and other serious tecchie applications.
    >
    > c)Would be nice if it were directly connectable to an Ethernet network (so I
    > don't need to turn my big computer on to share the printer with my laptop).
    >
    > d)Color not required an in fact not really desired.
    >
    > HP is turning out so many printers these days ... it is hard for me to
    > differentiate the workhorses from ones that aren't as well built.
    >
    > Thanks for any input.
    > ------------------------------------------------------------
    > David T. Ashley ()
    > http://www.e3ft.com (Consulting Home Page)
    > http://www.dtashley.com (Personal Home Page)
    > http://gpl.e3ft.com (GPL Publications and Projects)


    I have had such good experiences with HP printers that I don't bother
    look anywhere else these days. Even the non-workhorse printers (cheapo
    inkjets etc) are well built. So my feeling is that if the HP website
    advertises a printer as a workhorse, then it is really a workhorse.

    I just got a new Laserjet 1320d at my workplace. I haven't had it long,
    so it is hard to really comment on its longevity, but so far it looks
    really nice.

    And even my super cheapo HP inkjet at home has no problem with Latex,
    ghostscript, etc. So that isn't even an issue.

    Finally, if you are using unix, the HP drivers, like hpijs, are really
    outstanding. You really don't need a printer that has postscript
    natively built in. Just make sure that it is not "windows only."
    Stephen Montgomery-Smith, Dec 31, 2006
    #9
  10. In article <D9Glh.333222$1i1.238690@attbi_s72>,
    says...
    > David T. Ashley wrote:
    > > What is the best new laser printer to buy (for tecchie home use)?
    > >
    > > My story: I bought an HP LaserJet 4 in approximately 1992 and put it to
    > > medium-volume use. After about 8 years, it started having paper feed
    > > problems. I applied some roller renewing chemical to the rubber rollers,
    > > which lasted about a year before the paper feed problems reappeared. Then,
    > > I ordered a kit of new rollers for $49.00 from a place online--it required a
    > > bit of surgery to get them all installed, but now the printer is going
    > > strong for several years now with new rollers.
    > >
    > > I've noticed that the LaserJet 4 parts chain is still going strong, and I
    > > can at this point order anything I want. But sooner or later, something
    > > will break and the parts chain will dry up.
    > >
    > > Is HP making any decent "workhorse" printers these days? Shamefully, I'm
    > > looking for something that will last me another 15 years after I buy it.
    > >
    > > Constraints for me:
    > >
    > > a)High volume toner cartridges (I need several thousand sheets of paper
    > > between changes). (No inkjet or other technologies that are a hassle.)
    > >
    > > b)Must work with LaTeX, GhostScript, and other serious tecchie applications.
    > >
    > > c)Would be nice if it were directly connectable to an Ethernet network (so I
    > > don't need to turn my big computer on to share the printer with my laptop).
    > >
    > > d)Color not required an in fact not really desired.
    > >
    > > HP is turning out so many printers these days ... it is hard for me to
    > > differentiate the workhorses from ones that aren't as well built.
    > >
    > > Thanks for any input.
    > > ------------------------------------------------------------
    > > David T. Ashley ()
    > > http://www.e3ft.com (Consulting Home Page)
    > > http://www.dtashley.com (Personal Home Page)
    > > http://gpl.e3ft.com (GPL Publications and Projects)

    >
    > I have had such good experiences with HP printers that I don't bother
    > look anywhere else these days. Even the non-workhorse printers (cheapo
    > inkjets etc) are well built. So my feeling is that if the HP website
    > advertises a printer as a workhorse, then it is really a workhorse.
    >
    > I just got a new Laserjet 1320d at my workplace. I haven't had it long,
    > so it is hard to really comment on its longevity, but so far it looks
    > really nice.
    >
    > And even my super cheapo HP inkjet at home has no problem with Latex,
    > ghostscript, etc. So that isn't even an issue.
    >
    > Finally, if you are using unix, the HP drivers, like hpijs, are really
    > outstanding. You really don't need a printer that has postscript
    > natively built in. Just make sure that it is not "windows only."



    I've got an HP 2200D that I've had for about 3 years and it's on its
    2nd cartridge. It has auto duplexing and has worked without a
    hitch through at about 4000 pages. IIRC it was on sale at Staples
    at the time for about $495. A month or so later, toner carts were
    on sale and I got two for about $50 each. I still have one left
    untouched in the garage.


    With lower-cost laser printers now at less than $200, it may be
    appropriate to simply buy two or three and toner when it's on
    sale, then just hope each printer lasts 4 or five years.


    Mark Borgerson
    Mark Borgerson, Dec 31, 2006
    #10
  11. On 2006-12-31, Craig Ruff <> wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > David T. Ashley <> wrote:
    >>What is the best new laser printer to buy (for tecchie home use)?
    >>...

    >
    > The LaserJet 1200n would appear to meet your criteria, but I
    > don't know if they still sell them.


    It's been replaced by the 1320n (which includes a duplexer).
    IIRC the network interface on the 1320n is internal. I've got a
    non-n 1320, and it's worked flawlessly for about two years now
    (I'm a pretty low volume user, I'm still on the original toner
    cartridge). Warm-up is about 15 seconds, and it's comletely
    silent when it's idle.

    Whatever you pick, get something that does postscript in the
    printer.

    --
    Grant Edwards grante Yow! Yow! Those people
    at look exactly like Donnie
    visi.com and Marie Osmond!!
    Grant Edwards, Dec 31, 2006
    #11
  12. "Mark Borgerson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > I've got an HP 2200D that I've had for about 3 years and it's on its
    > 2nd cartridge. It has auto duplexing and has worked without a
    > hitch through at about 4000 pages. IIRC it was on sale at Staples
    > at the time for about $495. A month or so later, toner carts were
    > on sale and I got two for about $50 each. I still have one left
    > untouched in the garage.


    Also, I've looked at the places online that sell drill-and-fill kits (more
    precisely these days, melt-fill-and-plug kits). That also looks enticing to
    save money.
    David T. Ashley, Dec 31, 2006
    #12
  13. On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 19:12:41 -0500, "David T. Ashley" <>
    wrote:

    >What is the best new laser printer to buy (for tecchie home use)?
    >
    >My story: I bought an HP LaserJet 4 in approximately 1992 and put it to
    >medium-volume use. After about 8 years, it started having paper feed
    >problems. I applied some roller renewing chemical to the rubber rollers,
    >which lasted about a year before the paper feed problems reappeared. Then,
    >I ordered a kit of new rollers for $49.00 from a place online--it required a
    >bit of surgery to get them all installed, but now the printer is going
    >strong for several years now with new rollers.
    >
    >I've noticed that the LaserJet 4 parts chain is still going strong, and I
    >can at this point order anything I want. But sooner or later, something
    >will break and the parts chain will dry up.
    >
    >Is HP making any decent "workhorse" printers these days? Shamefully, I'm
    >looking for something that will last me another 15 years after I buy it.
    >
    >Constraints for me:
    >
    >a)High volume toner cartridges (I need several thousand sheets of paper
    >between changes). (No inkjet or other technologies that are a hassle.)
    >
    >b)Must work with LaTeX, GhostScript, and other serious tecchie applications.
    >
    >c)Would be nice if it were directly connectable to an Ethernet network (so I
    >don't need to turn my big computer on to share the printer with my laptop).
    >
    >d)Color not required an in fact not really desired.
    >


    If you are not set on HP, then take a look at Kyocera-Mita. Their
    ceramic drum technology is much better than the offerings of other
    manufacturers. Although their toner cartridges are slightly more
    expensive than similar HP ones, one gets 3 to 4 times as many prints
    from a cartridge. If you get one with KPDL (Their version of
    postscript) and PCL emulation you should not have any trouble
    driving it from any application. Network interfaces with all the usual
    network printer protocol support is not a problem either.

    Regards
    Anton Erasmus
    Anton Erasmus, Dec 31, 2006
    #13
  14. David T. Ashley

    Logan Shaw Guest

    Grant Edwards wrote:
    > Whatever you pick, get something that does postscript in the
    > printer.


    Is that really beneficial these days? It made a lot of sense
    years ago when:
    (a) there was not a freely-available postscript interpreter
    available that also had good fonts, and
    (b) host CPU time and memory were precious and you didn't want
    print jobs hogging your CPU, and
    (c) links between printers and computers were slow (RS232 or
    parallel) and transferring large volumes of raster data
    would have been impractical and slow, and
    (d) documents were not usually that complex and it was unlikely
    the printer's postscript interpreter would run out of
    memory.

    But these days, are *any* of the above true? I think they
    have all changed. Ghostscript has good fonts now, host CPU
    time is practically free (and the host CPU is likely to be
    much more powerful than the printer's, unlike in the past),
    the printer may be linked with USB 2.0 or 100 megabit ethernet
    which is plenty of bandwidth for transferring lots of raster
    data, and documents are often complicated enough that it's
    handy to be able to use the desktop machine's vast memory
    to process them.

    Because of all this, while I would have insisted on postscript
    capability in a printer years ago, these days I think it might
    be better not to use it even if it's there.

    - Logan
    Logan Shaw, Dec 31, 2006
    #14
  15. On 2006-12-31, Logan Shaw <> wrote:

    >> Whatever you pick, get something that does postscript in the
    >> printer.

    >
    > Is that really beneficial these days? It made a lot of sense
    > years ago when:
    >
    > (a) there was not a freely-available postscript interpreter
    > available that also had good fonts, and
    > (b) host CPU time and memory were precious and you didn't want
    > print jobs hogging your CPU, and
    > (c) links between printers and computers were slow (RS232 or
    > parallel) and transferring large volumes of raster data
    > would have been impractical and slow, and
    > (d) documents were not usually that complex and it was unlikely
    > the printer's postscript interpreter would run out of
    > memory.
    >
    > But these days, are *any* of the above true?


    The laser printer I use at work is a Brother something or
    other, that uses Ghostscript to rasterize and yes, I still have
    occasional problems with it rendering things properly. You're
    correct, though, it's much better than it used to be.

    > Because of all this, while I would have insisted on postscript
    > capability in a printer years ago, these days I think it might
    > be better not to use it even if it's there.


    I find I still have less trouble with postscript printers --
    even when they're not Postscript(tm) (the 1320 is actually a
    Postscript clone).

    --
    Grant Edwards grante Yow! Is the EIGHTIES
    at when they had ART DECO
    visi.com and GERALD McBOING-BOING
    lunch boxes??
    Grant Edwards, Dec 31, 2006
    #15
  16. On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 19:12:41 -0500, "David T. Ashley" <> wrote:

    >Is HP making any decent "workhorse" printers these days? Shamefully, I'm
    >looking for something that will last me another 15 years after I buy it.


    Definitely yes.

    My HP history:

    1991: bought used Laserjet II with 2MB memory expansion for 3500 DEM
    1998: sold Laserjet II and bought new Laserjet 6mp
    2006: sold Laserjet 6mp and bought used Laserjet 5000DTN (A3/11x17" paper,
    additional tray, duplex, network card)

    I have never had any serious trouble with any of them. I'd avoid low-end
    models with the 2000 series the lowest end to choose - better something from
    the 4000 or 5000/8000 series (if you need large paper formats).


    Mit freundlichen Grüßen

    Frank-Christian Krügel
    Frank-Christian Kruegel, Jan 1, 2007
    #16
  17. David T. Ashley

    David Kelly Guest

    Anton Erasmus wrote:
    >
    > If you are not set on HP, then take a look at Kyocera-Mita. Their
    > ceramic drum technology is much better than the offerings of other
    > manufacturers. Although their toner cartridges are slightly more
    > expensive than similar HP ones, one gets 3 to 4 times as many prints
    > from a cartridge. If you get one with KPDL (Their version of
    > postscript) and PCL emulation you should not have any trouble
    > driving it from any application.


    KPDL is Kyocera PDL, not Postscript.
    David Kelly, Jan 1, 2007
    #17
  18. David T. Ashley

    David Kelly Guest

    Joerg wrote:
    > Hello David,
    >
    > I went to a Brother Multi Function Center (MFC7820N) that is hooked to
    > the LAN. Works great so far but manual double sided printing would be a
    > pain. Also, it "forgets" its IP address once in a while but a power
    > cycle fixes this. I really like printers on the LAN since they can be
    > accessed by anyone.


    January 2006 I purchased a Brother HL-5250DN over the counter at Staples
    for $250. It has been a very satisfactory printer altho it feels to be
    light weight. Ethernet, USB, PDL, and BRscript (Postscript 3 clone),
    duplex printing, and 30 ppm (duplex is slower).

    Comes with a TN-550 toner which is said to be good for 3500 pages. Half
    the sheets I print have a full page gray scale graphic, toner light came
    on at 1700 pages. So I occasionally shook the cartridge but never saw a
    difference in the quality of output.

    Printed 2800 pages one day before Christmas. About 100 pages into that
    job the toner light came on again and the printer stopped. I didn't
    fight it, simply installed the TN-580 (rated 7000 pages) that had
    knowing the time was coming ($70).

    It doesn't handle envelopes well. Irons wrinkles into the envelope.

    First page from low power standby in about 10 seconds. Printer powers up
    hard and causes my APC UPSs to kick in for a moment. No, I do not run
    the printer off a UPS. Can point web browser at printer and browse or
    fiddle while the printer stays cold.

    Online sources routinely sell this printer for under $200. Shortly after
    I got mine, many bundled an extra paper tray that would hold a full ream
    of paper. Stock tray holds 300 sheets. Have not seen the big tray of
    late, not even as an extra cost option.

    Gets its IP address from dhcpd off my FreeBSD machine. Macintosh has no
    problems finding it via Bonjour. Have not had any problems with it
    forgetting its IP address since upgrading the printer's network
    firmware. Currently has version 1.08 of the Network firmware, 1.07 of
    the Printer Firmware. I don't know why they are separate, that is what
    the printer status page says.

    Aftermarket toner kits are finally available. Haven't tried one, but now
    have a cartridge that needs to be reloaded.

    Drum is separate from toner. Is rated for 25,000 pages and costs $125
    online. If one needs a drum purchase of an entirely new printer does not
    cost much more and includes a roughly $40 value TN-550 toner cartridge too.
    David Kelly, Jan 1, 2007
    #18
  19. David T. Ashley

    David Kelly Guest

    Frank-Christian Kruegel wrote:
    >
    > My HP history:
    >
    > 1991: bought used Laserjet II with 2MB memory expansion for 3500 DEM
    > 1998: sold Laserjet II and bought new Laserjet 6mp
    > 2006: sold Laserjet 6mp and bought used Laserjet 5000DTN (A3/11x17" paper,
    > additional tray, duplex, network card)
    >
    > I have never had any serious trouble with any of them. I'd avoid low-end
    > models with the 2000 series the lowest end to choose - better something from
    > the 4000 or 5000/8000 series (if you need large paper formats).


    I have fond memories of an HP5000N with duplex and several trays. In
    1999 argued with the boss that an HP2100 was not a suitable match as the
    single printer for his $20,000 computer and company-wide network
    purchase. That engineering needed 11x17 and the HP5000N for $2,000 was
    the least cost solution.

    It needed a toner cartridge every 10,000 letter pages at about $140.
    Wasn't always available from the local toner reloaders, and we had
    quality problems with some of the reloads.

    Often I prefer B&W photography over color. For some reason I really
    liked how that HP5000N printed grayscale photos.

    When I left 4 years later that printer had 180,000 pages, still going
    strong, and was long overdue for a maintenance cleaning.
    David Kelly, Jan 1, 2007
    #19
  20. David T. Ashley

    Joerg Guest

    David Kelly wrote:
    > Joerg wrote:
    >
    >> Hello David,
    >>
    >> I went to a Brother Multi Function Center (MFC7820N) that is hooked to
    >> the LAN. Works great so far but manual double sided printing would be
    >> a pain. Also, it "forgets" its IP address once in a while but a power
    >> cycle fixes this. I really like printers on the LAN since they can be
    >> accessed by anyone.

    >
    >
    > January 2006 I purchased a Brother HL-5250DN over the counter at Staples
    > for $250. It has been a very satisfactory printer altho it feels to be
    > light weight. Ethernet, USB, PDL, and BRscript (Postscript 3 clone),
    > duplex printing, and 30 ppm (duplex is slower).
    >
    > Comes with a TN-550 toner which is said to be good for 3500 pages. Half
    > the sheets I print have a full page gray scale graphic, toner light came
    > on at 1700 pages. So I occasionally shook the cartridge but never saw a
    > difference in the quality of output.
    >
    > Printed 2800 pages one day before Christmas. About 100 pages into that
    > job the toner light came on again and the printer stopped. I didn't
    > fight it, simply installed the TN-580 (rated 7000 pages) that had
    > knowing the time was coming ($70).
    >


    Mine wants the TN350 cartridge which I believe is between $40-50. But
    only rated for 2500 pages.


    > It doesn't handle envelopes well. Irons wrinkles into the envelope.
    >


    Never had much luck with envelopes in any printer. Except my old Deskjet
    but the ink can fuzz up if enveloped get wet.


    > First page from low power standby in about 10 seconds. Printer powers up
    > hard and causes my APC UPSs to kick in for a moment. No, I do not run
    > the printer off a UPS. Can point web browser at printer and browse or
    > fiddle while the printer stays cold.
    >


    It sure does power up hard. Probably to make their Marketing happy with
    a nice low number for the seconds from turn on to first page. The light
    dim when it comes on.


    > Online sources routinely sell this printer for under $200. Shortly after
    > I got mine, many bundled an extra paper tray that would hold a full ream
    > of paper. Stock tray holds 300 sheets. Have not seen the big tray of
    > late, not even as an extra cost option.
    >
    > Gets its IP address from dhcpd off my FreeBSD machine. Macintosh has no
    > problems finding it via Bonjour. Have not had any problems with it
    > forgetting its IP address since upgrading the printer's network
    > firmware. Currently has version 1.08 of the Network firmware, 1.07 of
    > the Printer Firmware. I don't know why they are separate, that is what
    > the printer status page says.
    >
    > Aftermarket toner kits are finally available. Haven't tried one, but now
    > have a cartridge that needs to be reloaded.
    >


    Let us know what the result is if you decide to try that. I am many
    months away from exhausting this cartridge.


    > Drum is separate from toner. Is rated for 25,000 pages and costs $125
    > online. If one needs a drum purchase of an entirely new printer does not
    > cost much more and includes a roughly $40 value TN-550 toner cartridge too.


    --
    Regards, Joerg

    http://www.analogconsultants.com
    Joerg, Jan 1, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Favne Reas
    Replies:
    18
    Views:
    959
    Bob May
    Sep 14, 2005
  2. peter
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    434
    tbabes
    Aug 13, 2003
  3. Bob Hayden
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    451
    Barry Watzman
    Jun 21, 2007
  4. Timo Price

    Assinging new USB laser printer to LPT1 port?

    Timo Price, Mar 4, 2009, in forum: PC Hardware
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,601
    Michael Hawes
    Mar 25, 2009
  5. Put 030516 in email subj to get thru

    Best all-in-one laser printer for OS X?

    Put 030516 in email subj to get thru, Feb 12, 2004, in forum: Apple
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    230
    Put 030516 in email subj to get thru
    Feb 12, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page