PCI Bus Compatibility Question

Discussion in 'IBM' started by bennettjr@gmail.com, May 4, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Hello,

    Would someone be so kind as to explain the fundamental differences
    between PCI 64 and PCI Express? Is it likely that a PCI Express device
    would function in a PCI 64 slot?

    I'm currently involved in a low budget project to test some video
    capture technologies. The test platform we have available is an IBM
    eServer xSeries 350, which has several 64 Bit PCI slots. One device I'd
    like to test is a PCI Express device.

    This is likely a dumb question, but I've been focused on enterprise
    application development for the past few years and have lost track of
    developments in hardware. (At this point, I'm not sure if I could tell
    the difference between a 5V and a low voltage 32 bit PCI card! Sad... I
    know.)

    Thanks in advance,

    John
     
    , May 4, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Joe Pfeiffer Guest

    writes:
    >
    > Would someone be so kind as to explain the fundamental differences
    > between PCI 64 and PCI Express? Is it likely that a PCI Express device
    > would function in a PCI 64 slot?


    They are fundamentally different. At the hardware level, they are
    best described by saying they have nothing in common (I'm sure
    somebody will point out something they share that I don't know
    about... but not much).

    PCI 64 is a 64-bit parallel bus. PCI-Express is a very fast serial
    bus (with a notion of "lanes" to allow several of these serial
    channels to operate in parallel).

    There is no possibility whatever that a PCI-Express will work in a PCI
    64 slot. I wouldn't be surprised to be told that they were careful to
    make sure it wouldn't even fit in the slot, in order to make sure
    nobody caused damage by trying it.
    --
    Joseph J. Pfeiffer, Jr., Ph.D. Phone -- (505) 646-1605
    Department of Computer Science FAX -- (505) 646-1002
    New Mexico State University http://www.cs.nmsu.edu/~pfeiffer
     
    Joe Pfeiffer, May 4, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. daytripper Guest

    On 4 May 2006 09:10:37 -0700, wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >Would someone be so kind as to explain the fundamental differences
    >between PCI 64 and PCI Express? Is it likely that a PCI Express device
    >would function in a PCI 64 slot?
    >
    >I'm currently involved in a low budget project to test some video
    >capture technologies. The test platform we have available is an IBM
    >eServer xSeries 350, which has several 64 Bit PCI slots. One device I'd
    >like to test is a PCI Express device.
    >
    >This is likely a dumb question, but I've been focused on enterprise
    >application development for the past few years and have lost track of
    >developments in hardware. (At this point, I'm not sure if I could tell
    >the difference between a 5V and a low voltage 32 bit PCI card! Sad... I
    >know.)
    >
    >Thanks in advance,
    >
    >John


    Fundamental Difference #1: PCI (all flavors) and PCI-X Mode 1 both use
    single-ended, multi-drop interconnects, 32 or 64 bits in width. PCI Express
    uses point-to-point low-voltage differential interconnects, 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16
    bits in width.

    There is no similarity between the connectors used for each. You cannot plug a
    PCI Express card into a PCI or PCI-X connector, nor vice versa...

    Cheers

    /daytripper
     
    daytripper, May 4, 2006
    #3
  4. Guest

    That's about as clear an explanation as could be. This is the kind of
    question that results when you allow systems analysts access to the...
    oh... what do you call those things.... screwdrivers! ;)

    Thank you both.

    John
     
    , May 5, 2006
    #4
  5. Joe Pfeiffer Guest

    writes:

    > That's about as clear an explanation as could be. This is the kind of
    > question that results when you allow systems analysts access to the...
    > oh... what do you call those things.... screwdrivers! ;)


    I'm always careful to keep a screwdriver handy. I find the machines
    are much less uppity when they know they could be dismantled at a
    moment's notice... and who knows if they'd ever go back together
    again?
    --
    Joseph J. Pfeiffer, Jr., Ph.D. Phone -- (505) 646-1605
    Department of Computer Science FAX -- (505) 646-1002
    New Mexico State University http://www.cs.nmsu.edu/~pfeiffer
     
    Joe Pfeiffer, May 5, 2006
    #5
  6. Guest

    Mechanical expertise is inversely proportional to the number of parts
    left over after reassembly. Or, more philosophically: If the whole is
    greater than the sum of its parts, then it thus follows that virtue
    belongs to those who possess the active readiness to create more than
    was before by assembling from the sum of the parts a whole... and
    finding where all of the screws go. ;)
     
    , May 5, 2006
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. pigdos
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    385
    - HAL9000
    Feb 17, 2006
  2. ajb
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    306
    Barry Watzman
    Oct 27, 2003
  3. Dada
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    462
  4. Markus Forrer

    CAN Bus with automatical bus termination

    Markus Forrer, Oct 6, 2004, in forum: Embedded
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    1,054
    Tutors of ESAcademy
    Oct 19, 2004
  5. Christopher

    Socket A 333 bus VS 400 bus

    Christopher, Sep 27, 2005, in forum: AMD Overclocking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    282
    Wes Newell
    Sep 27, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page