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Partition of Magic --> Questions about safety

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by SoCal, Jan 31, 2007.

  1. SoCal

    SoCal Guest

    I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB partition.
    It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no need for a separate
    5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for media functions that I do not
    need.


    Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can work on
    the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the computer.


    thanks in advance



    ******************
    Promote Renewabe Energy
    www.CarbonFund.org
     
    1. Advertising

  2. On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 14:51:35 -0600, "SoCal" <>
    wrote:

    >I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB partition.
    >It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no need for a separate
    >5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for media functions that I do not
    >need.
    >
    >
    >Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can work on
    >the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the computer.
    >
    >
    >thanks in advance
    >
    >
    >
    >******************
    >Promote Renewabe Energy
    >www.CarbonFund.org
    >
    >

    I have Partition Magic ver 8, and have used it on my desktop computer
    since Win XP came out, and I've never had any problem with it. But
    I've never tried changing the partition layout on a laptop, just my
    desktop.... On the desktop it's successfully deleted and/or created
    partitions on PATA, SATA, and USB connected PATA drives. I also have a
    small (6 GB) notebook drive (2.5 inch) salvaged from an old notebook
    computer that I have installed in a drive enclosure that connects via
    USB, and PM works flawlessly on that too.
    Charlie Hoffpauir
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
     
    1. Advertising

  3. SoCal

    SoCal Guest

    But have you been able to get it to work on the active partition that
    contains the operating system and the application itself -- running.


    "Charlie Hoffpauir" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 14:51:35 -0600, "SoCal" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB
    >>partition.
    >>It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no need for a
    >>separate
    >>5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for media functions that I do
    >>not
    >>need.
    >>
    >>
    >>Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can work on
    >>the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the computer.
    >>
    >>
    >>thanks in advance
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>******************
    >>Promote Renewabe Energy
    >>www.CarbonFund.org
    >>
    >>

    > I have Partition Magic ver 8, and have used it on my desktop computer
    > since Win XP came out, and I've never had any problem with it. But
    > I've never tried changing the partition layout on a laptop, just my
    > desktop.... On the desktop it's successfully deleted and/or created
    > partitions on PATA, SATA, and USB connected PATA drives. I also have a
    > small (6 GB) notebook drive (2.5 inch) salvaged from an old notebook
    > computer that I have installed in a drive enclosure that connects via
    > USB, and PM works flawlessly on that too.
    > Charlie Hoffpauir
    > http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
     
  4. I use PM on my laptop on the running partition regularly. When you do
    that, it informs you that it will need to boot the computer to apply
    the changes and then writes out a little "batch" file that gets
    invoked upon computer boot-up (and then boots the computer). Then,
    when the computer is booting, it goes into a special mode that runs
    the batch file before booting completely up. When it is done the
    computer boots again and then comes back to normal mode.

    However, I wouldn't be anxious to combine the partitions together. PM
    is reasonably safe for doing so, but it does occassionally fail.
    Maybe 5 times in the 1000's of times I've moved partitions around.
    However, such a failure is often catastrophic when it does occur and
    you lose the partition you were working on. Not real nice, when you
    only have 1 partition and that contains everything of value.

    A better choice would be to use the spare partition as a place where
    you keep data, especialy if you have data you modify a lot and want to
    keep backed up. If you have your programs on one partition and your
    data on another, if one of the partitions go bad, you only have half
    as much lost and needing to be restored.

    Just some advice....
     
  5. On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 18:13:56 -0500, Chris F Clark
    <> wrote:

    >I use PM on my laptop on the running partition regularly. When you do
    >that, it informs you that it will need to boot the computer to apply
    >the changes and then writes out a little "batch" file that gets
    >invoked upon computer boot-up (and then boots the computer). Then,
    >when the computer is booting, it goes into a special mode that runs
    >the batch file before booting completely up. When it is done the
    >computer boots again and then comes back to normal mode.
    >
    >However, I wouldn't be anxious to combine the partitions together. PM
    >is reasonably safe for doing so, but it does occassionally fail.
    >Maybe 5 times in the 1000's of times I've moved partitions around.
    >However, such a failure is often catastrophic when it does occur and
    >you lose the partition you were working on. Not real nice, when you
    >only have 1 partition and that contains everything of value.
    >
    >A better choice would be to use the spare partition as a place where
    >you keep data, especialy if you have data you modify a lot and want to
    >keep backed up. If you have your programs on one partition and your
    >data on another, if one of the partitions go bad, you only have half
    >as much lost and needing to be restored.
    >
    >Just some advice....


    I agree with Chris... I have used PM on the C drive of my operating
    computer (lots of times) but only to physically make the partition
    size larger. And I always have a complete spare drive available "just
    in case". I use Acronis TrueImage and clone the entire hard drive that
    the OS is on, so if anything goes wrong, I can just replace the entire
    drive. I do have a notebook computer, and have also used PM on that to
    create a data partition. But since I was unable to have a complete
    backup drive on the notebook, I was very nervous when I made this
    change..... and to make sure I eliminated as many variables as
    possible, I made sure I had a fully charged battery AND ran the
    notebook on a UPS AC line while the changes were being make.

    One thing that willl surely corrupt the process is to lose power
    during the changes.
    Charlie Hoffpauir
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
     
  6. Re: Partition Magic --> Questions about safety

    Partition Magic (no "of") generally works. But every once in a while [a
    low single digit percentage, I'd guess] it doesn't, for reasons known
    only to God, so it's wise to make an image backup before using it.


    SoCal wrote:
    > I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB partition.
    > It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no need for a separate
    > 5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for media functions that I do not
    > need.
    >
    >
    > Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can work on
    > the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the computer.
    >
    >
    > thanks in advance
    >
    >
    >
    > ******************
    > Promote Renewabe Energy
    > www.CarbonFund.org
    >
    >
    >
     
  7. It can't do that in that manner, and doesn't claim to. To change the
    boot partition, you boot from the Partition Magic CD (which is bootable)
    and do the repartition with Windows not running. You have to be able to
    boot from a CD.


    SoCal wrote:
    > But have you been able to get it to work on the active partition that
    > contains the operating system and the application itself -- running.
    >
    >
    > "Charlie Hoffpauir" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 14:51:35 -0600, "SoCal" <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB
    >>> partition.
    >>> It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no need for a
    >>> separate
    >>> 5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for media functions that I do
    >>> not
    >>> need.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can work on
    >>> the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the computer.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> thanks in advance
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ******************
    >>> Promote Renewabe Energy
    >>> www.CarbonFund.org
    >>>
    >>>

    >> I have Partition Magic ver 8, and have used it on my desktop computer
    >> since Win XP came out, and I've never had any problem with it. But
    >> I've never tried changing the partition layout on a laptop, just my
    >> desktop.... On the desktop it's successfully deleted and/or created
    >> partitions on PATA, SATA, and USB connected PATA drives. I also have a
    >> small (6 GB) notebook drive (2.5 inch) salvaged from an old notebook
    >> computer that I have installed in a drive enclosure that connects via
    >> USB, and PM works flawlessly on that too.
    >> Charlie Hoffpauir
    >> http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/

    >
    >
     
  8. That also works, but it's dangerous. Partition Magic actually modifies
    the boot sector to boot to DOS, make the change, and then reverses it's
    own modification of the boot sector so that the system again boots to
    the original OS.


    Chris F Clark wrote:
    > I use PM on my laptop on the running partition regularly. When you do
    > that, it informs you that it will need to boot the computer to apply
    > the changes and then writes out a little "batch" file that gets
    > invoked upon computer boot-up (and then boots the computer). Then,
    > when the computer is booting, it goes into a special mode that runs
    > the batch file before booting completely up. When it is done the
    > computer boots again and then comes back to normal mode.
    >
    > However, I wouldn't be anxious to combine the partitions together. PM
    > is reasonably safe for doing so, but it does occassionally fail.
    > Maybe 5 times in the 1000's of times I've moved partitions around.
    > However, such a failure is often catastrophic when it does occur and
    > you lose the partition you were working on. Not real nice, when you
    > only have 1 partition and that contains everything of value.
    >
    > A better choice would be to use the spare partition as a place where
    > you keep data, especialy if you have data you modify a lot and want to
    > keep backed up. If you have your programs on one partition and your
    > data on another, if one of the partitions go bad, you only have half
    > as much lost and needing to be restored.
    >
    > Just some advice....
     
  9. On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 19:54:03 -0500, Barry Watzman
    <> wrote:

    >It can't do that in that manner, and doesn't claim to. To change the
    >boot partition, you boot from the Partition Magic CD (which is bootable)
    >and do the repartition with Windows not running. You have to be able to
    >boot from a CD.
    >
    >
    >SoCal wrote:
    >> But have you been able to get it to work on the active partition that
    >> contains the operating system and the application itself -- running.
    >>
    >>


    I think we aren't communicating well...

    PM WILL operate on the "boot partition" of a drive.... I've done it
    several times. That is to say, I've increased the size of the logical
    C drive of my computer (and correspondingly reduced the size of
    another partition of the same physical drive). To do this, PM
    "reboots" the computer, but it does NOT require you to boot from a CD.

    It seems correct to say that Windows is NOT running, as PM boots into
    a DOS OS to make the change, so in that I completely agree with you.
    But the "DOS boot up" is made without using a CD. In truth, I have no
    idea how it does that.
    Charlie Hoffpauir
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
     
  10. Re: "But the "DOS boot up" is made without using a CD."

    It can be done both ways.


    Charlie Hoffpauir wrote:
    > On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 19:54:03 -0500, Barry Watzman
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> It can't do that in that manner, and doesn't claim to. To change the
    >> boot partition, you boot from the Partition Magic CD (which is bootable)
    >> and do the repartition with Windows not running. You have to be able to
    >> boot from a CD.
    >>
    >>
    >> SoCal wrote:
    >>> But have you been able to get it to work on the active partition that
    >>> contains the operating system and the application itself -- running.
    >>>
    >>>

    >
    > I think we aren't communicating well...
    >
    > PM WILL operate on the "boot partition" of a drive.... I've done it
    > several times. That is to say, I've increased the size of the logical
    > C drive of my computer (and correspondingly reduced the size of
    > another partition of the same physical drive). To do this, PM
    > "reboots" the computer, but it does NOT require you to boot from a CD.
    >
    > It seems correct to say that Windows is NOT running, as PM boots into
    > a DOS OS to make the change, so in that I completely agree with you.
    > But the "DOS boot up" is made without using a CD. In truth, I have no
    > idea how it does that.
    > Charlie Hoffpauir
    > http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
     
  11. John Doue

    John Doue Guest

    Barry Watzman wrote:
    > It can't do that in that manner, and doesn't claim to. To change the
    > boot partition, you boot from the Partition Magic CD (which is bootable)
    > and do the repartition with Windows not running. You have to be able to
    > boot from a CD.
    >
    >
    > SoCal wrote:
    >> But have you been able to get it to work on the active partition that
    >> contains the operating system and the application itself -- running.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Charlie Hoffpauir" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 14:51:35 -0600, "SoCal" <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB
    >>>> partition.
    >>>> It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no need for a
    >>>> separate
    >>>> 5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for media functions that I
    >>>> do not
    >>>> need.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can
    >>>> work on
    >>>> the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the computer.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> thanks in advance
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> ******************
    >>>> Promote Renewabe Energy
    >>>> www.CarbonFund.org
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> I have Partition Magic ver 8, and have used it on my desktop computer
    >>> since Win XP came out, and I've never had any problem with it. But
    >>> I've never tried changing the partition layout on a laptop, just my
    >>> desktop.... On the desktop it's successfully deleted and/or created
    >>> partitions on PATA, SATA, and USB connected PATA drives. I also have a
    >>> small (6 GB) notebook drive (2.5 inch) salvaged from an old notebook
    >>> computer that I have installed in a drive enclosure that connects via
    >>> USB, and PM works flawlessly on that too.
    >>> Charlie Hoffpauir
    >>> http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/

    >>
    >>

    Sorry to contradict you Barry, but unless I misunderstand you, Partition
    Magic does work on the boot partition, even if it is installed on it,
    and this, without using the CD. The only case I have had to use PM from
    a removable device (rescue diskettes in that case) was when recently, my
    hd became so messed up for unclear reasons that I could no longer open
    Windows. And I have been using PM since version 3.

    This being said, although PM rarely fails, all the advice given here is
    extremely appropriate because, when it does fail, it is very difficult
    to recover. I will add one extremely important advice I have never seen
    mentioned and which might be at the root of some of the rare failures of PM.

    PM unfortunately does not check the integrity of the partitions it is
    requested to work on BEFORE it attempts to do the job (AFAIK,
    Diskdirector from Acronis does not either). If one of the interested
    partitions has a problem (cross-linked files for instance), PM detects
    it (supposedly, I am inclined to add) ONLY at the beginning of the
    execution of the process regarding that precise partition and quits.
    Unless only one change was requested, the chain of orders PM is
    executing is interrupted, and your system may be left in an unsuitable
    configuration when it reboots.

    I also suspect PM does occasionally miss some file system errors, which
    may lead to the worst failures.

    To avoid taking any risk, my advice is: ALWAYS check the partitions you
    intend to modify, first with Windows tools (My computer, properties,
    tools), then with the check command within PM. Make double sure no
    errors are left. Further more, when PM states it cannot check the
    partition because it has open files, cancel whatever operations you
    intended to do, exit PM and make sure to check the box "automatically
    correct file system errors" in "My computer, properties, tools, check
    now" and to accept Yes when windows tells you it will need to reboot to
    do this. Reboot, any error will be corrected and you will then be safe.
    Resume PM.

    I believe it is a major deficiency in the design of PM (and, unless I am
    wrong, of Disk director) not to systematically thoroughly check the
    partitions BEFORE offering the go ahead with the requested changes.

    Unfortunately, PM is dead in the water and no longer developed, so I
    would be careful using it on very large disks. Then, it does not handle
    some type of disk controllers well, Thinkpads being a typical case where
    PM fails to properly identify and recognize secondary disks (slimbay,
    usb, firewire). In such cases, I have to use Diskdirector, which I find
    less user-friendly and flexible, but which works in all cases, at least,
    in my experience.

    Best regards

    --
    John Doue
     
  12. Pop`

    Pop` Guest

    SoCal wrote:
    > I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB
    > partition. It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no
    > need for a separate 5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for
    > media functions that I do not need.
    >
    >
    > Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can
    > work on the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the
    > computer.
    >
    > thanks in advance
    >
    >
    >
    > ******************
    > Promote Renewabe Energy
    > www.CarbonFund.org


    You still need to back up, no matter what you do or how you do it. To do
    different is foolhardy and invites trouble.

    Why not just reinstall from scratch and set it to all one partition as you
    do so? Save your money on stuff you 'don't have and won'tneed later on.
     
  13. John Doue

    John Doue Guest

    Pop` wrote:
    > SoCal wrote:
    >> I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB
    >> partition. It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no
    >> need for a separate 5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for
    >> media functions that I do not need.
    >>
    >>
    >> Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can
    >> work on the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the
    >> computer.
    >>
    >> thanks in advance
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> ******************
    >> Promote Renewabe Energy
    >> www.CarbonFund.org

    >
    > You still need to back up, no matter what you do or how you do it. To do
    > different is foolhardy and invites trouble.
    >
    > Why not just reinstall from scratch and set it to all one partition as you
    > do so? Save your money on stuff you 'don't have and won'tneed later on.
    >
    >

    The advice to backup, especially if you do not have an installation disk
    must not be overlooked. But your mention of "on the fly" and of "taking
    the drive out" makes me wonder if you have enough computer knowledge to
    mess with partitions, no offense meant. In case of doubt, ask someone
    knowledgeable.

    Yes, either Partition Magic or Disk Director will easily do the job:
    first delete the empty partition, then resize the c: drive to use all
    the available space. Still, this may not be the best idea and using this
    partition for a specific purpose might be a better idea. Again, ask a
    knowledgeable neighbor if you have any doubt, it is very either to end
    up with a door step ...

    Best regards

    --
    John Doue
     
  14. Re: "Sorry to contradict you Barry, but unless I misunderstand you,
    Partition Magic does work on the boot partition, even if it is installed
    on it, and this, without using the CD."

    That's correct, but not while Windows is running. It modifies the boot
    sector so that the computer, when rebooted, will boot to DOS rather than
    Windows, then it restarts the computer (to DOS), which is the same
    environment that you get if you boot from the CD. When done, it
    modifies the boot sector of the hard drive back to restore normal
    Windows booting.


    John Doue wrote:
    > Barry Watzman wrote:
    >> It can't do that in that manner, and doesn't claim to. To change the
    >> boot partition, you boot from the Partition Magic CD (which is
    >> bootable) and do the repartition with Windows not running. You have
    >> to be able to boot from a CD.
    >>
    >>
    >> SoCal wrote:
    >>> But have you been able to get it to work on the active partition that
    >>> contains the operating system and the application itself -- running.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Charlie Hoffpauir" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 14:51:35 -0600, "SoCal" <>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB
    >>>>> partition.
    >>>>> It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no need for a
    >>>>> separate
    >>>>> 5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for media functions that
    >>>>> I do not
    >>>>> need.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can
    >>>>> work on
    >>>>> the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the computer.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> thanks in advance
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> ******************
    >>>>> Promote Renewabe Energy
    >>>>> www.CarbonFund.org
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>> I have Partition Magic ver 8, and have used it on my desktop computer
    >>>> since Win XP came out, and I've never had any problem with it. But
    >>>> I've never tried changing the partition layout on a laptop, just my
    >>>> desktop.... On the desktop it's successfully deleted and/or created
    >>>> partitions on PATA, SATA, and USB connected PATA drives. I also have a
    >>>> small (6 GB) notebook drive (2.5 inch) salvaged from an old notebook
    >>>> computer that I have installed in a drive enclosure that connects via
    >>>> USB, and PM works flawlessly on that too.
    >>>> Charlie Hoffpauir
    >>>> http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
    >>>
    >>>

    > Sorry to contradict you Barry, but unless I misunderstand you, Partition
    > Magic does work on the boot partition, even if it is installed on it,
    > and this, without using the CD. The only case I have had to use PM from
    > a removable device (rescue diskettes in that case) was when recently, my
    > hd became so messed up for unclear reasons that I could no longer open
    > Windows. And I have been using PM since version 3.
    >
    > This being said, although PM rarely fails, all the advice given here is
    > extremely appropriate because, when it does fail, it is very difficult
    > to recover. I will add one extremely important advice I have never seen
    > mentioned and which might be at the root of some of the rare failures of
    > PM.
    >
    > PM unfortunately does not check the integrity of the partitions it is
    > requested to work on BEFORE it attempts to do the job (AFAIK,
    > Diskdirector from Acronis does not either). If one of the interested
    > partitions has a problem (cross-linked files for instance), PM detects
    > it (supposedly, I am inclined to add) ONLY at the beginning of the
    > execution of the process regarding that precise partition and quits.
    > Unless only one change was requested, the chain of orders PM is
    > executing is interrupted, and your system may be left in an unsuitable
    > configuration when it reboots.
    >
    > I also suspect PM does occasionally miss some file system errors, which
    > may lead to the worst failures.
    >
    > To avoid taking any risk, my advice is: ALWAYS check the partitions you
    > intend to modify, first with Windows tools (My computer, properties,
    > tools), then with the check command within PM. Make double sure no
    > errors are left. Further more, when PM states it cannot check the
    > partition because it has open files, cancel whatever operations you
    > intended to do, exit PM and make sure to check the box "automatically
    > correct file system errors" in "My computer, properties, tools, check
    > now" and to accept Yes when windows tells you it will need to reboot to
    > do this. Reboot, any error will be corrected and you will then be safe.
    > Resume PM.
    >
    > I believe it is a major deficiency in the design of PM (and, unless I am
    > wrong, of Disk director) not to systematically thoroughly check the
    > partitions BEFORE offering the go ahead with the requested changes.
    >
    > Unfortunately, PM is dead in the water and no longer developed, so I
    > would be careful using it on very large disks. Then, it does not handle
    > some type of disk controllers well, Thinkpads being a typical case where
    > PM fails to properly identify and recognize secondary disks (slimbay,
    > usb, firewire). In such cases, I have to use Diskdirector, which I find
    > less user-friendly and flexible, but which works in all cases, at least,
    > in my experience.
    >
    > Best regards
    >
     
  15. Well, it is still interesting to know you can do it by booting the CD.
    I've always hated using PM on my primary partition because of the rare
    chance something bad will happen (and I have had that happen, say 5 or
    so times over the years I've used the product). However, booting
    straight from the CD and repairing the damage would be a little more
    hopeful.

    Thanks for the info,
    -Chris
     
  16. M.I.5¾

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    "Charlie Hoffpauir" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 18:13:56 -0500, Chris F Clark
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>I use PM on my laptop on the running partition regularly. When you do
    >>that, it informs you that it will need to boot the computer to apply
    >>the changes and then writes out a little "batch" file that gets
    >>invoked upon computer boot-up (and then boots the computer). Then,
    >>when the computer is booting, it goes into a special mode that runs
    >>the batch file before booting completely up. When it is done the
    >>computer boots again and then comes back to normal mode.
    >>
    >>However, I wouldn't be anxious to combine the partitions together. PM
    >>is reasonably safe for doing so, but it does occassionally fail.
    >>Maybe 5 times in the 1000's of times I've moved partitions around.
    >>However, such a failure is often catastrophic when it does occur and
    >>you lose the partition you were working on. Not real nice, when you
    >>only have 1 partition and that contains everything of value.
    >>
    >>A better choice would be to use the spare partition as a place where
    >>you keep data, especialy if you have data you modify a lot and want to
    >>keep backed up. If you have your programs on one partition and your
    >>data on another, if one of the partitions go bad, you only have half
    >>as much lost and needing to be restored.
    >>
    >>Just some advice....

    >
    > I agree with Chris... I have used PM on the C drive of my operating
    > computer (lots of times) but only to physically make the partition
    > size larger. And I always have a complete spare drive available "just
    > in case". I use Acronis TrueImage and clone the entire hard drive that
    > the OS is on, so if anything goes wrong, I can just replace the entire
    > drive. I do have a notebook computer, and have also used PM on that to
    > create a data partition. But since I was unable to have a complete
    > backup drive on the notebook, I was very nervous when I made this
    > change..... and to make sure I eliminated as many variables as
    > possible, I made sure I had a fully charged battery AND ran the
    > notebook on a UPS AC line while the changes were being make.
    >
    > One thing that willl surely corrupt the process is to lose power
    > during the changes.


    Partition Magic is allegedly designed such that if the process is
    interupted, it is able to recover and carry on from where it left off.
    Having said that, the one time I needed to, it wouldn't.
     
  17. SoCal

    SoCal Guest

    Yes, I am actually a former research engineer. As I have multiple
    computers, I can take the m1710 drive out and place it into portable
    enclosure and repartition it on my second computer.

    I have done this before.


    "John Doue" <> wrote in message
    news:vxqwh.280$...
    > Pop` wrote:
    >> SoCal wrote:
    >>> I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB
    >>> partition. It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no
    >>> need for a separate 5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for
    >>> media functions that I do not need.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can
    >>> work on the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the
    >>> computer.
    >>>
    >>> thanks in advance
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ******************
    >>> Promote Renewabe Energy
    >>> www.CarbonFund.org

    >>
    >> You still need to back up, no matter what you do or how you do it. To do
    >> different is foolhardy and invites trouble.
    >>
    >> Why not just reinstall from scratch and set it to all one partition as
    >> you do so? Save your money on stuff you 'don't have and won'tneed later
    >> on.

    > The advice to backup, especially if you do not have an installation disk
    > must not be overlooked. But your mention of "on the fly" and of "taking
    > the drive out" makes me wonder if you have enough computer knowledge to
    > mess with partitions, no offense meant. In case of doubt, ask someone
    > knowledgeable.
    >
    > Yes, either Partition Magic or Disk Director will easily do the job: first
    > delete the empty partition, then resize the c: drive to use all the
    > available space. Still, this may not be the best idea and using this
    > partition for a specific purpose might be a better idea. Again, ask a
    > knowledgeable neighbor if you have any doubt, it is very either to end up
    > with a door step ...
    >
    > Best regards
    >
    > --
    > John Doue
     
  18. John Doue

    John Doue Guest

    SoCal wrote:
    > Yes, I am actually a former research engineer. As I have multiple
    > computers, I can take the m1710 drive out and place it into portable
    > enclosure and repartition it on my second computer.
    >
    > I have done this before.
    >
    >
    > "John Doue" <> wrote in message
    > news:vxqwh.280$...
    >> Pop` wrote:
    >>> SoCal wrote:
    >>>> I have a new Dell M1710 notebook with a previously unused 4.7 GB
    >>>> partition. It would be nice to have a single partition as I have no
    >>>> need for a separate 5 GB space. Presumably, this was created for
    >>>> media functions that I do not need.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Does anyone have experience with these partition programs that can
    >>>> work on the fly? I would prefer not to take the drive out of the
    >>>> computer.
    >>>>
    >>>> thanks in advance
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> ******************
    >>>> Promote Renewabe Energy
    >>>> www.CarbonFund.org
    >>> You still need to back up, no matter what you do or how you do it. To do
    >>> different is foolhardy and invites trouble.
    >>>
    >>> Why not just reinstall from scratch and set it to all one partition as
    >>> you do so? Save your money on stuff you 'don't have and won'tneed later
    >>> on.

    >> The advice to backup, especially if you do not have an installation disk
    >> must not be overlooked. But your mention of "on the fly" and of "taking
    >> the drive out" makes me wonder if you have enough computer knowledge to
    >> mess with partitions, no offense meant. In case of doubt, ask someone
    >> knowledgeable.
    >>
    >> Yes, either Partition Magic or Disk Director will easily do the job: first
    >> delete the empty partition, then resize the c: drive to use all the
    >> available space. Still, this may not be the best idea and using this
    >> partition for a specific purpose might be a better idea. Again, ask a
    >> knowledgeable neighbor if you have any doubt, it is very either to end up
    >> with a door step ...
    >>
    >> Best regards
    >>
    >> --
    >> John Doue

    >
    >

    Unless I missed something, why bother to move the hard drive? Just
    repartition it where it is now. And sorry for the typo in the last
    sentence of my previous post, I am sure you understood I meant "very
    easy" and not "very either".

    Regards

    --
    John Doue
     
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